BARS Exchange

BARS Exchange

Aggregated blogs on Romantic Studies – please click through to read full posts.

Stephen Copley Research Report: Hannah Moss at Chawton House Library

By Anna Mercer

Hannah Moss (PhD Candidate, University of Sheffield) reports on her research at Chawton House Library. Her trip was funded by a BARS Stephen Copley Research Award.

Stephen Copley Research Report: Hannah Moss

Chawton House in Hampshire hardly needs an introduction as it is so frequently spoken of with such great fondness by everyone who has been lucky enough to spend some time working in the Library Reading Room. Just a few minutes’ walk down the leafy lane from the cottage where Jane Austen lived and worked between 1809-17 stands the ‘Great House’ inherited by her brother Edward after being adopted by the Knight family. Chawton House Library now makes an idyllic and inspiring setting for a collection of early women’s writing, and thanks to a Stephen Copley Award, I have been able to spend a productive week conducting research towards my thesis here.

My PhD thesis seeks to reappraise the representation of female artists in women’s writing of the period 1760-1820. With a wide-ranging artistic education considered a prerequisite for being accepted as an accomplished female, novels of the period tend to be populated by women who are adept at everything from painting portraits to playing the pianoforte. However, the …read more

Source:: http://www.bars.ac.uk/blog/?p=2130

Call for Contributions: “Printing Things: Blocks, Plates and Stones 1400-1900”

By dustinfrazierwood

CALL FOR CONTRIBUTIONS
Title: Printing Things: Blocks, Plates, and Stones 1400-1900

Editors: Giles Bergel (Oxford), Elizabeth Savage (Institute of English Studies)
Advisory board: Sven Dupré (Utrecht), Caroline Duroselle-Melish (Folger), Maria Goldoni (‘Xilografie modenesi’), Paul Nash (Printing Historical Society), Marco Mozzo (Polo museale della Toscana)

Deadline: 15 October 2018 via https://goo.gl/forms/eHAzaQUFklyMOmYv2
Queries: Gemma Cornetti at printingcolourproject@gmail.com

In all fields based on historical printed material, research conventionally focuses on the text, images, and other information that was printed. The objects used to produce that information (including cut woodblocks, engraved metal plates, and cast metal sorts) have been neglected. Many hundreds of thousands of these historical printing surfaces survive today. The vast majority are inaccessible to researchers because they are uncatalogued and often considered ‘uncatalogue-able’. However, as individual objects and as an untapped category of cultural heritage, these artefacts of printing offer a great deal of information that the finished prints, books, fabrics, and other printed materials do not.

As relics of historical crafts and industry, these objects fall outside the modern disciplines. This edited volume will respond to the need for a multidisciplinary introduction to what image-based fields calls ‘print matrices’ and text-based fields call ‘printing surfaces’. Following from the conference Blocks Plates Stones (London, 2017), …read more

Source:: https://romanticillustrationnetwork.wordpress.com/2018/07/18/call-for-contributions-printing-things-blocks-plates-and-stones-1400-1900/

On This Day in 1818: 17 July, Percy Bysshe Shelley translates Plato’s Symposium

By Anna Mercer

We continue to celebrate the 200th anniversary of literary and historical events in the Romantic period with the BARS ‘On This Day’ blog series. Following a post by Alan Weinberg in March on Shelley’s arrival in Italy in 1818, we now present this commentary by Amanda Blake Davis on the poet’s translation of the Symposium, a task that he undertook during his stay in Bagni di Lucca, Tuscany.

On This Day in 1818: 17 July, Percy Bysshe Shelley translates Plato’s Symposium

By Amanda Blake Davis (University of Sheffield)

This summer marks the bicentenary of Percy Bysshe Shelley’s translation of Plato’s Symposium into English, an exercise of remarkable speed that was conducted over ten days in the summer of 1818. For James A. Notopoulos, ‘[t]he translation of the Symposium was one of the most important things in Shelley’s poetic life. It is valuable not only in itself but also for its influence on Shelley’s subsequent poetry’.[1] In light of this comment, I would like to briefly consider the history of the translation’s composition and its impact upon Shelley’s poetic thought.

‘The Symposium’, Pietro Testa (1648)

Shelley began translating the Symposium on the 7th of July and continued on a …read more

Source:: http://www.bars.ac.uk/blog/?p=2122

ヒゲ脱毛により黒さが目立つ理由

By Robjohn

ヒゲ脱毛は、完了してしまえば良い事ばかりであるのにも関わらず、多くの方々が躊躇してしまいます。

その原因が、黒さが増すということです。レーザーを照射した後、数日経過すると肌の赤みが徐々に収まります。しかし、髭の黒さが増して目立つようになります。施術ミスなどではなく、誰もが起こり得ることですが、目立つので気になる方が多いのです。

ミスではないので、時間の経過と共に収まっていきますが、数日から1週間ほど続いてしまうことがあります。しかも、ヒゲ脱毛により黒くなってしまった毛というのは、本来の髭よりも柔らかくコシがないため、通常通り電気シェーバーやカミソリを使用しても上手に処理することができないのです。

処理するほど肌が荒れてしまうので、逆効果になってしまいます。ヒゲ脱毛を受ける決断をした方というのは、コンプレックスの濃いヒゲを薄くするために施術を受けるのにも関わらず、高額な費用をかけてより一層目立つようになると損をした気持ちになります。

しかも、痛みも我慢しなければならないので、欠点の方が多く感じてしまう方が居るのも仕方ありません。即効性の高い解決方法があれば良いのですが、現時点でヒゲ脱毛後の黒さを改善する方法は確立されていません。

自分で抜いたりすると、途中で切れてしまい埋没毛を誘発するので、自然に抜けるまで待機するのが最善です。また、指でヒゲを触るというのも、雑菌の影響で可能する恐れがあります。

リンクス(RINX)についてならこちら

…read more

Source:: http://bars2015.org/2018/07/12/%E3%83%92%E3%82%B2%E8%84%B1%E6%AF%9B%E3%81%AB%E3%82%88%E3%82%8A%E9%BB%92%E3%81%95%E3%81%8C%E7%9B%AE%E7%AB%8B%E3%81%A4%E7%90%86%E7%94%B1/