BARS Exchange

BARS Exchange

Aggregated blogs on Romantic Studies – please click through to read full posts.

Archive for July 2014

Lost Letters

By hardeepssidhu

Letter2April1804_DetailOfObject2

A few months back, I wrote a post about compiling a master list of all of Blake’s letters. The goal is to have an up-to-date bibliography of every letter that Blake ever wrote or received, along with letters by Blake’s contemporaries that have to do with him in some way.

As I’ve been putting this list together, I’ve come across a number of letters that pose a substantial obstacle to publishing them. Not only have these letters never been published before, they have never even been traced. We know about these lost letters only because of other writings (other letters, journals, logs, etc.) refer to them. For example, Blake’s letter of 2 April 1804 says that he had sent a letter to his solicitor, R. Dally, “a fortnight ago.” But the letter he refers to has never been located.

From Blake’s letter of 2 April 1804, which refers to another letter that is now lost

At present, the Blake Archive communicates information about untraced works (or at least their existence) through “Related Works” pages. For an illuminated book like Songs of Innocence and of Experience, related works include alternate copies of the same work. The related works page for …read more

Source: http://blakearchive.wordpress.com/2014/07/30/lost-letters/

Writing beyond the self …

Picture
I’m just back from teaching a week-long residential writing course with friend and collaborator Ty Newydd, July 2014
C

Cornwall’s poem had been inspired by a grisly short story written in the voice of a murderer, Gosschen’s Diary (1818), penned by Keats’s reviewing bete noir, J. G. Lockhart. Both Cornwall’s verse drama and Lockhart’s gothic story in turn became major influences on Browning’s “Porphyria’s Lover” – an intriguing “escape route” for an experimental aspect of Romantic aesthetic into the Victorian age.

The week, spent with such a wonderful group of inspiring and talented writers at Ty Newydd – given additional spice by superb readings from the poet Kathryn Simmonds and writer and activist Kevin Powell – sent me back to the Romantics in other ways. Damian and I wished to address the dramatic monologue as a form that takes us “beyond self” to get back to self, an approach that offered a different “take” on the post-Romantic “I” in contemporary poetry, where Romanticism’s self-representation as the only veridical, authentic mode of composition, predicated on the heroic articulation of first-hand experience, still has currency. We wanted our thrown voices to resist the post-Romantic …read more

Source:: http://www.richardmarggrafturley.com/blog/writing-beyond-the-self

Writing beyond the self …

Picture
I’m just back from teaching a week-long residential writing course with friend and collaborator Ty Newydd, July 2014
C

Cornwall’s poem had been inspired by a grisly short story written in the voice of a murderer, Gosschen’s Diary (1818), penned by Keats’s reviewing bete noir, J. G. Lockhart. Both Cornwall’s verse drama and Lockhart’s gothic story in turn became major influences on Browning’s “Porphyria’s Lover” – an intriguing “escape route” for an experimental aspect of Romantic aesthetic into the Victorian age.

The week, spent with such a wonderful group of inspiring and talented writers at Ty Newydd – given additional spice by superb readings from the poet Kathryn Simmonds and writer and activist Kevin Powell – sent me back to the Romantics in other ways. Damian and I wished to address the dramatic monologue as a form that takes us “beyond self” to get back to self, an approach that offered a different “take” on the post-Romantic “I” in contemporary poetry, where Romanticism’s self-representation as the only veridical, authentic mode of composition predicated on the heroic articulation of first-hand experience still has currency. We wanted our thrown voices to resist the post-Romantic …read more

Source: http://richardmarggrafturley.weebly.com/blog/writing-beyond-the-self

Five Questions: Chris Murray on Tragic Coleridge

By admin

Chris Murray - Tragic Coleridge

Chris Murray is currently a Junior Research Fellow in the Department of English Studies at Durham University. Previously, he completed a PhD at the University of Warwick, worked at the University of Bristol and taught for two years at Nanyang Technological University in Singapore. His research focuses on dialogues between British Romanticism and works and discourses in other national, historical and generic traditions. His first monograph, Tragic Coleridge, which we discuss in the interview below, was published by Ashgate last year.

1) How did you first become interested in Coleridge’s uses of tragedy?

I’ve always been interested in Classics, and there are many allusions to ancient literature in Coleridge’s poems. In particular, Coleridge’s discussion of the ancient tragic trilogy caught my attention. He suggests that all Greek tragedies formed part of a trilogy whose outcome was ultimately positive. He wrote a play according to that very model, called Zapolya, which was staged in London in 1818. The flavour of that play is closer to The Winter’s Tale than to King Oedipus, because the idea of restoration accords with Coleridge’s sense of how tragedy …read more

Source: http://www.bars.ac.uk/blog/?p=363

Publication Announcement – Thel copy N and Enoch Walked with God

By Andrea H. Everett

​Enoch Walked with God

The William Blake Archive is pleased to announce the publication of an electronic edition of The Book of Thel copy N and Enoch Walked with God, both in the Cincinnati Art Museum. We have also republished Songs of Innocence copy U with a more authoritative arrangement of the plates and an enhanced Copy Information page.

