BARS Exchange

BARS Exchange

Aggregated blogs on Romantic Studies – please click through to read full posts.

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Call for Papers: Byron and Loss

By Emily Paterson-Morgan

2020 Newstead Abbey Byron Conference

24th-25th April, as Newstead Abbey

2020 marks the bicentenary of a troubling year. George III had lost his life and the new king George IV was
rapidly losing what little shreds remained of his dignity, lost what little shreds remained of his dignity, pursuing
his errant wife with hypocritical vengeance during the so-called Queen Caroline Affair. The government had lost
the trust of the people, and many politicians would have lost their lives had the Cato Street Conspiracy
succeeded. Meanwhile Byron, now in the fourth year of his self-imposed exile, was rapidly losing his hair, teeth,
famous good looks, and – some might argue – his own dignity. It is against this backdrop that he became
interested in Italian politics, or rather the loss of political authority and national autonomy.


To mark the year of 1820, we welcome papers considering the theme of Byron and loss. Topics could include, but are not limited to:

  • Grief, familial loss and suicide
  • Melancholy, weltschmerz, Romantic melancholia
  • Material and aesthetic losses
  • Appetite and diet
  • Loss of status, land, and national autonomy
  • Loss of love, lovers, and spouses
  • Religious convictions and anxieties
  • Idealism and political convictions
  • Anxieties about poetic reputation and legacy
  • Writer’s block and poetic inspiration
  • Financial losses, economic instability and usury
  • Ruins and degeneration

Submissions by 1st February 2020. Send …read more

Source:: http://www.bars.ac.uk/blog/?p=2782

Dreaming Romantic Europe, Workshop 2 “Romantic Authorship”

By Emily Paterson-Morgan

Conference Report by Alice Rhodes, University of York.

On Friday 18th October 2019 members of European Romanticisms in Association (ERA) were lucky enough to gather in the beautiful Italian city of Ravenna for the second meeting of the AHRC funded Dreaming Romantic Europe network, headed up by PI Professor Nicola J Watson (Open University) and Co-I Professor Catriona Seth (University of Oxford). The workshop, which took place in the Antichi Chiostri Francescani, next door to Dante’s tomb and just a short walk from Lord Byron and Teresa Guiccioli’s home in Ravenna, addressed the theme of “Romantic Authorship.” Over two days, delegates explored how the ideology and celebrity of Romantic authorship was supported, elaborated, and transmitted by objects through a fast-paced series of diverse, original, and thought-provoking presentations. We were delighted to welcome speakers working in academia and heritage across Europe, with representation from France, Germany, Hungary, Italy, the Netherlands, Poland, Switzerland and the UK.

On Friday, attendees began the day with an introduction to the project from Professor Nicola Watson before making the short walk to Palazzo Guiccioli, home of Countess Teresa Guiccioli, where Lord Byron lived between 1819 and 1821. The building is also the location of …read more

Source:: http://www.bars.ac.uk/blog/?p=2766

CRECS 2019-20: Spring

By annamercer90 We’ve now finalised the speakers and dates for our 2019-20 spring series of research seminars. All events start at 6pm, room details TBC. We hope you can join us! 18 Feb Dr Lizzy Spencer (University of York) ‘Women, accounting, and intertextuality in England c.1680-1830′ 9 Mar Prof Tim Webb (University of Bristol) ‘Leigh Hunt and Romantic Imprisonment’ … Continue reading CRECS 2019-20: Spring …read more

Source:: https://crecs.wordpress.com/2019/12/10/crecs-2019-20-spring/

Romantic Reimaginings: Auden, MacNeice, Yeats, and Shelley’s West Wind

By Eleanor Bryan

Romantic Reimaginings is a BARS blog series which seeks to explore the ways in which texts of the Romantic era continue to resonate. The blog is curated by Eleanor Bryan. If you would like to publish an article in the series, please email ebryan@lincoln.ac.uk.

Today on the blog, Amanda Blake Davis discusses Auden, MacNeice, Yeats, and Shelley’s West Wind.

