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BARS Blog

News and Commentary from the British Association for Romantic Studies

Anna Mercer

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Romantic Europe: The Virtual Exhibition

A message from Alice Rhodes, BARS European Engagement Fellow (University of York)

Dear all,

Hopefully you’re staying safe and well in these challenging times. 

As many of us move our teaching and research online, we’d like to draw your attention to Romantic Europe: The Virtual Exhibition (RÊVE) as a digital resource to use both with your undergraduate and graduate students and in your own research.

From inkstands, books, and travelling cases to trees, clouds, and volcanos, RÊVE brings together iconic objects of Romanticism from across Europe alongside original commentary and cutting-edge research from academics and heritage professionals around the world. 

We’re now releasing new exhibits every Friday and you can follow us on Twitter (@euromanticism) for updates on our latest posts. We’d also love to hear how you’re making use of the exhibition in online teaching, whether it’s to explore the materiality and geography of Romanticism, as a research tool, a model for writing or research tasks, a creative prompt, a way of thinking about collections, curation and the way that objects speak to one another, or something else entirely. 

Last but not least, we’re delighted to announce the release of the first in our series of bi-weekly collections. The collections are designed to bring together individual exhibits from locations across Europe to facilitate productive juxtapositions and conversations. They are meant to make it easier to use the virtual exhibition. They are also meant to serve as a model for how users might themselves construct their own collections from within the virtual exhibition more generally. 

Our first collection, Romantic Authorship features “Petrarch’s Inkstand” by Nicola J. Watson, “The Table of Inkwells” by Jean-Marc Hovasse, “Adam Mickiewicz’s Tie Pin” by Małgorzata Wichowska, “Lord Byron’s Autograph at the Castle of Chillon” by Patrick Vincent, “Sir Walter Scott’s Elbow Chair: The Seat of Power” by Kirsty Archer-Thompson and “Two pages from Dorothy Wordsworth’s Grasmere Journal” by Jeff Cowton and can be viewed here

Romanticism: online resources list

Following our recent call to share online resources, we’re delighted to say we’ve had a great response to this so far.

This list is not complete yet, as we are working through the messages received and adding to the list as time goes on. You can therefore still send us further resources to add to the list: britishassociationromantic@gmail.com

Please do let us know if we have missed anything!

GENERAL

Open University Openlearn
Free resources on Romanticism. An OpenLearn search by writer’s name (e.g. Byron, Shelley, De Quincey, Wordsworth, Hoffmann, Austen etc) will return plenty of hits. Search also by module code: specifically A207, AA316. Resources include images, audio, video, animations, BBC programmes and teaching materials including seminar-style and independent activities, all geared to undergraduate level.

Romantic Textualities
An online resource on ‘Teaching Romanticism’, in which contributors consider the ways in which we lecture on and discuss individual authors, whether during author-specific modules or broader period surveys.

NeuRoN: Digital Resources for Researching British Romanticism
Part of ‘Romanticism on the Net’. NeuRoN functions as a new nerve center for digital research on British Romanticism, offering a stable, extensive, and up-to-date catalog of web-based resources in the field. NeuRoN lists, describes, and links to online archives, databases, indexes, and editions that are at once sufficiently reliable for scholarly use and directly relevant to British literature and culture of the “Romantic Century” (1750-1850).

Romantic Europe: The Virtual Exhibition (RÊVE)
An online research project by European Romanticisms in Association (ERA), supported by BARS. The virtual exhibition is designed to address both an academic and a general audience as an interdisciplinary project showcasing and sharing Romantic texts, objects, and places through collaborations between academic researchers, museums, galleries and other cultural groupings.

The K-SAA Blog
News, articles and interviews from the Keats-Shelley Association of America (K-SAA). Recent features include the ‘What Are You Reading?’ series, which presents interviews with Romanticism scholars. They are also currently running a competition (open to all) with the Thomas Chatterton Society: can you write a new ode or elegy to Chatterton?

Romantic London
A research project exploring life and culture in London around the turn of the nineteenth century.

Romantic Circles
A refereed scholarly website devoted to the study of Romantic-period literature and culture.

