BARS Exchange

BARS Exchange

Aggregated blogs on Romantic Studies – please click through to read full posts.

Stephen Copley Research Report: Katie Snow at the Gillray Collection

By Anna Mercer

For more information on how to apply for a BARS Stephen Copley Research Award, visit the BARS website.

Stephen Copley Research Report by Katie Snow

House of Lords Library: The Gillray Collection

This May, I visited the Parliamentary Archives in Westminster, London. Thanks to the generous support of BARS, I was able to undertake some key research for my PhD thesis, which explores representations of the breast in eighteenth-century visual satire. As a massive satirical print enthusiast, I’ve had my eye on the House of Lords Gillray collection for a while. Bequeathed to the library in 1899, this beautiful compilation of caricatures belonged to Sir William Augustus Fraser (1826-1898). Excitingly, some of the prints within the eleven volumes do not appear in the British Museum’s catalogue of prints and drawings – the go-to source for scholars of visual satire. The House of Lords Gillray collection is precious, and I’m grateful to the library for granting me access.

The intention of my PhD project is to progress understanding of the way in which ideological narratives of femininity, and especially motherhood, were (and still are), forged around the breast. Previous scholarship has overlooked the significance of the breast within visual satire, and …read more

Source:: http://www.bars.ac.uk/blog/?p=2372

2019 BARS First Book Prize Shortlist Announced

By Matthew Sangster

The judges for the 2019 BARS First Book prize, chaired by Professor Claire Connolly, are delighted to announce a shortlist of four exceptional books:

Congratulations to all the shortlisted authors!

The winner of the prize will be announced at BARS’ 16th International Conference, ‘Romantic Facts and Fantasies’, at the University of Nottingham in late July.

…read more

Source:: http://www.bars.ac.uk/blog/?p=2368

RIN Summer Event: Book Launch, July 23rd, 6pm Westminster Archives Centre

By marylshannon

9781108425711

The RIN book, Romanticism and Illustration ed. Haywood, Matthews and Shannon is out!

Thank you to our wonderful contributors, and to CUP for producing such an elegant tome.

To celebrate, we are inviting everyone to the Book Launch: this will take place at the Wine Reception at the end of the inaugural event of the GWM Reynolds Society. Please come along and have a drink with us to celebrate both the launch of Romanticism and Illustration, and the launch of this new literary society!

Date: Tuesday July 23rd, 2019

Time: 6pm onwards

Location: City of Westminster Archives Centre, 10 St. Anne’s Street, London

Poster with full details below:

reynolds-society-launch-poster-with-rin-launch-info.jpg

…read more

Source:: https://romanticillustrationnetwork.com/2019/05/15/rin-summer-event-book-launch-july-23rd-6pm-westminster-archives-centre/

‘Romantic Facts and Fantasies: Culture and Heritage of the Romantic Age, c. 1780-1840’ Exhibition Opening

By Anna Mercer

‘Romantic Facts and Fantasies: Culture and Heritage of the Romantic Age, c. 1780-1840′ Exhibition Opening

by Amy Wilcockson

After months of hard work and sifting through the plentiful archives of Manuscripts and Special Collections at the University of Nottingham, Thursday 9 May 2019 saw the private view and official opening of the ‘Romantic Facts and Fantasies: Culture and Heritage of the Romantic Age, c. 1780-1840′ exhibition.

All image credits to Manuscripts and Special Collections, University of Nottingham

The exhibition centres on key themes including science, travel, industry, communication and exploration in the Romantic period, alongside focusing on a number of authors, poets and key figures irrevocably linked with the East Midlands.

As part of the team co-curating this exhibition, it was astounding to see all the pieces of the jigsaw, so to speak, put together. From October 2018, the exhibition has been conceptualised, items chosen for inclusion, and then board texts, case backs and captions written, and then of course, loan items sourced from a variety of locations including Newstead Abbey and Derby Museums. To see it all in one place, and open to the public was an amazing feeling. The private view invited members of the BARS Executive …read more

Source:: http://www.bars.ac.uk/blog/?p=2361

Romanticism at The Royal Institution: 7 June 2019

By Anna Mercer

For those in or near London this summer…

Join fellow Romantic enthusiasts at The Royal Institution on 7th June for a FREE half-day symposium in association with the London-Paris Romanticism Seminar and the Fordham Romanticism Group, New York. Listen to talks by leading scholars who will restore the forgotten literary history of the Royal Institution and highlight its unique interdisciplinary contribution to British Romantic culture.

The event will conclude with a wine reception to celebrate the launch of Sarah Zimmerman’s new book The Romantic Literary Lecture in Britain (Oxford University Press).

Book here.

…read more

Source:: http://www.bars.ac.uk/blog/?p=2355

London-Paris Romanticism Seminar: Daniel O’Quinn, Friday 17 May 2019, Senate House, University of London

By LPRS

oquinn advert

The next meeting of the London-Paris Romanticism Seminar will take place on Friday 17 May in the Bloomsbury Room (G35, ground floor) at Senate House, University of London, starting at 5.30. As our distinguished guest speaker, we are delighted to welcome Professor Daniel O’Quinn of the University of Guelph, who will present a paper entitled Whither Shakespeare?: Reynolds, Siddons, and the Post-American Repertoire. This will be followed by a discussion and wine reception. The event is free and open to everyone, including postgraduates and members of the public. No booking is required.