B. Shelley, fair copy of Ode to the West Wind Shelfmark: MS. Shelley adds. e. 12 (pp. 62-63) Credit: Bodleian Library, University of Oxford (via Shelley’s Ghost )

‘Like Yeats’s poetry’, Edna Longley writes, ‘MacNeice’s descends from the non-Wordsworthian branch of Romanticism’,[1] and one of MacNeice’s greatest Romantic influences is Shelley, who is invariably filtered through Yeats. Following Yeats, for whom Prometheus Unbound was ‘a sacred book’,[2] MacNeice exalts Prometheus Unbound as ‘one of my sacred books’ and recounts how he ‘swilled the rhythms of Shelley, the sweet champagne of his wishful thinking and schoolboy anger, his Utopias of amethyst and starlight’.[3] ‘What we wanted was “realism”’, MacNeice writes of the ‘Auden Group’, ‘but—so the paradox goes on—we wanted it for romantic reasons’.[4] MacNeice publicly disavows Shelley in his study of Yeats through …read more

Source:: http://www.bars.ac.uk/blog/?p=2759

BARS STEPHEN COPLEY RESEARCH AWARDS 2020

By Anna Mercer

Postgraduates and early career scholars working in the area of Romanticism are invited to apply for a Stephen Copley Research Award. The BARS Executive Committee has established the bursaries in order to help fund expenses incurred through travel to libraries and archives, up to a maximum of £500. A postgraduate must be enrolled on a doctoral programme in the UK; an early career scholar is defined as someone who holds a PhD (from the UK) but has not held a permanent academic post for more than three years by the application deadline. Application for the awards is competitive, and cannot be made retrospectively.

Successful applicants must be members of BARS before taking up the award. The names of recipients will be announced on the BARS website and social media, and successful applicants will be asked to submit a short report to the BARS Executive Committee within four weeks of the completion of the research trip and to acknowledge BARS in their doctoral thesis and/or any publication. Reports may also be published on the BARS Blog where this is appropriate. Previous winners or applicants are encouraged to apply again.

Please send the following information in support of your application (up to …read more

Source:: http://www.bars.ac.uk/blog/?p=2764

GTA PhD Studentships at Edge Hill University

By Emily Paterson-Morgan

Edge Hill University has launched its annual Graduate Teaching Assistant scheme. Each GTA studentship includes a ‘package’ with a total value in excess of £20,000 for UK and EU students and £30,000 for International students per annum. This includes:

  • A stipend of £9,180 per annum
  • Full waiver of research degree tuition fees worth £4,300 per annum for UK and EU students and £13,750 per annum for international students
  • £5,500 per annum to contribute to the cost of accommodation or free single room postgraduate student accommodation on campus (subject to availability)
  • Full waiver of the Postgraduate Certificate in Teaching in Higher Education tuition fee (worth £1740)

It’s an exciting time to be a nineteenth-century researcher at Edge Hill! The university is home to EHU Nineteen: an interdisciplinary research group fostering outstanding research and teaching in nineteenth century topics; collaborative opportunities with museums, galleries and heritage partners in the North West and UK; a visiting speaker series and conference programme including hosting BARS/NASSR 2021.

We welcome proposals on any aspect of nineteenth-century history, literature and culture, and we would be particularly pleased to supervise projects in the following fields:

  • Nineteenth-century print culture
  • Romantic, Victorian and Fin de Siècle literature
  • Children’s literature
  • Gothic and sensation fiction
  • Gender and sexuality

We would be delighted to …read more

Source:: http://www.bars.ac.uk/blog/?p=2750

CFP – The Prospect of Improvement: A Bluestocking Landscape

By Emily Paterson-Morgan

A two-day conference at Hagley Hall, Worcestershire including a tour of the house and grounds supported by Elizabeth Montagu Correspondence Online [EMCO] and Paul Mellon Centre for Studies in British Art.

8-9th September 2020

Plenary speakers

Dr Stephen Bending (University of Southampton, author of Green Retreats. Women, gardens and eighteenth-century culture (2013)

Professor Markman Ellis (Queen Mary, University of London), author of The Coffee House: A Cultural History (2005)

Dr Joe Hawkins (Head of Landscape at Hagley)

Dr Steve Hindle (Huntington Library, CA) W.M. Keck Foundation Director of Research.

