Romantic Circles Praxis Volume Announcement

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By Emily Paterson-Morgan

Romantic Circles is pleased to publish a new Praxis volume: The Sundry Faces of Nineteenth-Century Anglo-Jewish Literature, edited and introduced by Karen Weisman.

This volume brings together essays that highlight the breadth of nineteenth-century Anglo-Jewish writers’ engagement with thematic and aesthetic preoccupations. Exploring aesthetic choices of Jewish writers whose political and cultural contexts put pressure on such choices, this collection features essays by Michael Scrivener, Heidi Kaufman, Sarah Gracombe, and Meri-Jane Rochelson.

You can find these new essays here.

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Source:: http://www.bars.ac.uk/blog/?p=3404

Call for Papers – The Hazlitt Review 14 (2021)

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By Emily Paterson-Morgan

The Hazlitt Society is currently inviting contributions to the fourteenth issue (2021) of The Hazlitt Review.

Articles on any aspect of William Hazlitt’s work and life, or relating Hazlitt to wider Romantic themes and circles, are welcome. Submissions should be between 4000 and 9000 words in length, and follow MHRA style.

Please email submissions by 1 March 2021 to Philipp Hunnekuhl (philipphunnekuhl@gmail.com), to whom you may also direct any queries.

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Source:: http://www.bars.ac.uk/blog/?p=3399

Funded Doctoral Award – Under the Volcano: Visitors to Vesuvius in the Romantic Era

By Emily Paterson-Morgan

Applications are invited for an Open-Oxford-Cambridge AHRC DTP-funded Collaborative Doctoral Award at the University of Oxford, in partnership with Dove Cottage, Grasmere.

Supervisory team: Professor Catriona Seth (Faculty of Medieval and Modern Languages, University of Oxford) and Jeff Cowton MBE (Dove Cottage)

Wordsworth famously wrote ‘On the Departure of Sir Walter Scott from Abbotsford, for Naples’. Like the author of Ivanhoe, French-language writers, among them Staël, Lamartine, Chateaubriand, Bonstetten, Gautier… visited Naples and were inspired by the town and its surroundings. The environment drew them to evoke the sea and volcanic eruptions, to reflect on the inscription of history in the landscape, from Antiquity to contemporary upheavals. To many of them, setting foot on Neapolitan soil, things were both familiar and exotic. The port was a gateway to Africa, a hub for exchanges between North and South. The archaeological surveys in Pompeii and Herculaneum with the uncovering of frescoes and artefacts drew tourists back to their cultural heritage. The vedute painted by Volaire, John Warwick Smith and other (often less talented) painters graced many a wall throughout Northern Europe.

There is no study of Naples as viewed by late Enlightenment and Romantic French-language visitors. Noli’s 1928 Les romantiques français et l’Italie, Montègre’s massive …read more

Source:: http://www.bars.ac.uk/blog/?p=3397

BARS Digital Events – ‘Romantic Studies in 2020’ Recording Now Online

By Anna Mercer

The British Association for Romantic Studies (BARS) is delighted to announce that the first session of our new Digital Events programme is now available as a recording on YouTube.

Thank you to everyone who joined us over Zoom for a roundtable discussion between Professor James Chandler, Professor Ian Duncan, Dr Katie Garner, Professor Essaka Joshua, and Professor Fiona Stafford on the topic of ‘Romantic Studies in 2020: Perspectives on the Field’, chaired by BARS Vice President Dr Gillian Dow. During this session, our guests presented perspectives on their current research and teaching before discussing the challenges faced by scholars and students of Romanticism in 2020, after which the audience were invited to take part in a moderated Q&A session.

about the speakers here.

CALL FOR PAPERS: Special Issue “Romanticism and the Public Humanities”

By Emily Paterson-Morgan

Editor: Dr. Elizabeth Effinger (University of New Brunswick) e.effinger@unb.ca

This proposed special issue of Romantic Circles Pedagogy Commons will explore the relationship between Romanticism and the public humanities. The public humanities is an engaged scholarship that is meaningfully informed by the public, one that, as Julie Ellison and Timothy Eatman write, “contributes to the public good and yields artifacts of public and intellectual value” (“Scholarship in Public,” iv).