The Real Percy Bysshe Shelley
A website featuring reflections on the philosophy, politics and poetry of Percy Bysshe Shelley.

The Shelley-Godwin Archive
Providing the digitised manuscripts of Percy Bysshe Shelley, Mary Wollstonecraft Shelley, William Godwin, and Mary Wollstonecraft.

The Romanticism Blog via The Wordsworth Trust
Here you will find lively and engaging explorations of the literature, history and culture of the Romantic period (1750 to 1850) from a variety of contributors. 

Cambridge Core
Cambridge Core has made around 700 of its online texts open access until the end of May 2020.

Museo Glauco Lombardi
Museum in Parma with a collection of nineteenth-century art and cultural works. The collection is online (see main link above – there is a search tool), and they also present a virtual tour.

Shelley’s Ghost
Shelley’s Ghost: Reshaping the Image of a Literary Family (via Bodleian Libraries) explores how the reputation of the Shelley-Godwin family was shaped by the selective release of documents and manuscripts into the public domain. It also provides a fascinating insight into the real lives of a family that was blessed with genius but marred by tragedy. Exhibits can be viewed online.

Catherine Redford’s Romanticism Blog
A blog on Romanticism that also has its own useful list of other online Romanticism resources!

The Free German Hochstift / Frankfurt Goethe Museum
View their digital catalogue, and two new online projects: ‘Gesichter für das Romantik-Museum’ (‘Faces for the Romantic Museum’) and ‘Das Album der Maxe von Arnim – Souvenirs aus Rom‘ (‘The album of the Maxe von Arnim – souvenirs from Rome’).

The John Clare Society
The journal is free to read online. You can also enjoy the actor Toby Jones reading Clare’s work, and the society have compiled a list of recordings and programmes about Clare.

The 18th-Century Common
A public humanities website for enthusiasts of eighteenth-century studies. The 18th-Century Common offers a public space for sharing the research of scholars who study eighteenth-century cultures with nonacademic readers.

The Online Resource for ERIN, or Europe’s Reception of the Irish Melodies and National Airs: Thomas Moore in Europe
This open-access resource charts the reception of music inspired by Lalla Rookh as well as the reception of the Irish Melodies and the National Airs from 1808-1880 through the following media: a union catalogue, a total of eight OMEKA collections and exhibits, over 50 recordings, and a blog.

The Keats Letters Project
By publishing each letter on the 200th anniversary of its original composition alongside reflections on that letter by some of today’s most exciting scholars and poets, the Keats Letters Project offers a new Keats for the 21st-century – one inspired by both the material traces of Romantic-period correspondence and our own digital media environment, and one that aims to respond to the playful, heartfelt, and speculative spirit of Keats’s letters.

Romantik: Journal for the Study of Romanticism

Enlightenment and Dissent, journal hosted by Queen Mary Centre for Religion and Literature in English

Dissenting Academies Online 

Peter Cochran’s annotated Byron texts 

Romanticism and Victorianism on the Net 

The Coleridge Bulletin
– back issues mostly available online. 

Works of Mary Hays, ed. Timothy Whelan. 

Timothy Whelan’s Romantic-period resources for the study of religious dissent 

CRIER Italian journal for Romantic studies
, articles in various languages including English.

Project: ‘Other languages, other weapons: English, French, German and Portuguese pro-Spanish poetry from the War of Independence (1808-14); edition, translation and study’

Forthcoming project: ‘The Poetry and Triennium project: English, German, Italian, Portuguese and French poetic texts on the Spanish liberal revolution (1820-1823)’

Online tours of Newstead Abbey (1. September 2019 Exhibitions, 2. Edward Burne-Jones) and YouTube videos (example – you can search for others).

Guerra e Historia Pública – a resource in English and Spanish, containing more than 600 resources and other items focusing on the Peninsular War.

‘What Jane Saw’ – You are invited to time travel to two art exhibitions witnessed by Jane Austen: the Sir Joshua Reynolds retrospective in 1813 or the Shakespeare Gallery as it looked in 1796.

Resources via British Library – Discovering Literature, Romantics and Victorians / Discovering Literature: Restoration and 18th Century / Picturing Places

Orlando: Women’s Writing in the British Isles from the Beginnings to the Present.