Our conference puts centre stage the patriotism and patronage of George Lyttelton first baron Lyttelton (1709-1773), a strangely shadowy figure yet a fascinating eminence grise behind the art and politics of his age. We will discuss the motivation behind his extensive remodelling of his grounds and the commissioning of local architect Sanderson Miller (1716-1780) in designing a new Hagley Hall. How can the ideas of other architects and landscape reformers from the midlands such as Sir Roger Newdigate (1719-1806), Sir Uvedale Price (1747-1829) and William Shenstone (1714-1763) be brought into dialogue with Miller’s project?

As EMCO is editing the correspondence of Lord Lyttelton’s friend and literary collaborator, critic Elizabeth Montagu (1718-1800), we will equally focus on eighteenth-century women’s management …read more

Source:: http://www.bars.ac.uk/blog/?p=2748

Keats Foundation Annual Lecture 2020

By Emily Paterson-Morgan

‘Between the Downs and the Sea: Romantics in Sussex’

By Alexandra Harris, author of Weatherlands: Writers and Artists under English Skies, and Romantic Moderns: English Writers, Artists and the Imagination, from Virginia Woolf to John Piper.

‘Nothing worth speaking of’ happened on Keats’s 1819 excursion over the South Downs to Chichester and then to Bedhampton – nothing except most of The Eve of St Agnes and The Eve of St Mark. William Blake referred to his Sussex years as a ‘slumber on the banks of the ocean’, but it was a fruitful sleep in which Chichester appeared as a version of Jerusalem. William Collins, who spent most of his life in Chichester, catches the music of his ‘native plains’ in some of his most influential odes. This lecture will consider Keats and his predecessors in this small part of Sussex, and will explore more broadly the relationship between place and poetry.

Alexandra Harris will speak on Saturday 7 March 2020 at 5 pm.

For more details, visit the Keats House website.

…read more

Source:: http://www.bars.ac.uk/blog/?p=2746

London-Paris Romanticism Seminar: Mary-Ann Constantine, Friday 13 December 2019, Senate House, University of London

By LPRS

constantine ad

The next meeting of the London-Paris Romanticism Seminar will take place on Friday 13 December in the Bloomsbury Room (G35, ground floor) at Senate House, University of London, starting at 5.30. As our guest speaker, we are delighted to welcome Dr Mary-Ann Constantine of the University of Wales Centre for Advanced Welsh and Celtic Studies, who will present a paper entitled A Welsh Bard Walking: Pedestrianism, Place and Politics in 1802. This will be followed by a discussion and wine reception. The event is free and open to everyone, including postgraduates and members of the public. No booking is required.

Mary-Ann Constantine is Reader at the University of Wales Centre for Advanced Welsh and Celtic Studies. She researches the literature and history of Romantic-period Wales and Brittany, and has a particular interest in travel writing and in the cultural politics of the 1790s. With Dafydd Johnston she was general editor of the ten-volume series Wales and the French Revolution (2012-15). Other publications include The Truth Against the World: Iolo Morganwg and Romantic Forgery (2007) and (jointly edited with Nigel Leask) Enlightenment Travel and British Identities: Thomas Pennant’s Tours in Scotland and Wales (2017). She …read more

Source:: http://londonparisromantic.com/?p=1274

Romantic Reimaginings: Mapping Keats’s Progress

By Eleanor Bryan

Romantic Reimaginings is a BARS blog series which seeks to explore the ways in which texts of the Romantic era continue to resonate. The blog is curated by Eleanor Bryan. If you would like to publish an article in the series, please email ebryan@lincoln.ac.uk.

Today on the blog, Suzie Grogan discusses the reimagining of Keats’s journey through the Mapping Keats’s Progress website.

As students of Romantic poet John Keats we might sit, hushed, in a library surrounded by books. We may have open next to us the latest critical thinking, the biographies by Roe, Motion, Gittings, Bate. In our files we may have, printed off, the latest academic papers or edited collections of the same. Or we could be trawling JSTOR or British Library sites, intent on ensuring we miss nothing, note everything.

Mapping Keats’s Progress website

But reimagine that scene. We could be sitting quietly at a computer, or in a café with our tablet, perusing the Mapping Keats’s Progress website at http://johnkeats.uvic.ca/ notebook beside us, finding and re-finding, reflecting and diverging and walking with Keats through his development as man and poet, using location and life events to associate and connect in a way that is more difficult when …read more

Source:: http://www.bars.ac.uk/blog/?p=2740