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BARS Blog

News and Commentary from the British Association for Romantic Studies

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Wordsworth Annual Lecture 2017: Byron and Wordsworth

Please see below for details of the Wordsworth Annual Lecture 2017, to be held in London on Halloween.

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Byron and Wordsworth: Art and Nature

Tuesday 31 October, 6.00 – 7.00pm

The 2017 London Lecture with Professor Sir Drummond Bone

Wordsworth and Byron fell out in a not very dignified way over politics, and there was heavy co-lateral damage in their opinion of each other’s poetry. But there was a fundamental intellectual difference too. Despite his flirtation with Wordsworthean pantheism at P B Shelley’s behest in 1816, Byron came to believe that moral and existential value could only be human constructs, whereas Wordsworth of course saw these very constructs as the barrier to an existential value inherent in Nature, the perception of which was the necessary ground of moral behaviour. Sir Drummond Bone will use this contrast as a way into reading their poetry, and spend some time specifically on their differing attitudes to city life and the nature of art.

Sir Drummond Bone graduated from Glasgow University, and was a Snell Exhibitioner at Balliol from 1968 to 1972. He is an acknowledged expert on the poetry of Byron and is President of the Scottish Byron Society. He became Professor of English Literature and Dean of the Faculty of Arts at the University of Glasgow, Principal of Royal Holloway and Bedford New College in the University of London, Vice-Chancellor of the University of Liverpool, and President of Universities UK. He has been Master of Balliol since 2011. In Trinity Term 2016, he was appointed a Pro-Vice-Chancellor of Oxford University.

Following the lecture will be a drinks reception that all are welcome to attend.

Chancellor’s Hall, Senate House, Malet Street, London, WC1E 7HU

To RSVP please contact Hannah Stratton at the Wordsworth Trust on 015394 63520 or email h.stratton@wordsworth.org.uk.

“Frankenreads” – An international celebration of the 200th anniversary of Mary Shelley’s novel

Please see below for an announcement from Prof. Neil Fraistat (University of Maryland). The Frankenstein celebrations next year are likely to be numerous, and this sounds like a particularly exciting international initiative devoted to promoting the iconic and ever-fascinating novel by Mary Shelley.

Image taken from Frankenreads.org

Image taken from Frankenreads.org

Frankenreads

“Dear all,

As you know, the year 2018 marks the 200th anniversary of the publication of Mary Shelley’s Frankenstein, a seminal literary work that, since its appearance, has influenced millions of people across the globe. Frankenstein is a rare work of fiction in that it appeals to both novice and expert readers alike, readers who represent both the breadth of human diversity and a range of disciplinary interests and backgrounds. It is a work that remains relevant to contemporary cultural debates concerning issues ranging from biomedical technologies and the ethical questions they raise to misperceptions and misrepresentations of the Other and their impact on our shared humanity. Frankenstein sparks imagination and critical thinking about the human experience, and thus it is perhaps no surprise that it is the most widely taught literary text in the USA and the fifth most widely taught book from any discipline.

To commemorate the bicentennial of the novel and also to harness its power to generate and inspire communities of readers, the Keats-Shelley Association of America (K-SAA) in partnership with the National Endowment for the Humanities is launching “Frankenreads”: a “Bloomsday”-style, national/international public reading of Frankenstein on October 31, 2018. We hope to:

  • engage an international community, including but not limited to North America, Latin America, Europe, Africa, and Asia Pacific in related activities centering on the novel;
  • to make this community visible globally as a community through shared branding and social media;
  • to livestream a public reading of Frankenstein to be held in Washington, D.C. for those around the world who are unable to attend one in person;
  • to facilitate bringing regional experts of the novel to such events as lectures, discussions, and film showings held at local libraries and community centers;
  • to hold in the days leading up to Frankenreads an international “Week of Frankenstein,” during which students, teachers, and the public could hold Frankenstein related events and contribute their thoughts, images, and short videos about Frankenstein to a collective blog.

