BARS Exchange

BARS Exchange

Aggregated blogs on Romantic Studies – please click through to read full posts.

Archive for December 2014

Call for Copley Bursary Applications

By admin

Postgraduates working in the area of Romantic Studies are invited to apply for a Stephen Copley Postgraduate Research Award. The BARS Executive Committee has established the awards in order to support postgraduate research. They are intended to help fund expenses incurred through travel to libraries and archives necessary to the student’s research, up to a maximum of £300. Applications for the awards are competitive, and cannot be made retrospectively. Applicants must be members of BARS (to join please visit our website: www.bars.ac.uk).

The names of recipients will be announced on the BARS website, and successful applicants will be asked to submit a short report to the BARS Executive Committee and to acknowledge BARS in their doctoral thesis and/or any publication arising from the research trip. Previous winners or applicants are more than welcome to apply.

Please send the following information in support of your application (2-3 pages of A4 in word.doc format):

1. Your full name and institutional affiliation.
2. The working title and a short abstract or summary of your PhD project.
3. Details of the research to be undertaken for which you need support, and its relation to your PhD project.
4. …read more

Source:: http://www.bars.ac.uk/blog/?p=513

Five Questions: Richard De Ritter on Imagining Women Readers

By admin

Richard de Ritter - Imagining Women Readers

Richard De Ritter is a Lecturer in the Long Eighteenth Century at the University of Leeds. He has a particular interest in women’s writing, having published articles on Maria Edgeworth and domesticity; Elizabeth Hamilton and education; and Jane West, patriotism and sensibility. He has also written on James Boswell and William Hazlitt and worked extensively on the writings of Priscilla Wakefield. He co-ordinates (with Jeremy Davies) the Leeds Eighteenth-Century and Romantic Literature research seminar and last year organised a two-day conference on ‘Home and Nation: Reimagining the Domestic, 1750-1850′. His first monograph, Imagining Women Readers, 1789-1820: Well-Regulated Minds, which we discuss below, was published earlier this year by Manchester University Press.

1) How did you first become interested in the ways that female readers were imagined in the Romantic period?

Initially I was curious about the way that Romantic authors like Keats, Clare and Hazlitt seemed so dismissive – even fearful – of the prospect of women reading their work. In that …read more

Source:: http://www.bars.ac.uk/blog/?p=503

CfP: 23rd Annual Meeting of the British Women Writers Conference

By admin

BARS Members might be interested in submitting papers for the coming year’s British Women Writers Conference on the theme of Relations. The deadline’s coming up fast (January 5th), so if you’re keen, better get writing…

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23rd Annual Meeting of the British Women Writers Conference

June 25th-27th, 2015

Hosted by The Graduate Center of the City University of New York
at The Heyman Center, Columbia University

Relations

The British Women Writers Conference will engage the theme of “Relations” for its 23rd annual meeting to be held in New York City. The inspiration for this theme comes from Eve Kosofsky Sedgwick, who taught at the Graduate Center from 1998-2009, and whose investment in relations continues to inspire new ways of looking at the richness and variance of (dis)connection. One of her last courses, “Reading Relations,” explored literary constructions and alternative understandings of relationality (the syllabus for the course can be seen at http://evekosofskysedgwick.net/teaching/reading-relations.html). Sedgwick’s interdisciplinary approach informs our conference’s investments. In this spirit, we invite papers—as well as panel proposals—that focus on possible interpretations of and approaches to relationality across a broad spectrum of topics, methods, and disciplines. We would welcome investigations of interaction, exchange, correlation, …read more

Source:: http://www.bars.ac.uk/blog/?p=501

Quanta of unrest …

Picture

Why, when there’s more than enough food in the UK, were a million families forced to rely on food banks in 2014? Why, as agri-tech brings astonishing new capabilities online, from synthetic food and cisgenics, to agri-robots, could an all-party report conclude that “hunger now stalks the UK”? And why, in an age of technological convergence, are we as far from an equitable distribution of bio-resources than ever before? In a talk I’ll be giving on 29 December at the 31C3 congress in Hamburg, I’ll be exploring how art and literature can help us gain a deeper understanding of the mechanisms underlying this ethical and material dissonance.