ONLINE COURSES

MOOC – Walter Scott: The Man Behind the Monument
Starts on Monday 23 March. This course was produced as a partnership between the Walter Scott Research Centre at the University of Aberdeen and Abbotsford, Scott’s home in the Scottish Borders. It was filmed mostly at Abbotsford and explores topics such as Scott’s ballad collecting, the work behind the production of the Edinburgh Editions of Scott’s fiction and poetry and the relationship between Scott’s collecting activities and creativity. 

Immersive courses at the Wordsworth Trust
The Trust can offer hour-long online sessions highlighting the collection, and showing students key texts and manuscripts. Includes discussions of original materials brought to life by the Trust’s experienced curatorial team.

MOOC – Jane Austen: Myth, Reality and Global Celebrity
Started 16 March 2020. Includes learning activities focusing on Austen and her novels, but also sections that present extracts from Mary Wollstonecraft and Hannah More on female education, early biographies and translations of Austen, as well as material on adaptation and more. Many videos were filmed at both Chawton House and the Jane Austen House museum and beyond.

MOOC – Writing the West: Literature and Place
The interactive aspect of this course is no longer present but people can still work their way through the articles, videos, and quizzes. This course focuses on writers from the late eighteenth- and nineteenth centuries associated with Bristol and the West Country: Samuel Coleridge, Robert Southey, Robert Lovell, Jane Austen, Mary Shelley, and Thomas Hardy. It looks at both the importance of place to these writers and the importance of the writers to the culture and economy of the region today.  

MOOC – Robert Burns: Poems, Song, and Legacy
Opening soon, this free course from the Centre for Robert Burns Studies, University of Glasgow, will introduce you to the life, works and global celebrity of Robert Burns. You’ll examine poems, songs, manuscripts, and objects used to commemorate the poet. You’ll also develop your understanding of Robert Burns’s posthumous reputation – from Burns Suppers and Burns Night through to Hogmanay.

ONLINE COURSES: VIDEOS

Resources from Wordsworth and Humphry Davy FutureLearn online courses:

Video: How did the Lake District inspire William Wordsworth’s poem ‘Michael’?

Video: Explore Dove Cottage – once home to Dorothy and William Wordsworth

Video: Dorothy Wordsworth’s Journal 3rd September 1800

Video: Wordsworth’s ‘Boat Stealing’

Video: Humphry Davy: Laughing Gas, Literature and the Lamp

Video: Overview of Davy’s Life

Video: Davy’s Nitrous Oxide Experiments

Video: Davy Among the Poets I 

Video: Davy Among the Poets II 

THE BARS BLOG

Several resources can also be found here on the BARS Blog, including:

The ‘Archive Spotlight’ series
Blog posts from researchers documenting their experiences of using an archive to look at Romanticism-related materials.

The ‘Five Questions’ series
Authors of new monographs discuss their research in Romanticism.

The ‘On This Day’ series
Blog posts celebrating the 200th anniversary of literary and historical events of the Romantic period.

The ‘Romantic Reimaginings’ series
A series of blogs that seeks to explore the ways in which texts of the Romantic era continue to resonate.

OPEN ACCESS MONOGRAPHS

Charlotte Smith and the Sonnet by Bethan Roberts

Jane Austen Speaks Norwegian: The Challenges of Literary Translation by Marie N. Sørbø

Irony and Idyll: Jane Austen’s Pride and Prejudice and Mansfield Park on Screen by Marie N. Sørbø (eBook)

A list of recent Romanticism publications can be found here (via K-SAA).

OTHER FILM/VIDEO

‘Byron and Greece: A Poet’s Fight for Freedom’
A documentary about Byron’s last journey (free with a subscription to Amazon Prime).

Shelley’s The Cenci
As performed on Dec. 4, 2019 in London, Ontario (a #Romantics200 event). The theatre program at Western University staged this production of Shelley’s play from December 4-7 2019 at TAPS: The Arts Project Centre for Creativity.

