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News and Commentary from the British Association for Romantic Studies

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Call for Papers: Collage, Montage, Assemblage: Collected and Composite Forms, 1700-Present

Thanks to Freya Gowrley for sending in this exciting new Call for Papers.

 

CfP: Collage, Montage, Assemblage: Collected and Composite Forms, 1700-Present (University of Edinburgh, 18-19 April 2018)

Deadline for abstracts: 1 December 2017

 

This two-day multidisciplinary conference will explore the medium of collage across an unprecedentedly broad chronological range, considering its production and consumption over a period of more than three hundred years. While research on paper collage plays a key role in histories of modern art, particularly of the 1920s and 1930s, its longer history and diverse range of manifestations are often overlooked within art historical scholarship. Though important work is being done on collage at both the level of the individual work and the medium more broadly, this has often overlooked collage’s multitudinous forms and assorted temporal variants. This conference accordingly aims to tackle this oversight by thinking about collage across history, medium, and discipline. Employing an inclusive definition of the term, the conference invites papers discussing a variety of material, literary, and musical forms of collage, including traditional papier collé alongside practices such as writing, making music and commonplacing, and the production of composite objects such as grangerized texts, decoupage, quilts, shellwork, scrapbooks, assemblage, and photomontage.

In so doing, the conference will situate histories of modernist collage in relation to a much broader range of cultural practices, allowing for productive parallels to be drawn between the cultural productions of periods that are often subject to rigid chronological divisions. Reciprocally, the conference will encourage a consideration of collage made in the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries against key concepts and methodologies from the study of modernism and postmodernism, such as the objet trouvé or assemblage. From papier collé to the digital age, the conference will highlight collage’s rich history and crucial role in cultural production over the last three hundred years.

We invite contributions from scholars working in the fields of art history, history, music, material culture studies, and literature. We also welcome and encourage papers from practitioners working in any medium whose practice is influenced by collage, assemblage, and/or montage. Potential topics could include, but are not limited to:

 

  • Collage as medium
  • Collage, assemblage, montage: terminologies and categories
  • Defining/redefining collage
  • Making/viewing collage
  • Collage and identity
  • Collage and intention: chance, agency, intentionality
  • Collage and the modern/pre-modern/postmodern
  • Collage in art historical writing/literary criticism
  • Object biographies
  • Collage as political tool
  • Collage in space
  • Collage in the digital age
  • Collage and collaboration
  • Processes: collecting, collating, compiling, combining
  • Collage in/as music
  • Writing/reading collage
  • Collage and geography

 

Please send abstracts of no more than 300 words, and biographies of no more than 100 words, to Cole Collins and Freya Gowrley at collage.assemblage.montage@gmail.com by 1 December 2017.

The conference is supported by Edinburgh College of Art’s Dada and Surrealist Research Group with the University of Edinburgh’s Institute for Advance Studies in the Humanities.

For further information, please contact the above email address; check out our website at https://collagemontageassemblage.wordpress.com; or follow us on Twitter for updates @Collage_Conf.

Call for papers, ‘The Revolt of Islam: Texts, Subtexts, Contexts’

The call for papers is now open for an exciting conference in Rome this December, hosted by the Keats-Shelley House.

The Revolt of Islam: Texts, Subtexts, Contexts

December 15, 2017

A conference celebrating two hundred years of P. B. Shelley’s poem

This conference will mark the bicentenary of Shelley’s Revolt of Islam, first published in 1817 as Laon and Cythna. Papers are invited which will explore critical interpretations and reactions, or which provide close readings of the text itself. Papers focusing on historical and contextual considerations and which explore contemporary resonances will also be welcomed.

The afternoon of 15 December has been chosen, for it was on this day in 1817 that publisher Charles Ollier met up with Thomas Love Peacock, Mary Shelley, Claire Clairmont, and Shelley himself to discuss the potentially controversial and contentious nature of Shelley’s poem.