We now invite you now to join our core group of over 40 universities and libraries from 10 countries by involving your university, local library, or community center in participating.

To read more about strategies for hosting an event, see a select list of related resources, and to register your own event, go to our dedicated website: frankenreads.org.

We hope you will be joining us as host or participant!”

 

Staging Nineteenth-Century Melodrama at the Georgian Theatre Royal

Staging Nineteenth-Century Melodrama at the Georgian Theatre Royal

The Fortress on the Danube is being performed at the Georgian Theatre Royal, Yorkshire, on Friday 25 August, 7.30pm. Director: Sarah Wynne Kordas; Musical Director: Diane Tisdall; Dramaturge: Sarah Burdett. Tickets can be purchased here.

By Sarah Burdett (University of Warwick)
For the past five months, I have been working as a Post-Doctoral Research Fellow at the University of Warwick on the exciting practice-based research project ‘Staging Napoleonic Theatre’. The project, led by Dr Katherine Astbury, and funded by the AHRC, has involved staging two nineteenth-century French melodramas in translation. Roseliska, a melodrama of 1811, written and performed by French prisoners of war at Portchester Castle, was revived at the site of its original production in July 2017; and La Forteresse du Danube, (translated as The Fortress), by prolific French playwright Guilbert Pixerécourt, initially staged at the Théatre de la Porte Saint-Martin in 1805, is being revived at the Georgian Theatre Royal, Richmond, on 25 August 2017. One down, one to go!

 

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As a British theatre historian who has spent the last four years hunched over manuscripts of Georgian play-texts in dark and silent libraries, the experience of bringing these scripts back to life in my role as dramaturge – of furnishing them with the spectacular and aural vibrancy that the written text alone cannot provide – has been both exhilarating and enlightening. Recent Romantic theatre scholarship has stressed the need for the play text to be read alongside its visual, aural and oral elements, in order for its theatrical impact to be adequately comprehended. Nowhere is this statement more true than in relation to the nineteenth-century melodrama, as I have discovered first hand while working on this project.

 
Popularised in both France and Britain in the aftermath of the French Revolution, the melodrama sought to provide entertainment emotionally powerful enough to stimulate the minds of a public traumatised by the recent violence in France. In order to achieve this, the genre fully exploited all that the nineteenth-century theatre, its actors and musicians, had to offer in terms of scenic and musical extravagance. As well as making full use of advancements in technology, which enabled the inclusion in melodramatic performances of explosions formed by fireworks, and naval battles performed on flooded stages, the melodrama’s elaborate spectacle was enhanced by a style of acting that consisted of large and elaborate gestures. In the melodrama, nothing is left concealed. Characters are open books whose emotions are externalised clearly and unambiguously through the use of entirely demonstrative gesticulations, movements, and facial expressions. Bodies do the talking: they tell us what characters are thinking and feeling without the need for monologues. Essentially, the body surpasses the script in terms of emotional expression.

 
The emotional intensity enabled by this expressive style of acting is strongly accentuated by the use of stirring, provocative music. Melodramatic music, provided by an orchestra, plays an integral function in shaping audiences’ responses to the scenes exhibited on stage. Like the actor’s body, music provides another form of non-verbal communication. As well as serving to enable sound effects for occurrences including dramatic storms and battles, music can also anticipate forthcoming events, hark back to previous scenes, magnify a character’s inner thoughts, accentuate externalised feelings, and encourage audiences when to cheer, when to boo, and when to remain silent. Lengthy interludes of instrumental music often accompany moments of high drama within melodramatic performances. Actors move in sync to the orchestra’s music, creating scenes that, while entirely lacking words, and therefore occupying little space in the play text, can last for a good three to four minutes when exhibited on the stage. The melodrama, therefore, becomes an entirely different beast when experienced in the theatre, than it does when confined to the page.