Thel is dated 1789 by Blake on the title page, but the first plate (Thel’s Motto) and the last (her descent into the netherworld) appear to have been completed and first printed in 1790, while Blake was working on The Marriage of Heaven and Hell. Copy N, never before reproduced, was printed and colored c. 1818 along with copy O. It is one of sixteen extant copies, ten of which are in the Blake Archive—including copy O—and four of which are in preparation for future publication. Like copy O, copy N was printed in orange ink on Ruse & Turners paper, watermarked 1815, beautifully colored, numbered by Blake in pen and ink, and bound with Thel’s Motto as the last instead of the first of the book’s eight plates. Unlike copy O, its plates have a single orange line framing …read more

Source: http://blakearchive.wordpress.com/2014/07/25/publication-announcement-thel-copy-n-and-enoch-walked-with-god/

A Grammar of Gothic (Aguirre)

By Anthony Mandal The Northanger Library Project (HUM2006-03404) was a three-year state-sponsored project (2006–09) that sought to study the rise of gothic literature against the background of the ‘long’ eighteenth century in Britain. The central concern of the NLP was the edition and study of long-neglected gothic texts, beginning with the ‘canon’ of gothic novels immortalised in Jane […] …read more

Source: http://www.romtext.org.uk/reports/rt21_n07/

Reverse Pygmalionism (McCue)

By Anthony Mandal This paper resituates Samuel Rogers’s influential work Italy within the wider context of Britain’s post-Waterloo visual–verbal culture. Rogers’s illustrated multi-generic travel book made the Italian peninsula accessible to its upwardly mobile middle-class audience through its miscellaneous nature, its poems, tales, travelogues, treatment of art, antiquarian asides and translation of key Italian authors. It was one of the nineteenth century’s best-selling texts, but it did not start out that way. Indeed, it would take Rogers over a decade in order to produce a profitable object. This article examines this process and the ways in which Rogers responded to key developments in the commercial print market, especially the growing popularity for keepsakes and annuals, in order to register the publishing market’s dependency on word-image constellations, Britain’s changing relationship with Italy, and, ultimately, the growing purchasing power of a middle-class, female audience. …read more

Source: http://www.romtext.org.uk/articles/rt21_n06/

The Protean Poet (Killick)

By Anthony Mandal Since his rise to fame in the early nineteenth century, Byron and his work have been significant subjects for visual art, from book illustration to oil painting. This essay explores Byronic art across the nineteenth and twentieth centuries, taking as a case study the treatment of his late narrative poem, Don Juan. Byron’s wide-ranging appeal was a result of both the popularity of his poetry and the public fascination with his life, but it was also determined by the multiple, fluid qualities of his work which facilitated a huge variety of readings across the centuries. Here, the visual implications of these ways of reading are considered, and the essay argues that pictorial Byronism played an important role in presenting evolving perceptions of the broader Romantic movement. …read more

Source: http://www.romtext.org.uk/articles/rt21_n05/

Introducing: Blake’s French Revolution

By lvandenb

Title page of William Blake's French Revolution: A Poem

A couple of us at the Blake Archive have taken on Blake’s 1791 poem French Revolution as a new typographic project. We use many of the same principles established in early publications of typographic works. Thus, after working out some important typographic questions on the Descriptive Catalog, the French Revolution transcription appears to be fairly straightforward.

What is perhaps more interesting about the poem French Revolution is the history of the work itself. In honor of the recent passing of Bastille Day (July 14th) a blog post of the publication history (or lack of publication history) of this work seemed timely.

Blake originally intended for the work to be seven books, yet only the first book survives. This first book is available in proof form, as it appears it was set in type in 1791 but never actually published by its printer, Joseph Johnson. There is only one known surviving copy of the original proofs, housed in the Huntington Library, who has shared the proofs with us.

There is a great deal of conjecture but little historical evidence as to why the first book was never published. Supporters of the French Revolution, like Joseph Johnson, faced increasing pressure at home, which …read more

Source: http://blakearchive.wordpress.com/2014/07/23/introducing-blake-french-revolution/

Walter Scott and James Skene (Hill)

By Anthony Mandal This essay contends that Skene, Scott’s amateur-artist friend, was often used as a visual research assistant for many scenes contained within the Waverley novels. Skene became an advisor to some of the earliest illustrations of Scott’s novels that were produced beyond Scotland. In the introduction to the fourth canto of Marmion, dedicated to Skene, Scott writes: ‘The shepherd, who in summer sun, | Had something of our envy won, | As thou with pencil, I with pen, | The features traced of hill and glen’. This glimpse of Skene sketching next to Scott reveals a significant aspect to their friendship: Skene’s sketches were used as aides-memoire, visual references or even inspirations to Scott’s literary imagination for many descriptive topographical or architectural passages within his novels. Through close readings of the novels, Scott’s correspondence and Skene’s own memoir, Hill establishes that Skene contributed signgiicant visual stimuli for a number of Scott’s works. …read more

Source: http://www.romtext.org.uk/articles/walter-scott-and-james-skene-hill/