The conference is being organised by Giuseppe Albano, Curator of the Keats-Shelley House, and Maria Valentini from the University of Cassino, who will take over as Chair of the Keats-Shelley Memorial Association in Rome from June 2017.

Papers may be given in English or in Italian, and abstracts accepted in either language.

Deadline for submission of abstracts (c. 200 words): 31 August 2017.

Registration fee: €25.

For further information on registration, and to send your abstract, please contact:

Dr Giuseppe Albano, Curator,
Keats-Shelley House, Rome

or

Prof.ssa Maria Valentini, Dipartmento di Lettere e Filosofia,
Università di Cassino e del Lazio Meridionale

Call for Papers: Literary, Cultural, Historical and Political Celebrations across and beyond the British Isles

« Decentering Commemorations »

Literary, Cultural, Historical and Political Celebrations across and beyond the British Isles

 

Friday 20th October 2017
Campus LSH, Nancy and Musée des Beaux-Arts, Nancy 

The year 2017-2018 marks multiple anniversaries that will be commemorated transnationally: the deaths of Mme de Staël and Jane Austen, the birth of Stanley Kubrick, the release of The Beatles album “Sgt Pepper’s Lonely Hearts Club Band”, the end of World War One and the subsequent creation of new nation states, the Russian Revolution and the signing of the Maastricht Treaty. Why and how will these literary figures, cultural productions and historical events be remembered/celebrated in individual countries and across Europe? In what ways and to what extent are these commemorations transferred from one cultural space to another across and beyond the British Isles?

At a time of crisis concerning Europe’s identity and ideals, commemorations are not only intended as a nation-building process, they can also be appropriated by social or political groups. There is, indeed, a variety of actors at national, regional, and local levels, such as cultural institutions, museums, political parties and social media. The increasing mobility and instability in today’s world triggers off the opposite tendency of going back to one’s past, roots and heritage. Governments and lobbies/corporations(such as Google) use landmarks to impose their readings of literary, cultural, and political history, while grassroots and communities gather together to organize their own celebrations or to celebrate differently and sometimes more informally and spontaneously (like Halloween, Woman’s Day, National Day, Labour Day, Earth Day).

Papers discussing the following topics from a theoretical or practical perspective are welcome:

-forms and modes of commemorating
-commemoration as an expression of soft power or a means of empowerment -commemoration and technology (the choice imposed by search engines, social networks, e- media etc.)
-commemoration and cultural policies (celebrations through tourism, bilateral agreements, literary festivals etc.)
-commemoration and hyphenated/conflicting identities (bi-nationals, and “European nationals”) in the British Isles due to Devolution and Brexit
-posterity and literary canon (celebration of national and foreign authors)
-literary and visual adaptations
-publishing policies (book series, collected works, news items etc.)

Invited speakers (to be confirmed)

Prof. Joachim Frenk (Université de Sarrebruck, Allemagne)

Dr. Stefano Dominioni (Directeur de l’Institut Européen, Luxembourg)

Submission information: 

Proposals should not exceed 300 words (references excluded; 3 to 5 keywords and a short biography)
and be submitted to decenteringcommemorations-contact@univ-lorraine.fr by July, 31st 2017.

Organising Committee: 

Antonella Braida-Laplace antonella.braida-laplace@univ-lorraine.fr
Céline Sabiron celine.sabiron@univ.lorraine.fr
Roseline Théron roseline.theron@univ-lorraine.fr
Jeremy Tranmer jeremy.tranmer@univ-lorraine.fr

Sibylline Leaves: Chaos and Compilation in the Romantic Period

The full programme and registration details for ‘Sibylline Leaves: Chaos and Compilation in the Romantic Period’ (Birkbeck, London: 20 & 21 July 2017) are now available. Details can be found here.