 

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How then do you go about reviving a nineteenth-century melodrama to be staged before a twenty-first century audience? This is the question that myself and the Staging Napoleonic Theatre team continue to grapple with as we approach our performance of The Fortress at the Georgian Theatre Royal. One of the biggest challenges we experienced when staging the first of our two melodramas, Roseliska, was encouraging modern day performers to act in a manner that they considered at first to be grossly over the top. With twenty-first century acting styles being dominated by the influences of Stanislavski and naturalism, it is entirely unsurprising that melodramatic techniques tend not to sit too comfortably with twenty-first century actors. To accommodate this, we have been working with our performers on exercises revolving around mime and tableaux. These were largely inspired by the wonderful collection of essays published in the special edition of Nineteenth Century Theatre and Film (Winter, 2002), edited by Gilli Bush-Bailey and Jackie Bratton, documenting the process of reviving melodramas by nineteenth-century British playwright Jane Scott, as part of the ‘Jane Scott Project’. I drew heavily on Dick McCaw’s essay in this collection, on training actors for melodrama, at the workshop/audition we held at the Georgian Theatre Royal back in June, from which we acquired our Fortress cast.

 

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To kick off the workshop, we had each of our participants describe how there morning had been thus far, in the form of mime. The exercise got participants thinking immediately about how to express themselves physically, using entirely non-verbal signs. Scheduling this as the first activity of the day, and using it as much to introduce participants to one another, as to get them thinking about melodramatic techniques, the exercise also quickly banished any inhibitions that the actors might have held about externalising their feelings in this peculiar manner, in front of a group of strangers. We then moved on to look at how narratives might be formed using freeze frames. Entirely pilfering McCaw’s ‘Every Picture Tells a Story’ exercise, I gave our actors the task of acting out popular nursery rhymes in small groups, using a series of tableaux. These tableaux were then put into motion, creating a fluid sequence of movements. This exercise built on the opening ice-breaker, by encouraging actors to think about how they might go from conveying one very specific emotion/action to another, without allowing the narrative they are creating to become staccato. Fluidity of movement and of emotional expression are crucial skills for melodramatic actors. As I hinted previously, actors are often required to convey an entire series of emotions within the space of a single piece of music. Therefore, the ability to shift swiftly, coherently, and melodiously from one clearly defined pose to another, is a technique that must be mastered.

 

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Accordingly, a lot of our workshop was devoted to musicality. Our musical director, Dr Diane Tisdall, played tunes on her violin from the original Forteresse score, and our actors were tasked with the challenge of responding to these tunes in character. Music was shown to play an incredibly authoritative role in determining the manner in which the actors interpreted the character they were playing. At one point in The Fortress, the lieutenant Olivier is faced with a moral dilemma: should he obey love or duty? While he silently contemplates this choice on stage, orchestral music helps to externalise his feelings. At the workshop, we experimented with changing the pace and tempo of this music. We found that doing so had a profound impact on the way that the role of Olivier was played. When the music was at its slowest, actors tended to play Olivier as a mournful, indecisive, and somewhat self-pitying character, distraught at the prospect of having to make such an unfair decision. When the music was at its fastest however, Olivier was shown to deal quickly with the emotional turmoil caused by the conflict, and to reach a frantic but firm resolution by the time that the music had ceased. This exercise indicated to our actors the collaborative role played by composers, musicians, and performers, in dictating the narrative’s meaning.

 

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We went on to introduce our actors to popular nineteenth-century acting manuals including Henry Siddons’s Practical Illustrations of Rhetorical Gesture, and the anonymously written Thespian Preceptor. These manuals offer visual and verbal descriptions of the ways in which certain emotions were externalised by performers on the nineteenth-century stage. While by no means offering prescriptive guides, the manuals provide valuable insight into the expressiveness of the poses, gestures, and facial expressions conveyed by performers of the time. Reviews of nineteenth-century melodramas printed in contemporary British newspapers, periodicals, diaries and letters have also been shared with performers. One brilliantly fun review of a melodrama staged in London in 1832 pokes fun at an actor’s incessant use of his arms, by comparing them to the sails of a windmill! This review was particularly helpful in assuring our modern day actors that, despite how ostentatious their gestures might feel, they are entirely in keeping with melodramatic extravagance.