A core belief to this kind of pedagogy is that the public humanities works to imagine a more just future. How, as students and teachers of Romanticism, might our academic area help us dream together? What does a public humanities informed by Romantic thought look like? How does the public shape the research in our field? How have Romantic scholars turned their work to be public facing? What are the benefits and challenges in making our field and our classrooms more public facing? How can teaching Romanticism inspire community building and civic change? Can making Romanticism more public collude with the aspirations of the undercommons, the name that Fred Moten and Stefano Harney give to those scholars resisting and unworking the neoliberal and (neo)colonial university? These are some of the questions that papers …read more

Source:: http://www.bars.ac.uk/blog/?p=3389

BARS Digital Events: ‘Digital Editions in Romantic Studies’

By Anna Mercer

Following the success of our first session on ‘Perspectives on the Field‘, the British Association for Romantic Studies (BARS) is delighted to announce the second session of our new Digital Events programme.  Please join us on Thursday 26 November at 5pm GMT on Zoom for a roundtable discussion between  Professor Lynda Pratt, Dr. Sophie Coulombeau, Dr. Corrina Readioff, and Ben Wilkinson-Turnbull on the topic of ‘Digital Editions in Romantic Studies’, chaired by BARS President, Professor Anthony Mandal. During this 80-minute session, our guests will introduce and discuss the work they have undertaken on creating and providing digital collections, their rationales for doing so, any challenges faced by such projects, and the benefits and advantages of digital editions and digital networks in research, in teaching, and in outreach and dissemination. After this, the audience will be invited to take part in a moderated Q&A session. 

Book tickets via Eventbrite here.

Propose your own event for the BARS Digital Events series by 13 November 2020. Full details here.

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Source:: http://www.bars.ac.uk/blog/?p=3379

Queen Caroline in Caricature – October 1820

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By Emily Paterson-Morgan

In October 1820 the trial of Queen Caroline drew towards a close and the political tensions of the nation reached a fever pitch. For over two months, normal parliamentary business had been paralysed by the daily spectacle of Caroline’s procession to the House of Lords. As George IV and Prime Minister Lord Liverpool became increasingly nervous about the verdict, Caroline’s supporters grew ever more vocal.

To read more about the ritualistic acts of political theatre which culminated in a dazzling array of satirical prints, “the vox populi at its most resonant and effectual”, read the new piece by Ian Haywood (University of Roehampton) on the Romantic Illustrations Network.

Click here to read more about this fascinating topic (and chortle over the ridiculous, the rude, and sometimes downright risqué satirical prints).

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Source:: http://www.bars.ac.uk/blog/?p=3376

Table Talks 1: New Approaches to Romanticism and the Natural World

By Emily Paterson-Morgan

BOOKING NOW OPEN

Booking is now open for the first of of the ‘Tables Talks’, part of ‘The Romantic Ridiculous’ project funded by the AHRC (details of the project here).

‘Table Talks’ were a famous genre of literature in the early nineteenth century, recording the conversation of well-known writers, such as Samuel Taylor Coleridge, William Hazlitt, and Charles Lamb. Edge Hill University will host a series of modern Table Talks – interactive workshops led by relevant scholars in the field of Romantic Studies, with an aim to explore new perspectives on Romantic aesthetics, Romantic engagement with nature, society, and childhood, as well as later representations of Romantics and Romanticism. These ‘Table Talks’ will be structured as informal workshops bringing together established academics with postgraduate students and early career scholars to discuss new methodologies in Romantic Studies.

Join an excellent group of academics on Wednesday 16th December from 6pm to 8 pm for an evening of close readings highlighting new approaches to nature in Romantic Studies.

Bring your own mulled wine and mince pies or seasonal alternative.

Register via the link for this free, online event – open to all! Click here to register

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Source:: http://www.bars.ac.uk/blog/?p=3373