Call to share online resources

We hope all friends of BARS are keeping well in these challenging times. BARS Communications is seeking to develop our online community and conversations during this difficult, isolating period. Do you have any recommendations for online resources, related to teaching/research in Romanticism, that you think could be useful for members and followers of BARS? If so, please send ideas for bulletins to: britishassociationromantic@gmail.com and we will circulate a collated list via email and on social media. 

You can join the BARS community on Twitter (@BARS_Official), and on Facebook by searching for ‘British Association for Romantic Studies’.

– Anna Mercer (Communications Officer)

Jane Austen: Myth, Reality and Global Celebrity – Free, Online, Course

A message below from Gillian Dow, Vice-President of BARS.

Dear Colleagues,

The free, online, course Jane Austen: Myth, Reality and Global Celebrity – designed by me and colleagues at the University of Southampton – first ran via FutureLearn in early 2018, and started its 6th run yesterday, 16th March 2020. I draw it to your attention now, because I am aware that many of our community are moving to online teaching and learning in the light of COVID-19 coronavirus restrictions, and that you may be looking for online resources for your students. Do encourage them to sign up – there are learning activities focusing on Austen and her novels, but also sections that present extracts from Mary Wollstonecraft and Hannah More on female education, early biographies and translations of Austen, as well as material on adaptation and more. There are learning activities that use a variety of online resources, and many videos filmed at both Chawton House and the Jane Austen House museum and beyond.

https://www.futurelearn.com/courses/jane-austen

I’ve been thinking about Humberstall in Rudyard Kipling’s “The Janeites” – “There’s no one to touch Jane when you’re in a tight place”. Although we do our best to complicate ideas of the cosy, domestic ‘Jane’ on the course, it’s clear from the first day of this run of the course that many of our current participants are seeking diversion and online company in difficult times, and that reading/re-reading Austen might help.

Best wishes to all,

Gillian Dow

University of Southampton, Vice-President of BARS

Stephen Copley Research Awards 2020

The BARS Executive Committee has established these bursaries in order to support postgraduate and early-career research within the UK. They are intended to help fund expenses incurred through travel to libraries and archives necessary to the student’s research. As anticipated, this year we received a large number of applications, many of which were of a very high quality indeed. Please do join us in congratulating the very worthy winners. Romanticism is alive and kicking, we’re pleased to say!

•       Hadi Baghaei-Abchooyeh (Swansea University)
•       Amy Louise Blaney (Keele University)
•       Ellen Bulford Welch (University of Sheffield)
•       Roger Hansford (Independent Scholar)
•       Annise Rogers (University of Lincoln)
•       Natalie Tal Harries (Independent Scholar)

Once they have completed their research trips each winner will write a brief report on their projects. These will be published on the website and circulated through our social media. For more information about the bursaries, including reports from past winners, please visit our website.

Daniel Cook
Bursaries Officer, BARS
University of Dundee
d.p.cook@dundee.ac.uk

Call for Expressions of Interest: BARS 2023 INTERNATIONAL BIENNIAL CONFERENCE

Deadline: 23 February 2020

Send your EoI to Jennifer Orr (Jennifer.Orr@newcastle.ac.uk)

THE BRITISH ASSOCIATION FOR ROMANTIC STUDIES is pleased to invite Expressions of Interest for the 2023 International Biennial Conference. The last two BARS conferences (York 2017 and Nottingham 2019) were very successful, and we will be co-hosting a large conference with the North American Society for the Study of Romanticism at Edge Hill University in Summer 2021.

Since 2015, attendance at BARS conferences has grown to around 250 and delegate feedback has been very positive. We are very much looking forward to working with institutions in continuing to build on and to diversify the successful BARS model. Please consult the programmes for Cardiff, York and Nottingham as guides for your proposal.

A decision will be made by the BARS Executive at its next meeting in March 2020 and the successful applicants will be invited to submit a report for the following Executive meeting, which will be held electronically in July 2020. The successful applicants will also be expected to make a presentation at the next conference, Edge Hill 2021.

Host institutions are expected to take account of the following in preparing their Expressions of Interest:

Venue location, capacity and accessibility

We expect numbers could range between 250 to 275 delegates: please bear this figure in mind when bidding. You will need a plenary lecture hall large enough to accommodate these numbers, plus a sufficient number of breakout rooms and catering facilities (BARS conferences can normally have around ten parallel sessions). For North American colleagues in particular, the distance from a major airport and transport links will be an important factor, so please bear this in mind.