 

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This week the Staging Napoleonic Theatre team is up in Richmond, Yorkshire, ahead of our performance of the Fortress at the Georgian Theatre Royal on Friday 25 August. For this performance, we are working with a community cast, many of whom had never heard of Pixerécourt prior to their involvement in the play, but have quickly become experts in the dramatic genre that he pioneered. Following the fantastic reception that Roseliska received when performed at Portchester castle last month, we have discovered that there is definitely still a place for nineteenth-century melodrama on the twenty-first century stage. And what better stage to perform this on, than that of the country’s oldest working Georgian theatre, upon whose boards the likes of Sarah Siddons, Edmund Kean, and William McCready have previously stood? So, if you’re still wondering how one might go about reviving a nineteenth-century melodrama for a twenty-first century audience, come along and see for yourselves! We’d love to hear your thoughts!

Two-day symposium: ‘Byron Among the Poets’

Please see below for an announcement from Matthew Ward (University of Birmingham).

 

‘Byron Among the Poets’

A symposium at All Souls College, University of Oxford

Saturday 13th – Sunday 14th January 2018

 

Registrations are invited for a two-day symposium on Lord Byron’s literary relationships to poets from Virgil to Auden. In a series of papers by leading scholars, we will be mapping out the range and richness of Byron’s connectivity: what other poets meant to him, and what he meant to those who came after. Join us to explore the ways Byron might be thought to be – perhaps more than most – ‘among’ the poets: alluding and alluded to; collaborative; competitive; parodied; worked and reworked in canons, anthologies and editions. Papers will focus on the contours of individual literary relationships (what did Byron get from Pope? how did Eliot read Byron?), as well as exploring larger questions about the nature of poetic exchange, technical influence and generic formation.

Speakers: Dr Clare Bucknell (Oxford), Dr Madeleine Callaghan (Sheffield), Dr Anna Camilleri (Oxford), Professor Richard Cronin (Glasgow), Professor Nicholas Halmi (Oxford), Professor Simon Kövesi (Oxford Brookes), Dr Tom Lockwood (Birmingham), Professor Michael O’Neill (Durham), Dr Fred Parker (Cambridge), Professor Seamus Perry (Oxford), Professor Christopher Ricks (Boston), Professor Jane Stabler (St Andrews), Dr Matthew Ward (Birmingham), Dr Ross Wilson (Cambridge), Mr Andrew Wynn Owen (Oxford).

Registration is free and includes lunch on both days. To express your interest, or for further details, please email the convenors Clare Bucknell and Matthew Ward at byronsymposium2018@gmail.com. The closing date for registrations is December 1st.

Austen at 200: A Series of Events, York, 2017

Please see below for the details of an exciting programme of events to celebrate 200 years since the death of Jane Austen. Contact: Alison O’Byrne (University of York).

 

AUSTEN AT 200

 

A series of events to commemorate Jane Austen’s writing and her legacy marking the 200th anniversary of her death. Presented by the University of York in partnership with City Screen, the South Bank Community Cinema, York Festival of Ideas, and Fairfax House.

 

Jane Austen by Cassandra Austen, pencil and watercolour, circa 1810. National Portrait Gallery, London.

Jane Austen by Cassandra Austen, pencil and watercolour, circa 1810. National Portrait Gallery, London.

 

Wednesday 24 May

Love and Friendship film screening with discussion, City Screen 6:15

Followed by Austen: Literature, Film …or History?

Join us for a screening of Whit Stillman’s 2016 adaptation of Jane Austen’s Lady Susan, followed by a lively discussion with Emma Major (English, York), Erica Sheen (English, York), and Catriona Kennedy (History, York).   Tickets available through City Screen website.