My talk draws on the new book Jayne Archer, Howard “Sid” Thomas and I published earlier this month, Food and the Literary Imagination.

The book collects together much of the research into Keats and Shakespeare that garnered media attention in 2012 and 2013, along with new chapters on Chaucer and George Eliot. We also take a long look at the Field in Time, and end with some observations on future trends.


Picture
You can watch the talk live, and in hi-def, at …read more

Source:: http://www.richardmarggrafturley.com/blog/quanta-of-unrest

Quanta of unrest …

Picture

Why, when there’s more than enough food in the UK, were a million families forced to rely on food banks in 2014? Why, as agri-tech brings astonishing new capabilities online, from synthetic food and cisgenics, to agri-robots, could an all-party report conclude that “hunger now stalks the UK”? And why, in an age of technological convergence, are we as far from an equitable distribution of bio-resources than ever before? In a talk I’ll be giving on 29 December at the 31C3 congress in Hamburg, I’ll be exploring how art and literature can help us gain a deeper understanding of the mechanisms underlying this ethical and material dissonance.

My talk draws on the new book Jayne Archer, Howard “Sid” Thomas and I published earlier this month, Food and the Literary Imagination.

The book collects together much of the research into Keats and Shakespeare that garnered the attention of the world’s press in 2012 and 2014, along with new chapters on Chaucer and George Eliot. We also take a long look at the Field in Time, and end with some observations on future trends.


Picture

CFA: ‘Illustration and Gender’

By marylshannon

Dear Colleagues,

As you wrap up the end of your semester and look forward to the spring, I hope you will consider submitting an article to the Summer 2015 special issue of Nineteenth-Century Gender Studies on the topic of “Illustration and Gender.” We welcome articles of 5,000-8,000 words reflecting interdisciplinary approaches and international perspectives on illustration and gender studies. NCGS endorses a broad definition of gender studies, and we welcome submissions that consider nineteenth-century illustration and gender and sexuality in conjunction with race, class, place and nationality. The submission deadline for complete articles is March 15, 2015 (earlier submission is encouraged). We hope to address a variety of possible topics including but not limited to:

Studies of female illustrators of the nineteenth century

Critical histories of illustrators marked by gender and sexuality

Depictions of gender, race, sexuality, and/or class in illustrated literary works

Depictions of gender, race, sexuality, and/or class in illustrated advertisements

Illustration and gender in periodical publications

Illustration and gender in the novel

Illustration and gender in poetry

Illustration and gender in the fin-de-siècle

The influence of scientific theories and discoveries (phrenology, evolution, ethnography) on illustration and gender

Avenues opened up by the digital humanities for visualizing gender in nineteenth-century culture.

Please adhere to MLA style, using endnotes rather than …read more

Source:: https://romanticillustrationnetwork.wordpress.com/2014/12/20/cfa-illustration-and-gender/

CFA: ‘Illustration and Gender’

By marylshannon

Dear Colleagues,

As you wrap up the end of your semester and look forward to the spring, I hope you will consider submitting an article to the Summer 2015 special issue of Nineteenth-Century Gender Studies on the topic of “Illustration and Gender.” We welcome articles of 5,000-8,000 words reflecting interdisciplinary approaches and international perspectives on illustration and gender studies. NCGS endorses a broad definition of gender studies, and we welcome submissions that consider nineteenth-century illustration and gender and sexuality in conjunction with race, class, place and nationality. The submission deadline for complete articles is March 15, 2015 (earlier submission is encouraged). We hope to address a variety of possible topics including but not limited to:

Studies of female illustrators of the nineteenth century

Critical histories of illustrators marked by gender and sexuality

Depictions of gender, race, sexuality, and/or class in illustrated literary works

Depictions of gender, race, sexuality, and/or class in illustrated advertisements

Illustration and gender in periodical publications

Illustration and gender in the novel

Illustration and gender in poetry

Illustration and gender in the fin-de-siècle

The influence of scientific theories and discoveries (phrenology, evolution, ethnography) on illustration and gender

Avenues opened up by the digital humanities for visualizing gender in nineteenth-century culture.