We expect organizers to offer a range of accommodation from traditional student-type lodgings through to hotel-level facilities. Sufficient cheaper accommodation to allow postgraduate participation is desirable: such accommodation should be within reasonable walking distance of the conference venue or the organizers should make suitable travel arrangements to take delegates to and from the venue.

The venue is expected to meet the usual requirements for facilities in academic meetings, including Wi-Fi and PowerPoint/projection facilities in all rooms. It is desirable that the meeting rooms are in reasonably close proximity to each other and that there is a communal meeting area or foyer, preferably with refreshment facilities so that delegates can socialize and browse publisher stands.

In order to comply with BARS’s commitment to equality, diversity and inclusion, conference organizers should ensure that the venue, accommodation and transportation are fully accessible.

Conference theme

This should be of sufficient scope and significance to allow the Association’s members to take part. Recent themes have been ‘Romantic Imprints’, ‘Romantic Improvement’, ‘Romantic Facts and Fantasies’ and ‘New Romantics’. The full list of previous conferences can be found on the BARS website.

Timetable

The conference has typically run from Thursday to Sunday in the second half of July, with the conference commencing on the afternoon of the first day and finishing on Sunday afternoon. However, this is a flexible schedule and proposers are encouraged to deviate from this model, for instance proposing a Monday-to-Thursday event (indeed, BARS 2021 will be running from Tuesday to Friday).

The BARS Executive normally meet on the evening before the conference begins: organizers will need to arrange a suitable venue for this (two-hour) meeting. The meeting typically concludes with a short tour of the conference venue for the Executive members in attendance. In fixing on a date, it is especially important organizers should check which conferences are already scheduled for what is often a busy time in the calendar and liaise with conference and society chairs in order to avoid clashes wherever possible and facilitate attendance at all events. Conferences which run during summers and are likely to be attended by BARS delegates include those hosted by the British Association for Victorian Studies, the International Conference on Romanticism, the International Gothic Association, the International Society for Eighteenth-Century Studies and the North American Society for the Study of Romanticism.

The CFP is usually circulated by October of the preceding year (2022) and the outcome of the refereeing process confirming speakers is usually made by the middle of January.

Vetting of papers

It is usual for members of the BARS Executive to serve on the panel which referees the proposals for panel papers, though the local organizers have the final right of veto. (It is desirable that papers are refereed not only for the integrity of the event, but also to help delegates secure financial support from funding bodies and institutions.)

Programme

The programme usually takes the form of parallel sessions consisting of panels where delegates deliver 20-minute papers. BARS welcomes convened and themed panels that reflect cutting-edge projects and collaborative research, and other formats such as roundtables and workshops. In addition, there are usually four or five plenary lectures, one of which is designated the Stephen Copley Lecture and another the Marilyn Butler lecture in memory of BARS’s founding members and much-loved scholars. Plenaries are chosen by the local organizing committee, though BARS expects this to reflect a gender balance and a mixture of national and international scholars. In the arrangements of the panel sessions and the timing of the plenary lectures the organizers are asked to consider seriously the responsibility of offering all speakers a reasonable size of audience (it is now standard practice to end the conference on the final day with a keynote). BARS expects panels to incorporate postgraduate and early career researchers opportunities alongside more established academics. The programme should also include specific sessions targeted at professional development for ECRs.

Reception, Book Prize, Banquet, PGR/ECR reception

The BARS conference includes a reception (normally on the first night), a slot for the BARS First Book Prize awards (this can be done at the reception or can be separate), and a banquet on the third night. It has increasingly been the case that informal meals are offered on the second night, although this depends on local factors such as whether the conference venue is campus-based or near a well-provisioned civic centre. Payment for the banquet is optional and can be purchased during registration. There should also be an evening slot for a reception aimed specifically at postgraduate and early career researchers: this typically takes the form of informal drinks and/or dinner, and often runs on the second night but should not be scheduled against the Banquet, in case PGRs/ECRs wish to attend.