About the conference…

‘This conference invites participants to investigate the play of papers between fugitive snips, scraps, and scattered verse, and the promise of the great work, complete edition, or philosophical system. We ask why Coleridge – poet, ‘scrapster’, and would-be encyclopaedist – turned to Virgil’s Sibyl and her scattered leaves, ‘borne aloft in liquid air’, to frame his 1817 collection of poetry Sibylline Leaves; what is at stake in reading the fragments and detached pieces which escape beyond the bound volume; how do the metaphors and materialities of these ‘leaves in flight’ interact; what mediates the ‘phantasmal chaos of association’; how does compilation inform the practices, ideals, anxieties and temporalities of romantic authorship, and the cut-and-paste fervours of its readership? Please join us to discuss all this and more over two days, in the summery environs of Bloomsbury.’

Call for Papers: Dream and Literary Creation in Women’s Writings in the 18th and 19th Centuries

 

Please see below for details of a conference to be held at the Université Clermont-Auvergne in France next year. 

 

Call for papers

International Conference, Clermont-Ferrand, 5-7 April 2018

Université Clermont-Auvergne – CELIS

 

« ‘with shut eyes, but acute mental vision’: Dream and Literary Creation in Women’s Writings in the 18th and 19th Centuries »

 

 

In June 1816, in a house on the shores of Lake Geneva, a young girl of barely 19 had a dream which would turn out to be the source of one of the greatest contemporary myths of modern times. This pivotal dream has remained prominent thanks to the preface that Mary Shelley wrote for the 1831 edition of Frankenstein, in which she describes a vivid, integrally visionary experience: “I saw – with shut eyes, but acute mental vision, – I saw the pale student of unhallowed arts kneeling beside the thing he had put together […].” In a lesser-known dream, a year earlier, Shelley brings her premature, unnamed first-born back to life: “Dreamt that my little baby came to life again; that it had only been cold, and that we rubbed it before the fire, and it lived. Awake and find no baby” (19th March 1815).

Dreams in Frankenstein are at the heart of the writing process but they also constitute the diegetic substance of the narrative. Victor’s nightmare, which follows the opening of the Creature’s “dull yellow eye” (Volume I, chapter 4), is difficult to overlook in any critical consideration of the importance of dreams in the novel. To mark the bicentenary of Frankenstein’s publication in 1818, this conference will re-examine the previously-recognised oneiric facets of the novel and develop fresh perspectives on dreams and dreaming in Mary Shelley’s fiction. Proposals with a special focus on those three dreams, as well as on other works by Mary Shelley in which dreams are often premonitory (Valperga, Matilda, “The Dream” for example), are particularly welcome. Discussion may also extend to analyses of day-dreaming which Mary Shelley also refers to in her preface when she distinguishes between her youthful fancies, “all [her] own”, and her fiction, destined to be read by others.

In addition, the oneiric character of Frankenstein is particularly relevant in any reappraisal of the textuality of dreams and their link to women’s creativity and creation as a whole. Accounts of real dreams in diaries and letters may interrogate the paradox of the invasion of Self by a radically Other force (“My imagination, unbidden, possessed and guided me”, wrote Mary Shelley), when the passive dreamer turns into a waking creative subject. Ontological alterity may be considered as being located at the core of such processes. Is there a specifically female understanding or expression of this encounter with the Other within? Literary dreams, whose putative oneiric nature needs further clarification, oscillate between narrative dexterity and the expression of possibly subconscious scenarios. How significant is a character’s dream? Is it radically inconsistent and heterogeneous? We therefore also invite papers on these, and other, connections between dream and fiction in novels written by Shelley and other female novelists.

Thus, the central issue of authorial intention in novels (or in poetry or plays if relevant), published from the end of the 17th century to the late 19th century, is the line of enquiry which this conference hopes to pursue. How is Mary Shelley’s creative outlook and experience mirrored in the writing of her contemporaries’ (Frances Burney’s or Ann Radcliffe’s for example), or in that of female authors who came before or after her (Jane Barker and the Brontë sisters for example)? Approaches developed by Margaret Anne Doody (“Deserts, Ruins and Troubled Waters: Female Dreams in Fiction and the Development of the Gothic Novel”, 1977), Ronald Thomas (Dreams of Authority, 1990, on the Gothic and nineteenth-century novels) or Julia Epstein on Burney (The Iron Pen, 1989) may be particularly pertinent here.