 

Friday 26 May

Clueless film screening with introduction, South Bank Community Cinema at Clements Hall, 7.00

Amy Heckerling’s 1995 adaptation of Jane Austen’s Emma, introduced by adaptation specialist Suzanne Spiedel (Sheffield Hallam University), with Erica Sheen (York).   Tickets at the door or contact the cinema.

 

Tuesday 30 May

Centre for Eighteenth Century Studies Annual Stephen Copley Lecture, Huntingdon Room, King’s Manor 5.00

Kathryn Sutherland (Oxford):   Austen as Wartime Novelist

Austen’s popular and critical reception through much of the twentieth century was built on her seeming ignorance of public events, well described by Marilyn Butler as a ‘discreet’ approach to ideas. But just how discreet was she? Kathryn Sutherland presents an account of Austen’s commitment to recording events from the perspective of everyday reality, and argues that it is time to reclaim her as the first English novelist to explore the effect of contemporary war on the home front. This event is free; no tickets required.

 

Thursday 8 June, Festival of Ideas

British Society for Eighteenth-Century Studies Patron’s Lecture, Berrick Saul Building, University of York 6.00

John Mullan (UCL): What Matters in Jane Austen

Which important Jane Austen characters never speak? What do the characters call one another, and why? What are the right and wrong ways to propose marriage? Join John Mullan of University College London for this British Society for Eighteenth-Century Studies Patron’s Lecture as he asks and answers some very specific questions about what goes on in Austen’s novels, revealing the inner workings of their greatness.  Sponsored by the British Society for Eighteenth-Century Studies.

Tickets free from York Festival of Ideas (01904 324119).

 

Thursday 8 June, Festival of Ideas

Roundtable discussion, Berrick Saul Building, University of York 7:15-8:45

The Enduring Appeal of Jane Austen

With Bharat Tandon (UEA), Emma Major (York) and Deborah Yaffe (author of Among the Janeites), chaired by Alison O’Byrne (York)

What is Jane Austen’s legacy and why does her work continue to enjoy such popularity? Following John Mullan’s lecture, join our panel of experts and enthusiasts as they explore all things Austen: the enduring appeal of her novels, the fascination with the life of the author, the ways in which her novels have been adapted and reworked, and the many aspects of Austen fandom.

Tickets free from York Festival of Ideas (01904 324119).

 

Sunday 11 June

Illustrated talk and discussion, South Bank Community at Clements Hall, 7.00

Historians at work

Historian Hannah Greig (York) discusses and illustrates her work as historical consultant on films and tv including Death Comes to Pemberley, The Duchess and Poldark.

Tickets at the door or contact the cinema.

 

Wednesday 14 June

Sense and Sensibility film screening with discussion: City Screen 6:00

Austen: Film…or Literature?

Join us for a screening of Ang Lee’s 1995 film, nominated for seven Academy Awards (including Best Adapted Screenplay win for Emma Thompson), followed by a lively debate with experts from the Departments of Theatre, Film, and Television and English and Related Literature at York. Screenwriter Simon van der Borgh and JT Welsch put the case for Film; Mary Fairclough and Alison O’Byrne respond on behalf of Literature. Chaired by Michael McCluskey.

Tickets available from the City Screen website.

 

Friday 30 June

Fairfax House Public Lecture, Fairfax House 7:00*

Hilary Davidson: “Recreating Jane Austen’s Silk Pelisse-Coat”

What did Jane Austen wear? The only known garment associated with the beloved author is a brown silk pelisse-coat in the collection of Hampshire Council. Like a detective story, a project to recreate the pelisse allowed a rich investigation into the history, context and physical qualities of the coat, and revealed new information about the object – and the wearer.

Tickets available from Fairfax House.