Refreshments and lunches 

BARS expects the conference registration fee to include refreshments (before the first sessions each day and regular 30-minute coffee breaks), buffet food for the reception, and lunches on Days 2 to 4 (one of these can be a brown bag lunch on the excursion day). Please build this into your costs.

Conference excursion

It is usual to arrange an excursion or choice of excursions with laid-on transport within the schedule, to take place usually on the Saturday (i.e. Day 3) afternoon, and to a ‘Romantic’ venue with general relevance to the conference e.g. a museum, estate, birthplace, gallery. We are keen to explore offering the excursion on another day (e.g. the final day of the conference, or before the main activity of the conference commences), for reasons of inclusivity. The excursion is always an optional extra in terms of costings and can be purchased during registration.

Biennial General Meeting

The conference organizers are required to find a central time (at least one hour, which can be the lunch hour) within the schedule to host the BARS BGM. Key aspects of the BGM are: presentation of reports from the Executive to Membership; election of the new BARS Executive for 2023–2025; presentations on the PGR/ECR conference in 2024 and BARS 2025.

Cost

Organizers are asked to keep costs as low as possible without compromising the quality of the event. Please provide as much information as you can about the predicted registration fee, including a day rate and discounted rates for PGRs, ECRs, retired and unwaged, as well as whether you propose to include discounted ‘early bird’ rates. In order to maximize inclusion, day rates must feature as part of the package offered to delegates.

BARS is willing to provide an appropriate level of support to its international conference; any profits are expected to be shared 50/50 with BARS. 

The selection committee strongly encourages proposers to include indicative budgets with projected income and costings, in order to confirm the event’s viability and affordability for delegates.

Liaison

Organizers will maintain contact with the BARS Executive throughout the planning process. This is usually managed by the co-option of a local organizer onto the BARS Executive for a period of two or more years. A delegation from BARS will also make a site visit in 2021 or 2022 to check through logistics, run through the programme and offer general advice. The BARS Executive will also approve the final programme.

Recipients of the BARS/Wordsworth Trust Early Career Fellowship 2020

BARS and The Wordsworth Trust are delighted to announce that two fellowships have been awarded for 2020.

We received a number of excellent applications, and the two Early Career Researchers taking up the fellowships in 2020 are:

Dr Alexis Wolf

Dr Francesca Mackenney

Congratulations to Alexis and Francesca, and on behalf of everyone at BARS and the Wordsworth Trust, thank you to all those who applied.

The Fellowship invites ECRs to work with Jeff Cowton (Curator and Head of Learning) during one of the most exciting and transformative times in the Wordsworth Trust’s history. The major HLF-funded project ‘Reimagining Wordsworth’ is due for completion in time to celebrate Wordsworth’s 250th birthday on 7 April 2020. The Wordsworth Trust is committed to embracing the Creative Case for Diversity and believe that by welcoming a wide range of influences, practices and perspectives, we can better understand the collection in Grasmere and the stories it can tell, thereby enriching public programmes. The purpose of this Fellowship is to help the Trust to achieve just that – to examine the collection from a different perspective, and to use that perspective and knowledge to help audiences better understand and engage with Wordsworth’s life and work.

Read more about the fellowships here.

We look forward to hearing the outcomes of the fellowships undertaken by Alexis and Francesca. Reports from both successful applicants will be posted on the BARS Blog.

– Anna Mercer (Communications Officer)

 

Cardiff Romanticism and Eighteenth-Century Seminar – 2020 Spring Programme

All are welcome to attend the following events at Cardiff University in early 2020.

All events are free, and start at 6pm in room 2.47, John Percival Building, Cardiff University, CF10 3EG.

18 Feb Dr Lizzy Spencer (University of York) ‘Women, accounting, and intertextuality in England c.1680-1830’

9 Mar Prof Tim Webb (University of Bristol) ‘Leigh Hunt and Romantic Imprisonment’

16 Mar Prof David Duff (Queen Mary, University of London) ‘Coleridge as Prospectus-Writer’

20 Apr Prof Nick Roe (St Andrews) ‘The Rise of Biography in the Eighteenth Century’

Talks are 45-50 minutes followed by questions. Refreshments are provided.

