BARS Exchange

BARS Exchange

Aggregated blogs on Romantic Studies – please click through to read full posts.

The editions of the Romantics: That which connects

By Lynn Shepherd

Keat's Poems

by Ellen O’Neill

“It has been estimated that at the time of Keats’ death, the combined sales of the three books published during his lifetime amounted to 200 copies.”

Andrew Motion, The Guardian, 23 January 2010

Yet here we are, two hundred years later, and the Keats-Shelley Memorial Association is running an international prize for essay and poetry celebrating the publication of the first volume.

How does a life that ended at 25 wield such power?

This year’s Keats-Shelley theme is ‘To a Friend’ and the idea of Keats’s own relationships. It stirred in me enormous emotions about my own relationship to John Keats– through the editions of his poems that brought him into my life. Like great choral music, if no one picks up the actual books and reads (or sings), the genius is silent.

First stirrings
In junior high school, just starting to be conscious of the names Keats, Shelley, Byron, Wordsworth, Coleridge, I noticed books that had long been on the family bookshelf: The Literature of England: An Anthology & A History, Vol. 1 & 2, Wood, Wyatt, Anderson, Scott, Foresman and Company, 1947; and Seven Centuries of Verse: English & American, A.J.M Smith, Michigan State College, Charles …read more

Source:: https://wordsworth.org.uk/blog/2017/06/20/the-editions-of-the-romantics-that-which-connects/

Keats-Shelley Association of America Postcard Caption Contest

By Matthew Sangster

m-shelley-1

(Please see below for an announcement of a Romantics-focussed caption competition being run by the Keats-Shelley Association of America.)

What would Mary Shelley quip about Romanticism, scholarship, or the current state of the world? Now is your chance to riff in the Keats-Shelley Association’s caption contest for its new series of informational postcards. Please help us create the picture caption for our first postcard, featuring Mary Shelley, which will be distributed at various conferences and Romantics 200 events. In addition to bragging rights, the winner will receive “captioned by” credit on the back of that K-SAA postcard. With John Keats, Percy Bysshe Shelley, and others to be featured on cards to come, there will be several opportunities for you to participate.

Don’t be the last person to submit your caption! Entries limited to 140 characters. Send to our Twitter (@KSAAcomm), Facebook (Keats-Shelley Association of America), or email (info@K-SAA.org) by June 26th. All are welcome to submit and encouraged to disseminate widely.

…read more

Source:: http://www.bars.ac.uk/blog/?p=1662

Archive Spotlight, ‘Finding a wife for the Reverend William Ettrick’

By Anna Mercer

Dorset History Centre

The Archive Spotlight series continues with a post by Elizabeth Spencer (PhD Candidate, History, University of York), on her findings after a research visit to Dorset History Centre in Dorchester. The papers of the Reverend William Ettrick (1757-1847), although not appropriate material for Elizabeth’s thesis, did however tell a rather intriguing tale, which she recounts here.

Would you like to contribute to this series? For more information, please contact Anna Mercer.

“The Lady was to be young and of good Family also”: Finding a wife for the Reverend William Ettrick

By Elizabeth Spencer

Recent research into the Ettrick family of High Barnes in Sunderland led me, somewhat surprisingly, all the way to the Dorset History Centre in Dorchester in order to look at the papers of the Reverend William Ettrick (1757-1847).[1] I have been researching the marriage of his parents William (1726-1808) and Catherine Ettrick (1726-1794), and so hoped that I might find some traces of them in their son’s papers. The Reverend William Ettrick had an extremely difficult relationship with his father, and so had left Sunderland ‘without a penny in [his] pocket’ as soon as he had turned 21 in order to take up a …read more

Source:: http://www.bars.ac.uk/blog/?p=1658

CfP: Printing Colour 1700-1830

By dustinfrazierwood

Abstracts for posters and 20-minute papers are invited for this three-day, interdisciplinary conference and workshop covering all aspects of the making, collecting and reception of colour prints in the long eighteenth century. The convenors particularly welcome proposals from book historians and scholars of illustration.

Full details and instructions on how to submit are available at

Printing Colour 1700-1830: Discoveries, Rediscoveries and Innovations in the Long Eighteenth Century

10-12 April 2018

Senate House, London & London Collections

Image of James Sadler’s balloon ascent, 12 August 1811 (Wikimedia Commons)

Abstracts for posters and 20-minute papers are invited for this three-day, interdisciplinary conference and workshop covering all aspects of the making, collecting and reception of colour prints in the long eighteenth century. The convenors particularly welcome proposals from book historians and scholars of illustration.

Full details and instructions on how to submit are available at bit.ly/PC1700-1830.