 

Friday 14 July

Fairfax House Public Lecture, Fairfax House 7:00*

Emma Major (York): “Pictures of perfection…make me sick and wicked”: Jane Austen and Reading for Lies

As Austen wrote to her niece Fanny Knight, whose admirer had criticized the comportment of Austen’s heroines: ‘Pictures of Perfection, as you know, make me sick and wicked’. In this lecture, Emma Major (York) looks at the ways in which Austen encourages us to be suspicious of perfection, and to become better readers of character. Indeed the case could be made that Austen’s fiction offers the reader a first-rate lesson in detective skills. As P.D. James points out, detective fiction ‘does not require a murder’ but ‘does require a mystery’ – and as we’ll see, Austen provides plenty of these, continuing to inspire crime fiction writers of today. This investigation of Austen’s lifelong fascination with letters shows how Austen uses them to teach her heroines to become better readers of flawed human nature.

Tickets available from Fairfax House.

 

Organizers: Alison O’Byrne (alison.obyrne@york.ac.uk) and Erica Sheen (erica.sheen@york.ac.uk)

* Organized by Fairfax House

Call for Participants: Institutions of Literature, 1700-1900

Please see below for a call for participants for a series of workshops exploring eighteenth- and nineteenth-century literary institutions.  These form part of an AHRC-funded network (‘Institutions of Literature, 1700-1900’) that I’m running with Jon Mee.  If you’re a scholar working in this area, or a curator working with eighteenth- or nineteenth-century collections, we’d love to hear from you.  The network also has its own site, on which further details can be found.

The AHRC-funded ‘Institutions of Literature, 1700-1900’ research network is pleased to invite expressions of interest from scholars working on the histories and practices of eighteenth- and nineteenth-century institutions and from stakeholders and curators who work in surviving institutions originating from this period.  During 2017, the network will run workshops in Glasgow, London and York and conduct a series of online discussions in order to explore collaboratively the ways in which the literary institutions of this era arose and operated.  The network will also consider the ongoing consequences of eighteenth- and nineteenth-century institutional practices and interventions for twenty-first-century institutions.

Between 1700 and 1900, institutions came to play integral roles in literary culture: teaching people how to value writing; providing sites for discussion and networks for circulation; serving as archival repositories; raising and disbursing money; inventing new genres; distributing laurels and condemnations; and authoring works and conducting readings.  However, these important mediations have hitherto been underexplored, in large part due to the scale of institutions’ operations.  Institutional histories tend to be more difficult to map than the histories of prominent individuals.  They commonly involve numerous agents, span multiple generations and rely on archives that are often incomplete, extremely extensive, or both.  To help to negotiate this complexity, the network will bring together scholars and institutional stakeholders from a wide range of backgrounds and disciplines to explore the ways in which different institutions mediated literature.  Through doing so, it will seek to trace collaboratively common practices and ideologies.

The network’s three workshops will each take as a theme a major way of understanding institutional practices.  The first, ‘Institutions as Curators’, will be held at the Hunterian Museum’s new premises at Kelvin Hall in Glasgow on the 31st of March and the 1st of April 2017.  This workshop will explore the changing manners in which institutions have conceived of and organised both disciplinary knowledge and physical collections.  The second, ‘Institutions as Networks’, will be held at the Society of Antiquaries in London on the 13th and 14th of July 2017.  This meeting will examine how institutions have served to connect and organise groups of people and things, considering the hierarchies that inhere in such arrangements and the points of connection between different clusters and ideals.  The final workshop, ‘Institutions as Actors’, will be held at King’s Manor, York in December 2017.  This concluding event will examine institutional identities, looking at how ideas and practices embed themselves and considering the points at which institutions themselves – as opposed to their officers and stakeholders – become perceived to be capable of performing actions.

Each workshop will feature a combination of papers from participants, roundtable discussions and more open sessions designed to facilitate the sharing of perspectives and expertise.  The funding kindly provided by the AHRC will allow us to keep the workshops free of charge for all participants and will let us provide travel and accommodation for the speakers at each event.