Please adhere to MLA style, using endnotes rather than …read more

Source:: http://romanticillustrationnetwork.wordpress.com/2014/12/20/cfa-illustration-and-gender/

Lecture: Rosie Dias (Warwick), ‘From Counting House to Country House: Building the Image of the East India Company’

By marylshannon

The Birkbeck Eighteenth-Century Research Group is delighted to announce a lecture in the new year by Rosie Dias, Associate Professor in History of Art at the University of Warwick.

‘From Counting House to Country House: Building the Image of the East India Company’

6pm, Thursday 15th January
Room 407, 30 Russell Square

Rosie Dias’s research focuses on eighteenth and early nineteenth-century British art and visual culture. Her monograph, Exhibiting Englishness: John Boydell’s Shakespeare Gallery and the Formation of a National Aesthetic, was published by Yale University Press in 2013.

All very welcome! For further information, please contact Kate Retford: k.retford@bbk.ac.uk

best wishes,
Ann Lewis, Kate Retford, Luisa Cale and Emily Senior

…read more

Source:: https://romanticillustrationnetwork.wordpress.com/2014/12/18/lecture-rosie-dias-warwick-from-counting-house-to-country-house-building-the-image-of-the-east-india-company/

Lecture: Rosie Dias (Warwick), ‘From Counting House to Country House: Building the Image of the East India Company’

By marylshannon

The Birkbeck Eighteenth-Century Research Group is delighted to announce a lecture in the new year by Rosie Dias, Associate Professor in History of Art at the University of Warwick.

‘From Counting House to Country House: Building the Image of the East India Company’

6pm, Thursday 15th January
Room 407, 30 Russell Square

Rosie Dias’s research focuses on eighteenth and early nineteenth-century British art and visual culture. Her monograph, Exhibiting Englishness: John Boydell’s Shakespeare Gallery and the Formation of a National Aesthetic, was published by Yale University Press in 2013.

All very welcome! For further information, please contact Kate Retford: k.retford@bbk.ac.uk

best wishes,
Ann Lewis, Kate Retford, Luisa Cale and Emily Senior

…read more

Source:: http://romanticillustrationnetwork.wordpress.com/2014/12/18/lecture-rosie-dias-warwick-from-counting-house-to-country-house-building-the-image-of-the-east-india-company/

Publication Announcement – Past Issues of Blake/An Illustrated Quarterly

By Andrea H. Everett

Illustrated Quarterly

The William Blake Archive is pleased to announce a new wing of the Archive, which contains searchable HTML and PDF editions of thirty-nine past issues of Blake/An Illustrated Quarterly published from 2000 through 2009. These issues are accessible via the second entry on the home page, just below “Works in the Archive.” The PDF versions present the journal as originally published, but the HTML versions are re-implemented with many full-color images from the Blake Archive, making it possible for users to link directly to the Archive for those works that have been published in the Archive.

This publication is the first installment of the Archive’s ongoing project of making freely available and fully searchable over four decades of past issues of Blake/An Illustrated Quarterly, thus making public some of the most important scholarly work done in Blake studies over the past half-century. Issues published within five years of the current issue will remain available only to those who subscribe to the journal.

As always, the William Blake Archive is a free site, imposing no access restrictions and charging no subscription fees. The site is made possible by the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill with …read more

Source:: https://blakearchive.wordpress.com/2014/12/16/publication-announcement-past-issues-of-blakean-illustrated-quarterly/