…read more

Source:: https://romanticillustrationnetwork.wordpress.com/2017/06/15/cfp-printing-colour-1700-1830/

Institutions as Networks Programme

By msangster

We’ve just published the full programme for our London workshop, ‘Institutions as Networks’, on the main event page on our website. This workshop will take place on the 13th and 14th of July at the Society of Antiquaries’ premises in London. We’re very excited about the line-up of speakers and think that it promises to be a really fascinating couple of days. If after looking at the programme your interest is piqued, we have a limited number of spaces available for delegates – to make your interest known, please email us on institutionsofliterature@gmail.com. The event has no registration fee and fully catered – all we ask is that if you sign up to attend, you make every effort to do so, as otherwise the costs that we incur will go to waste. Hope to see a number of you in London in July for our second round of discussions!

…read more

Source:: http://institutionsofliterature.net/2017/06/12/institutions-as-networks-programme/

Green grows the Grasmere – the Wordsworthians’ blogger weekend

By Lynn Shepherd

Clouds over Lake Windermere

by Allen Ashley

This part of the Lake District – Grasmere and its environs – has lately rebranded itself as “Wordsworth Country”. And we are told literacy is dying out! Not while there is culture to be gleaned. So, here we all are: writers for The Wordsworth Trust’s Romanticism Blog, gathered for a weekend to celebrate Wordsworth, his poetry, his life, his associates, his dwelling places and, yes, his blasted weather. I wandered lonely as a cloud? There are no lonely clouds in Rydal: they gather in nebulous hordes, descend from the mountain and cloak us in wet mist and, at times, a solid downpour akin to an aerial Rydal Falls.

But precipitation brings lushness, the green and the growth of gardens and landscape that continues to inspire.

My wife Sarah Doyle has bagged the two of us a fabulous first floor room at Rydal Hall with stunning, stately home level views… as well as a sloping floor, resulting in an inclining bed and sloping writing desk that at first I take for an optical illusion. On our final morning we video a 1p coin rolling un-pushed across the table’s surface as scientific proof.

Over the course of the …read more

Source:: https://wordsworth.org.uk/blog/2017/06/12/green-grows-the-grasmere-the-wordsworthians-blogger-weekend/

Conference Report: Romanticism Takes to the Hills

By Anna Mercer

screen-shot-2017-06-08-at-18-32-42

The BARS-sponsored conference ‘Romanticism Takes to the Hills’ was held at Edge Hill University on 29 April 2017. The following conference report is by Hannah Britton (University of St Andrews).

‘Romanticists Take to Edge Hill’

Location, shadowed by its uncomfortable opposite, dislocation, was at the heart of the one-day ‘Romanticism Takes to the Hills’ conference hosted by Edge Hill University, which took place at the end of April. The gentle word-play of the title (the second in a triad that includes last year’s successful ‘Edgy Romanticism/Romanticism on Edge’ and what I’m reliably informed will be next year’s ‘Romanticism Goes to University’) set the stage for a day that would see Romanticism and its embodied figures climb mountains and scramble back down them (most likely on all fours), travel along the British coastline as well as through the Wye valley, and head to distant shores. Those of us who gathered at Edge Hill’s leafy, out-of-the-way campus came from all over—from the nearby universities of the North-West of England and the Midlands, to the far-flung edges of Scotland (the six-hour journey from St Andrews on the previous day, I think, permits me this liberty), to Denmark, Sweden, Italy, and the United …read more

Source:: http://www.bars.ac.uk/blog/?p=1653

Archive Spotlight, ‘A Book and a Bard: Romantic Poetry and the Commonplace Book of Thomas Gray’

By Anna Mercer

katherineblog

This year on the BARS blog we are reviving the ‘Archive Spotlight’ series. We present new and exciting posts from BARS members and blog readers on their studies at various archives. Please get in touch if you want to contribute – the posts can be an account of the archive itself, or some things you’ve studied there that relate to the Romantic Period. Katherine Fender (University of Oxford) starts us off with a post on her time at Pembroke College Library, University of Cambridge.

A Book and a Bard: Romantic Poetry and the Commonplace Book of Thomas Gray

John Martin, “The Bard”, (c. 1817) (c) Laing Art Gallery

The manuscript to which my doctoral research is most deeply indebted is one over which I had pored even before the first word of my thesis had been written. Similarly, the text itself predates what we generally consider to be the “Romantic period” in literature – though my thesis was firmly rooted in all things Romantic: in the poetry and aesthetic theory of the period. Why then, you may ask, is this pre-Romantic text of any significance to a Romanticism blog?

The answer is that my thesis simply could never, and …read more

Source:: http://www.bars.ac.uk/blog/?p=1646