If you are interested in being involved with the network’s discussions, please email an expression of interest to Matthew Sangster, Jon Mee and Jenny Buckley at institutionsofliterature@gmail.com.  Please include your name, affiliation(s) (if applicable), a brief biographical statement (of around 100 words) and a short description of the institutions and topics in which you are currently most interested (around 250 words).  Please also indicate whether you would like to give a twenty-minute paper on your work at one of the workshops, or whether you would rather speak as part of a roundtable discussion or another kind of collaborative session.

The deadline for submitting expressions of interest is Monday December 19th; we’ll get back to you swiftly after this date.

 

London-Paris Romanticism Seminar Website

The new London-Paris Romanticism Seminar, jointly directed by Professor David Duff (Queen Mary) and Professor Marc Porée (École Normale Superieure/ Université Sorbonne Nouvelle), now has a website detailing the programme for the upcoming year and featuring a blog about the seminar’s activities.  The upcoming seminars are as follows:

 

Friday 11 November 2016 

Michael Gamer (University of Pennsylvania)

Re-collection’s Intranquility: Romanticism, Self-Canonization and the Business of Poetry

17.30-19.30     Senate House, Bloomsbury Room/G35 (ground floor)

 

Friday 9 December 2016       International panel: The Poetics of the Letter

Pamela Clemit (Queen Mary University of London / Wolfson College, Oxford)

Difficult to Make and Difficult to Fake: Signalling in Romantic-Period Letters

Jeremy Elprin (Université de Caen)

‘Qui me néglige me désole’: The Neglected Countenance of Keats’s Letters

17.30-19.30     Senate House, Room 243 (second floor)

 

Friday 13 January 2017

Martin Procházka (Charles University, Prague)

The Phantasmal Imagination: Biographia Literaria and Continental Philosophy

17.30-19.30     Senate House, Bedford Room/G37 (ground floor)

 

Friday 10 February 2017

Lynda Pratt (University of Nottingham)

Romanticism and the Culture of Non-Publication

17.30-19.30     Senate House, Bedford Room/G37 (ground floor)

 

Friday 10 March 2017       International panel: Literature and the Senses

Rowan Boyson (King’s College London)

A Literary History of Sensuousness: Smell, Touch and Romantic Poetry

Caroline Bertonèche (Université Grenoble Alpes)

Romantic Strains and Symptoms

17.30-19.30     Senate House, Bedford Room/G37 (ground floor)

 

Thursday 20-Friday 21 April 2017 

PARIS SYMPOSIUM      Wordsworth: The French Connection

École Normale Supérieure, rue d’Ulm – details to follow

 

Friday 12 May 2017

Gregory Dart (University College London)

The Lamb Circle and the Birth of Romantic Practical Criticism

17.30-19.30     Senate House, Bedford Room/G37 (ground floor)

Nineteenth-Century Matters Public Engagement Training Day

Please see below for details of the public engagement training day being organised at Chawton House by the inaugural BARS/BAVS Nineteenth-Century Matters Fellow, Dr Catherine Paula Han, who gives more details about the initiative here.


Nineteenth-Century Matters: Public Engagement Training Day

28 January, 2017

 

Are you a postgraduate or early career researcher working on the long nineteenth century? Are you interested in turning your research into public engagement? Want to network with likeminded individuals across humanities disciplines? If so, you will have the opportunity to learn new skills and develop ideas for future collaborations at this training day, which is hosted in the atmospheric Chawton House Library and draws together funders, academics, and heritage professionals.

The day will comprise a keynote address about funding and public engagement delivered by Mark Llewellyn, the Director of Research for the AHRC, a panel of speakers presenting case studies of successful public engagement projects, and a workshop in which participants can discuss and evolve their own ideas.

Keynote Speaker:

Mark Llewellyn (Arts and Humanities Research Council)

Panelists:

Gillian Dow (Chawton House Library and the University of Southampton)

Mary Guyatt (Jane Austen’s House Museum)

Holly Furneaux (Cardiff University and the National Army Museum)

 

This training day is sponsored by the British Association of Romantic Studies and the British Association of Victorian Studies and is an outcome of their joint Nineteenth-Century Matters fellowship. The fellowship is an initiative to support postdoctoral researchers without institutional affiliation or permanent academic employment. In recognition of such researchers’ precariousness, BARS and BAVS will pay the fees for a number of ECRs in this position to attend the day.