 

Papers may be given in English (preferably) or in French.

Please send your proposals to Isabelle Hervouet-Farrar and Anne Rouhette at dreamconference2018@gmail.com before 30th September 2017.

 

Scientific committee:

Caroline Bertonèche, Université de Grenoble

Lilla Maria Crisafulli, University of Bologna

Isabelle Hervouet-Farrar, Université Clermont-Auvergne

Anne Rouhette, Université Clermont-Auvergne

Victor Sage, University of East Anglia

Jean Viviès, Université d’Aix-Marseille

 

Call for Papers: The 46th Wordsworth Summer Conference, 2017

The Call for Papers for the next Wordsworth Summer Conference has now been released. See below for further details, and follow the links for details on how to apply for a bursary/submit an abstract.

The 46th Wordsworth Summer Conference, 2017
Monday 7 August to Thursday 17 August at Rydal Hall, Cumbria

Keynote Lectures, 2017:
Gillian Beer   Matthew Bevis   James Engell
Richard Gravil   Meiko O’Halloran   Nick Halmi
Alexandra Harris  Felicity James
Michael O’Neill
Fiona Robertson   Fiona Stafford
Heidi Thomson   Kasahara Yorimichi

http://www.wordsworthconferences.org.uk/3.html

and the link to our bursaries for postgraduate students

http://www.wordsworthconferences.org.uk/10.html

Key Features:

    • The conference is in two parts, of five nights each, with a changeover day
    • 7 excursions, 7 fell-walks, and some lower level walks
    • 13 keynote lectures and 30-34 papers
    • Either 4 or 9 full days in Rydal 
    • Excursions to places of Wordsworthian connections or general cultural interest 
    • Up to seventy miles of fell walking

Call for Papers. William Godwin: Forms, Fears, Futures. 24 June 2017

Please see the CfP below for the conference ‘William Godwin: Forms, Fears, Futures’ to be held at Newcastle University on 24 June 2o17. The deadline for abstracts is 15 March 2017.

 

William Godwin: Forms, Fears, Futures

24 June 2017

Newcastle University

Confirmed plenary speakers: Professor Mark Philp (Warwick) and Dr David O’Shaughnessy (Trinity College Dublin)

Registration fee: £20 (waived for Newcastle staff and students)

Postgraduate bursaries available

Abstracts are invited for a one-day conference and debate on the work of William Godwin, to be hosted by Newcastle University on 24 June 2017.

We aim to foster a spirit of lively discussion and structured debate and to explore the full range of Godwin’s thought, writing, and influence. Abstracts are sought for twenty-minute papers which respond to one of the three panels: Forms, Fears, and Futures.

William Godwin is perhaps today best-known for his 1793 political treatise Enquiry Concerning Political Justice and its Influence on Morals and Happiness, and for the novel which explored the ideas developed in Political Justice, Things as They Are; or, The Adventures of Caleb Williams (1794). As a Romantic-period author and figure, however, he is often subsumed within his family circle and the drama of their overlapped personal lives and works.

This event aims instead to place Godwin and his works squarely centre-stage. While we acknowledge the value of reading Godwin as part of a kin- and friendship coterie that included Mary Wollstonecraft, Mary Wollstonecraft Shelley, Percy Bysshe Shelley, Lord Byron and Thomas Peacock among others, we are interested in what happens when we consider Godwin first and foremost as an author and thinker in his own right. What new perspectives and readings are afforded us? What texts and approaches have been overlooked – or overstudied? What is Godwin’s legacy, and where next for Godwin studies?