Daniel O’Quinn is a Professor in the School of English and Theatre Studies at the University of Guelph, Canada. adjustedHe is the author of Engaging the Ottoman Empire: Vexed Mediations, 1690-1815 (2018); Entertaining Crisis in the Atlantic Imperium, 1770-1790 (2011); and Staging Governance: Theatrical Imperialism in London, 1770-1800 (2005). He is also the co-editor with Jane Moody of The Cambridge Companion to British Theatre, 1730-1830 (2007). Other publications include a collection of essays entitled Georgian Theatre in an Information Age, co-edited with Gillian Russell, which appeared as …read more

Source:: http://londonparisromantic.com/?p=1066

Call for Papers: Teaching (the) Romantic / Romantic Teaching

By Anna Mercer

Romantic Circles Pedagogy Commons seeks essays that address a wide range of topics, methods and themes related to the teaching of Romanticism. For the past several years we have published special volumes that speak to a specific issue within Romanticist pedagogy, such as ‘Romanticism and Technology’, ‘Teaching Global Romanticism’, or ‘Teaching the Romantic with the Contemporary’. For this volume we’d like to issue more broad and open call for essays that offer innovative approaches to teaching Romanticism. We are especially keen on approaches that consider Romanticism as methodology or practice and seek to reproduce it in the classroom.

‘Wanderer above the Sea of Fog’, Caspar David Friedrich (c.1818)

Possible topics include but should be in no way limited to:

Teaching specific Romantic-period authors through an engagement with their poetics or aesthetic practices

  • Teaching Romantic-era pedagogy, for example, Rousseau or the Edgeworths
  • Teaching Romanticism in the 21st-century classroom
  • Teaching Romanticism collaboratively
  • Teaching Romanticism as an act of resistance

Please submit 300-word abstracts to ruderman.4@osu.edu by June 30. If accepted, completed drafts would be due by September 30.

The Romantic Circles Pedagogy Commons is a peer-reviewed online journal dedicated to the presentation of essays about teaching that offer sample teaching materials as well, from printable handouts to ‘digital-born’ …read more

Source:: http://www.bars.ac.uk/blog/?p=2347

Call for Papers: ‘The Lady’s Magazine at 250’ a two-day event at the University of Kent (April 2020)

By ladys-magazine

Keynote Speakers: Prof Manushag N. Powell (Purdue University) and Dr Chloe Wigston Smith (University of York)

This two-day event will commemorate the 250th anniversary of the founding of the Lady’s Magazine (1770-1832). Part symposium, part study day and part public celebration of the first recognisably women’s magazine, this event will reflect and explore the diverse content, broad readership and multiple legacies of this influential periodical.

The first day will have a full programme of talks on and celebrations of the magazine. The second day will include a study day on fashion, embroidery, material culture and the Lady’s Magazine including optional embroidery workshops, which will allow participants to get hands on with history by learning to embroider a motif from a Lady’s Magazine pattern under the expert tutelage of historical embroidery expert, Alison E. Larkin. Further celebrations and specialist panels will be announced in due course.

Proposals are invited for talks on all aspects of the Lady’s Magazine, its origins, legacies or place in eighteenth-century and Romantic print and periodical culture. Please send abstracts of 250-300 words to Jennie Batchelor (j.e.batchelor@kent.ac.uk) on or before 1 June 2019.

…read more

Source:: https://blogs.kent.ac.uk/ladys-magazine/2019/04/27/call-for-papers-the-ladys-magazine-at-250-a-two-day-event-at-the-university-of-kent-april-2020/

Stephen Copley Research Report: Eleanor Bryan on Vampires

By Anna Mercer

With thanks to Eleanor Bryan for this report. Want to apply for an award? Information can be found here.

The Stephen Copley Research Award allowed me to spend four days in London attending a conference and conducting archival research at the British Library. The Open Graves Open Minds (OGOM) conference was held at Keats House in Hampstead and was entitled ‘“Some Curious Disquiet”: Polidori, the Byronic vampire, and its Progeny’. The event was prompted by the bicentenary of The Vampyre and featured papers on topics ranging from contemporary adaptations to the vampire’s folkloric and Byronic roots.

My PhD thesis concerns dramatic adaptations of Gothic novels, namely Mary Shelley’s Frankenstein(1818) and Bram Stoker’s Dracula(1897): two iconic texts which are frequently paired together in adaptations. The repeated coupling of two narratives with such vastly disparate publication dates is intriguing, as the texts deal with very different cultural contexts and social concerns. My thesis attributes this in part to Lord Byron’s ghost story competition at the Villa Diodati in 1816, the ‘year without a summer’, from which both Frankenstein’s monster and the first literary vampire originate. Attending the OGOM Polidori conference allowed me to learn more about the literary history of …read more

Source:: http://www.bars.ac.uk/blog/?p=2344