To register, please fill out a registration form (download here: c19matters-registration-form), and return it to Catherine Paula Han: C.Han@soton.ac.uk by 15 December, 2016.

Fee waivers are distributed on a first-come, first- served basis. Registration for all others: £35 (lunch included). Payment details are on the registration form.

Mary Shelley’s Works and their European Reception – Université de Lorraine, Nancy, Friday September 30th

Please see below for details of a workshop on the European reception of Mary Shelley taking place this Friday in Nancy.  Many thanks to Antonella Braida for bringing this to our attention.
Project : ‘Anglophone/European Identity(ies): Cross-Cultural and Cross-Border Dynamics’, (IDEA)(TELL)
Université de Lorraine, Nancy
Mary Shelley’s Works and their
European Reception II:
Workshop in Honour of Jean de Palacio

Friday 30 September 2016

Campus Lettres et Sciences Humaines, Nancy

Bâtiment A, salle A 005

Programme

14.00 Antonella Braida, Université de Lorraine. 

Introduction : Mary Shelley and interdisciplinarity today.

14.15 – 15.15 Monsieur le Professeur Jean de Palacio, La Sorbonne.
Jean de Palacio will discuss the research that he undertook on Mary Shelley and her circle. His volume Mary Shelley dans son œuvre is remarkable since it was one of the first European publications on Mary Shelley and for its in-depth use of the manuscripts that were housed by Lord Abinger. His talk will illustrate his own comparative and interdisciplinary approach, which emphasized the European inspiration and breadth of Mary Shelley’s works. 

15.15   Professor Michael Rossington, Newcastle University.

Michael Rossington, in his role as general editor of the final two volume of the Longman Shelley, will underline the importance of Jean de Palacio’s research on British Romanticism. His analysis will focus on Jean de Palacio’s contribution to European scholarship in editing Mary and Percy Bysshe Shelley’s works.

16.00 Professor Emeritus Nora Crook, Anglia Ruskin University.

Nora Crook is general editor of Mary Shelley’s works for the publisher Pickering and Chatto, and currently a general editor for Percy Bysshe Shelley’s poetry for Johns Hopkins. Her talk will focus on Jean De Palacio’s contribution to our critical understanding of Mary Shelley as, among other things, historical novelist, reviewer, poet, and life writer, and his work on attribution.

Questions and discussion on the creation of a European research network devoted to scholarship on Mary Shelley.

Organiser and contact : antonella.braida-laplace@univ-lorraine.fr

 

2015 Hazlitt Day School

Please see below for notice of this year’s Hazlitt Day School, which will take place in London on October 10th.  As usual, some excellent speakers.

William Hazlitt

The 2015 Annual Hazlitt Lecture and the 14th Hazlitt Day School will this year be dedicated to Hazlitt’s journalism, and will take place at University College London on Saturday 10 October 2015.

The Annual Lecture, entitled ‘Hazlitt’s Political Hatred’, will be given by Kevin Gilmartin of the California Institute of Technology from 4pm at the Gustave Tuck Theatre, UCL. Attendance is free of charge.

The Day School precedes the Annual Lecture from 9.30am and provides a rare opportunity for readers and scholars of Hazlitt to explore a whole range of topics relating to Hazlitt and Journalism, as well as to meet each other and exchange ideas. Ian Haywood will give the opening lecture, and shorter papers will be delivered by David Higgins, Lucasta Miller and Ruth Livesey. A small fee applies for the admission to the Day School (£20/£15) which includes morning coffee, lunch and afternoon tea.

After the Annual Lecture, the day will conclude at the Marlborough Arms, Torrington Place, in close proximity to University College, from 5.30pm. For more details, please see the attached flyer or visit www.ucl.ac.uk/hazlitt-society.