The day will be structured as three themed panels, followed by a roundtable led by Professor Matthew Grenby (Newcastle) on the topic ‘the future of Godwin studies’. Each panel will be opened by a plenary address on the panel topic, followed by up to three papers.

We ask that abstracts respond to one of the three panels. Topics might include, but are by no means limited to:

Forms

  • Formal experimentation in Godwin’s works
  • Godwin and genre
  • Godwin’s other forms: biography, history, the essay, children’s literature, or drama
  • Familial, social, or national forms

Fears

  • Godwin and the Revolutionary decade
  • Godwin’s political thought
  • Domestic, economic, social, or national fears

Futures

  • Godwin’s speculative thought
  • Godwin ‘after’ Romanticism
  • Godwin’s reception history
  • Godwin and the idea of the future; Godwin’s utopias/dystopias
  • Godwin and time

Abstracts for twenty-minute papers should be no more than 250 words, should include your name and institutional affiliation and position (if relevant), and should clearly state which panel you wish to be considered for. Please send abstracts to williamgodwinfearsformsfutures@gmail.com by 15 March 2017.

We have a limited number of postgraduate travel bursaries of £50 available. Bursaries will be offered on the basis of financial requirements; should you wish to be considered for one, please include alongside your abstract a statement of no more than 100 words explaining why you would benefit.

The conference is intended to act as a springboard for an edited collection of essays, to which speakers will be invited to contribute following the event. We are currently in discussion with Palgrave Macmillan.

Conference organisers

Eliza O’Brien (Newcastle), Helen Stark (Queen Mary), and Beatrice Turner (Roehampton)

Call for Papers. John Thelwall: Radical Networks and Cultures of Reform 1780-1820

CfP for the Second International Conference of the John Thelwall Society which will be held in Derby in July 2017 (deadline 31 January).

Call for Papers:

John Thelwall: Radical Networks and Cultures of Reform 1780-1820

July 21-23, 2017

For its second international conference, the John Thelwall Society, in collaboration with the University of Derby, invites papers on Thelwall within interlinked regional networks of activism, sociability, dissent and reform in Britain 1780-1820.

Recent years have seen increased interest among scholars and local historians in the“conversable worlds” (Mee) of the Midlands Enlightenment and its groundbreaking intersections of politics and poetry, religion and science, doctors and dissenters, pedagogues and visionaries. As a radical polymath and itinerant lecturer, John Thelwall moved between and spoke to all of them, not only in the Midlands.  From Devon to Wales, Norfolk to Scotland, Ireland to France, Roman history to elocution, he planted the liberty tree by other names, giving voice to hope and binding together scattered communities of reform. At a time of war and repression, in the face of nationalist dogma, Thelwall championed egalitarian connections and transnational solidarities that continue to offer a way forward in our own dark times (Poole).

Representative of these regional intellectual centres, Derby, the conference location, lies at the heart of the Derwent Valley World Heritage Site, a cradle of the Industrial Revolution. The home of visionary scientists and artists, revolutionary inventors and industrialists, outspoken Philosophical and Political Societies, and the Pentrich rebellion (whose 200th anniversary the conference also commemorates), it also hosts the Derby Manuscript, the trove of Thelwall poetry whose discovery draws attention to his importance in radical networks, and theirs to an understanding of his career.The conference will celebrate this discovery through a special exhibition of the manuscript. Other highlights include excursions to sites related to the industrial revolution, Thelwall and notable residents of Derby (including Erasmus Darwin and Joseph Wright), and a radical pub night with songs and toasts in the very room where the Derby Political Society delivered its notorious 1792 Revolution Address. And of course, there will be a lively two-day program of talks, panels and keynote lectures.

