BARS Exchange

BARS Exchange

Aggregated blogs on Romantic Studies – please click through to read full posts.

Archive for November 2014

The Last Man on Earth

By Catherine Redford

J. M. W. Turner’s ‘The Last Man’ (1837)

I was recently asked to write a post for the Wordsworth Trust’s fantastic new Wordsworth and Romanticism blog on the figure of the Last Man on Earth in Romantic literature. Regular readers of my blog will know that this was the subject of my PhD thesis, which I’m now revising for publication, so of course I jumped at the chance to get people thinking about the significance of Last Man literature! I’ve re-posted my contribution below, but the original article can be found here. If you haven’t taken the opportunity to look at the other posts on the Wordsworth and Romanticism blog yet then I’d really recommend that you do; there have been over 30 short articles published so far on a wide range of Romantic topics.

The Last Man on Earth in Romantic Literature

One glorious summer’s day in 1816, Lord Byron and Percy Bysshe Shelley stood together on the shores of Lake Geneva in Switzerland, quietly contemplating the brilliant expanse of water as the sun glinted off its surface. Suddenly, Shelley turned to Byron and exclaimed, his words sending a shiver of …read more

Source:: http://www.catherineredford.co.uk/2014/11/the-last-man-on-earth.html

Blake’s Madness

By mspeer2014

Wikipedia says that

“Although Blake was considered mad by contemporaries for his idiosyncratic views, he is held in high regard by later critics for his expressiveness and creativity, and for the philosophical and mystical undercurrents within his work.”

I wonder whether this is anything like a useful opposition, in the sense that I doubt most “later critics” would make a case for Blake’s sanity as a necessary condition for his “expressiveness and creativity, and for the philosophical and mystical undercurrents within his work.” It seems to me more like we just don’t care if Blake was mad or not because of his “expressiveness and creativity,” etc. etc.. It is certainly not an either-or scenario. However, the fact that my colleagues and I spend our time digitally archiving the works of a madman certainly cheers me on the days (more and more frequently, as the end of the semester approaches) when I feel like this guy:

…read more

Source:: https://blakearchive.wordpress.com/2014/11/12/blake-madman/

BARS First Book Prize

By admin

Readers

The British Association for Romantic Studies

is delighted to announce the launch of

The British Association for Romantic Studies
First Book Prize

Awarded biennially for the best first monograph in Romantic Studies, this prize is open to first monographs published between January 2013 and January 2015. In keeping with the remit of the British Association for Romantic Studies, it is designed to encourage and recognise original, ground-breaking and interdisciplinary work in the literature and culture of the period 1780-1830. The prize will be awarded to the value of £250 and will be presented at the BARS biennial conference, ‘Romantic Imprints’, to be held at Cardiff University in July 2015.

Eligibility and nomination procedures

The competition is open to scholarly monographs by authors who have not published a monograph before. Books must be nominated through the BARS membership. Nominations should attest to the importance of the book within the field, detailing its particular strengths and describing the nature of its original contribution. They should be no longer than one side of A4 in length. Please send nominations to the Secretary of BARS, Helen Stark (Helen.Stark@newcastle.ac.uk) by the closing date, January 31, 2015. The BARS Executive will provide the panel of judges, which …read more

Source:: http://www.bars.ac.uk/blog/?p=471

BARS President’s Letter 2014

By admin

Book of Thel

Dear BARS members,

We are coming up to that time of the year again when we will be asking you to renew your subscriptions to BARS for another year. This gives me a chance in my capacity as President of BARS to remind you of the benefits which subscription brings to you and to the field in general. We aim as an association to promote the best work in romanticism with a special interest in inter and cross disciplinarity, and we aim to support scholars at every stage of their careers, from those just starting out to the very experienced.

This year you will have noticed that in addition to the e-mail alerts that as a member you regularly receive, notifying you of events and publications, the BARS website now boasts a regular blog featuring interviews with scholars in the field and hosts the redesigned and relaunched BARS Review with a bumper edition of reviews. If you haven’t yet visited the site, you are missing out.

Activities this year have included the very successful BARS post-graduate biennial conference …read more

Source:: http://www.bars.ac.uk/blog/?p=465

Teaching Romanticism IX: Charlotte Smith

By danielcook by Daniel Cook As part of this ongoing series on Teaching Romanticism we will consider the ways in which we lecture on and discuss individual authors, whether during author-specific modules or broader period surveys. I thought it would be particularly useful to hear about which texts educators use and in what context, whether they place […] …read more

Source:: http://www.romtext.org.uk/teaching-romanticism-ix-charlotte-smith/

Teaching Romanticism VIII: Mary Robinson

By danielcook by Daniel Cook As part of this ongoing series on Teaching Romanticism we will consider the ways in which we lecture on and discuss individual authors, whether during author-specific modules or broader period surveys. I thought it would be particularly useful to hear about which texts educators use and in what context, whether they place […] …read more

Source:: http://www.romtext.org.uk/teaching-romanticism-viii-mary-robinson/

Blake’s Track Changes

By Eric Loy

Manuscript page of William Blake's Vala, or the Four Zoas.

Clarity is elusive—a particularly ironic characteristic of a manuscript that Blake so heavily marked up with instructions on how to read it.

Of course, reading is one thing. Encoding is another.

Check out the opening paragraph of Vala, or the Four Zoas:

First, Blake provides several sets of line numbers to determine the final poetic sequence. Second, lines are drawn connecting inscriptions to spaces on the page.

As documentary editors, we are committed to the physical artifact, not Blake’s final intentions. So, of course, we don’t alter our transcription to “complete” Blake’s revisions. But we are interested in describing certain textual relationships between discrete physical inscriptions that seem to be working together to complete an identifiable act of composition. (We do it all the time with substitutions, deletions, insertions, etc. that are often multi-step acts of revision.)

But the marks pointed out in the example above are of a different variety—numbers and drawn lines that are not “content” but rather compositional instructions.

An outside observer might suggest we just encode the numbers into the lines of content and skip the drawn lines altogether, or include them in a note. But then I would suggest flipping a few pages to …read more

Source:: https://blakearchive.wordpress.com/2014/11/06/blake-track-changes/