Please direct any enquiries to Anna Mercer (Mercera1@cardiff.ac.uk), and visit the CRECS Blog for updates.

CfP: NASSR 2020 Conference at the University of Toronto

A notice about NASSR 2020 from Terry F. Robinson

Dear BARS Colleagues:

Greetings! You are invited to submit a proposal for the 28th Annual Conference of the North American Society for the Study of Romanticism (NASSR). The NASSR conference, which will bring together 300-400 scholars to discuss literature, philosophy, art, and culture c. 1770-1840, will take place at the University of Toronto, Ontario on August 6-9, 2020.

CONFERENCE WEBSITE

Keynote Speakers:
Elizabeth Maddock Dillon (Northeastern University)
Martin Myrone (Tate Britain)

Topics may include (but are not limited to):

  • Re-envisioning Romanticism: looking back and looking forward
  • Visions and the visionary: perception, prognostication, projection, speculation, the speculative
  • Ways of looking: reading, conceptualizing, observing, peeping, gazing, categorizing, examining, recognizing and misrecognizing
  • Visual culture, philosophy, and aesthetics: objects of sight, spectacle, the spectacular, the sublime and the beautiful
  • Reading methods and histories: careful, close, distant, surface; plagiarism, copyright law
  • Print culture in its social, theoretical, and physical aspects (e.g. text, design, structure, layout); manuscripts, letters, journals, scrapbooks, books, journals, newspapers
  • The seen and the unseen: noumena, phenomena, the spirit world, apparitions and appearances
  • Romantic iconoclasm and anti-representationalism; ocularcentrism and “the tyranny of the eye”
  • Visual communication: text, numbers, notation (e.g. musical), images, sign language, placards, banners, flags, gestures, hieroglyphs, emblems, insignia
  • Questions of form and representation
  • Fashionable looking: costume, hair, makeup, manner, style, taste, places to see and be seen
  • Visualizing gender and sexuality: identity, performance, politics
  • Visual and scenic arts: sculpture, painting, illustration, graphic satire, print shops, pornography, broadsheets, dioramas, panoramas, architectural and landscape design
  • Theatre and performing arts: set design, lighting, visual effects, costume, body movement, dance, pantomime, attitudes, tableaux vivants
  • Art collection and assessment: museums and curation, connoisseurship, formal and evaluative concerns (e.g. light, color, pattern, shape, scale, proportion)
  • Visualizing class: social hierarchies and signifiers (e.g. clothing, heraldry, pageantry), occupational and economic segregation
  • Instruments of looking: lenses, spectacles, quizzing glasses, spy glasses, Claude glasses, prisms, mirrors, telescopes, microscopes, orreries, windows
  • Forms of illumination and darkness: lightning, electricity, candlelight, lamps, gas light, spotlights, limelight, torches, fireworks; shade, shadow, twilight, gloom, obscurity
  • Religious vision(s): prophecy, revelation, enthusiasm, sermons and hymns, public and private devotion, natural and revealed religion
  • The science of the eye: vision, optics, visual anatomy, medicine, pathology, disability, blindness
  • Data visualization (e.g. land, economy, population studies): mapping, cartography, geography, geolocation, charts, diagrams, categorization, numerical and pictorial statistics
  • Visualizing race: slavery, racism, racialization, minoritization
  • Vision and ecopoetics: seeing nature (vistas, prospects, the picturesque); noticing and reading features of land, water, and sky; watching weather and recognizing climate; the animal gaze
  • Envisioning space and place: the local and the global, home and abroad, the peripheral and transperipheral
  • Envisioning (the ends of) empire: imperialism, colonialism, sites and sights of war; decolonization, indigenization
  • Political and military forecasting, strategy, optics, campaigns, battlegrounds, political theatre
  • Imagining the future of Romanticism; strategizing its work in the humanities, in the university, and in society

EMAIL CONTACT: nassr2020vision@gmail.com

**The deadline for general submissions is 24 January 2020.**

We look forward to receiving your proposals!

Sincerely Yours,
Terry F. Robinson (and on behalf of John Savarese and the NASSR 2020 conference committee)