The JTS invites proposals for papers or sessions on any aspects of, or relationships between, Thelwall, other radical figures like Paine, and/or reform networks in Derby or elsewhere in Britain. Contributions are welcome from all disciplines and need not focus expressly on Thelwall. Topics might include (but are not limited to):

  • Erasmus Darwin and the Derby Philosophers
  • the Derby MS and/or the relationship of poetry, politics and performance
  • the role of women in radical (and/or scientific, philosophical, artistic) networks
  • the relationship of religious and political dissent
  • Joseph Wright and/or the role of the arts in philosophic/scientific/radical circles
  • The Pentrich Rising
  • Paine and/in Derby
  • Thelwall’s lectures: politics, history, elocution
  • radicalism and reform: continuities and/or schisms 1780-1820
  • Toryism, loyalism, reaction
  • education and the dissenting academies

Please send proposals of no more than 300words to K.Hindmarch@derby.ac.uk no later than 31stJanuary 2017.

CFP: The Shelley Conference, Friday 15th September 2017, London

Please see below (and the website) for a Call for Papers for a conference on the work on Percy Bysshe Shelley and Mary Shelley, to be held in London next year.

 

CFP: The Shelley Conference 2017

Date: Friday 15th September 2017 (9.30am to 5pm, to be followed by a wine reception)

Location: Institute for English Studies, London

Keynote speakers: Prof. Nora Crook (Anglia Ruskin University), Prof. Michael O’Neill (Durham University)

A presentation will also be given by the editors of The Longman Shelley (Kelvin Everest, Michael Rossington, Jack Donovan and Will Bowers) on progress towards completion of the edition, and future plans.

* * *

This one-day conference, held at the Institute for English Studies in central London, and supported by the Centre for Eighteenth Century Studies, University of York, celebrates the writings of two major authors from the Romantic Period: Percy Bysshe Shelley (PBS) and Mary Wollstonecraft Shelley (MWS).

A continuing scholarly fascination with all things ‘Shelley’ is due in part to the unprecedented access we now have to their texts (in annotated scholarly editions) and manuscripts (presented in facsimile and transcript). The Shelleys’ works are more readily available than ever before. Michael Rossington, when discussing the task of editing PBS, emphasises the complexity of the poet’s afterlife, especially in comparison to other Romantic authors:

It will have taken nearly 200 years from his death for complete scholarly editions of his oeuvre to emerge. The absence of such fundamental resources has been, and remains, to student and non-specialist alike, a cause of puzzlement, if not consternation, especially since complete works of other Romantic poets are available in more than one modern scholarly edition.[1]

Similarly, the lack of an annual or even frequent conference dedicated to PBS (comparable to those that exist for other Romantic writers) has prompted the decision to organise this event for 2017. Excitingly it is now, in the first part of the 21st century, that the most detailed comprehensive editions of PBS’s works are in production (The Complete Poetry of Percy Bysshe Shelley ed. Donald Reiman, Neil Fraistat and Nora Crook is already well advanced, with Vol VII published soon, and The Poems of Shelley ed. Kelvin Everest, G. M. Matthews, Michael Rossington and Jack Donovan is nearing completion).[2]

Previous conferences at Gregynog in 1978, 1980, and 1992 and the Percy Shelley Bicentennial Conference in New York in 1992 have provided a wonderful legacy for future Shelleyan academics, and it is in the spirit of these events that we will present The Shelley Conference 2017. We include MWS in this new conference, as she also does not have her own regular academic event. However, the recent conference ‘Beyond Frankenstein’s Shadow’ (Nancy, France, 2016) focused specifically on MWS, and the emphasis placed on her work at the ‘Summer of 1816’ conference (Sheffield, 2016) indicated that her role on the main stage of Romanticism is increasingly appreciated.

It is for these reasons that the ‘Shelley’ of the conference title is left ambiguous. The Shelleys are increasingly seen as a collaborative literary partnership, and modern criticism reinforces the importance of reading their works in parallel. The nuances of this, however, are far from simple, and this statement does not imply there is anything like a sense of either consistent ‘unity’ or ‘conflict’ when considering the Shelleys’ literary relationship. This is the kind of issue which will be explored at The Shelley Conference 2017.

The conference organisers request abstracts of 200 words for 20-minute papers, sent to theshelleyconference@gmail.com before 1st April 2017. Papers can be on any aspect of the work of PBS or MWS (or both). The conference particularly welcomes papers that consider the task of editing Shelley, and/or examination of the manuscripts of PBS and MWS. Other topics can include, but are not limited to:

  • Works by PBS or MWS written or published in 1817 (e.g. the jointly authored History of a Six Weeks’ Tour including ‘Mont Blanc’)
  • Shelleyan philosophy
  • PBS’s lyrics/lyric art
  • MWS’s posthumous editing of PBS
  • PBS’s prose works
  • MWS’s novels after Frankenstein
  • The 1816 Geneva Summer
  • The Shelleys & place (Italy, London…)
  • The Shelleys’ influences
  • The critical history of the Shelleys
  • The Shelleys’ translations
  • The Shelleys and genre
  • The collaboration of PBS and MWS
  • Literary communities: Shelley and his circle

 

Event Organisers:

Anna Mercer (PhD candidate, University of York), anna.mercer@york.ac.uk
Harrie Neal (PhD candidate, University of York), hn553@york.ac.uk

Advisory Board: 

Prof. Kelvin Everest (University of Liverpool)
Prof. Michael Rossington (Newcastle University)

 

References:

[1] Michael Rossington, ‘Editing Shelley’ in The Oxford Handbook to Percy Bysshe Shelley ed. Michael O’Neill, Anthony Howe and Madeleine Callaghan (Oxford: OUP, 2013) p. 645.

[2] The Complete Poetry of Percy Bysshe Shelley ed. Donald Reiman, Neil Fraistat and Nora Crook (Baltimore: Johns Hopkins UP. 3 vols to date. 2000, 2004, 2012) and The Poems of Shelley ed. Kelvin Everest, G. M. Matthews, Michael Rossington and Jack Donovan (London: Longman. 4 vols to date. 1989, 2000, 2011, 2013).

CfP: Sanditon: 200 Years

Please see below for a Call for Papers from Anne Toner for a conference to celebrate the bicentenary of Jane Austen’s Sanditon.


‘Sanditon: 200 Years’ is a conference that will take place at Trinity College, Cambridge from March 29-31, 2017. The conference will mark the bicentenary of the composition of Jane Austen’s unfinished novel, Sanditon, in a year that also marks the bicentenary of Austen’s death. Austen began to write Sanditon in January of 1817. The manuscript closes with the date of March 18. Austen died four months later.

The manuscript of Sanditon is held at King’s College, Cambridge and will be available for participants in the conference to view, along with items from the Dorothy Warren and David Gilson Jane Austen collections, also held at at King’s. To coincide with the conference, Austen exhibitions will take place at the University Library, Cambridge and the English Faculty, Cambridge University.

Proposals for twenty-minute papers on any topic relating to Sanditon are invited. The conference warmly encourages a diverse range of approaches to the work, including papers that are thematic, stylistic, biographical, socio-historical, or in any way more broadly contextual or comparative in their focus. The manuscript of Sanditon will be a subject of particular interest and we welcome papers that address subjects relating to Austen’s composition practices; revisions; the material text; manuscript culture; the fragment; posthumous publication. Papers addressing the reception and later textual history of Sanditon—its editions, completions, and adaptations —are also very welcome.

Confirmed speakers:

  • Linda Bree (Cambridge University Press)
  • Emma Clery (University of Southampton)
  • Claudia L. Johnson (Princeton University)
  • Michelle Levy (Simon Fraser University)
  • Peter Sabor (McGill University)
  • Kathryn Sutherland (University of Oxford)
  • Clara Tuite (University of Melbourne)

Please send proposals of about 300 words to: sanditon200years@gmail.com by Friday November 11, 2016.

For further details, see the conference website: https://sanditon200years.wordpress.com.

Conference organizer: Dr Anne Toner (Trinity College, Cambridge)