BARS Exchange

BARS Exchange

Aggregated blogs on Romantic Studies – please click through to read full posts.

Archive for January 2015

Book History and Bibliography Research Seminar

By admin

The current season of the Book History and Bibliography Research Seminar at the Institute of English Studies, ‘Paper Pen and Ink 2: Manuscript Cultures in the Age of Print’, includes a number of sessions that may be of interest to Romanticists. The next is Wim van Mierlo (Acting Director, Institute of English Studies, University of London) on manuscript culture after 1700; this will take place at 5:30pm next Monday (February 2nd).

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Source:: http://www.bars.ac.uk/blog/?p=555

Four Zoas: Whiteboard Edition

By Eric Loy

Behold, a masterpiece of the dry erase medium:

So what we have here is a drawn mockup of where our Four Zoas prototype is headed. It’s a layered transcription display that will expand lines on mouse click to simulate the manuscript’s textual composition. Much more on that later.

For now, a couple thoughts on this pretty shoddy drawing that is currently taking up space in the Digital Humanities Center of Rush Rhees.

First, when working collaboratively, communication is key. The point of this whiteboard drawing was to help our library’s resident programmer, Josh Romphf, see what our XML markup was aiming it for the eventual transformation that he would be building. Hey, it worked.

Second, as more and more scholars and students add “DH” to their list of interests, it’s crucial to learn the language of the labor involved. Some DH-ers will also be expert programmers; most will never be. That’s ok. However, maintaining a working knowledge of the technology your humanistic research might encounter is the key to working effectively with programmers, “technical editors,” etc. Not only will one be able to articulate a project’s needs more clearly, research planners can better anticipate these needs and proactively shape a project accordingly.

In other words, …read more

Source:: https://blakearchive.wordpress.com/2015/01/28/four-zoas-whiteboard-edition/

John Clennell and the Literary and Philosophical Society at Newcastle-upon-Tyne

By networksofimprovement

There is a Library Day at the Literary and Philosophical Society of Newcastle-upon-Tyne on February 18. Anyone interested in giving a short paper (10 mins) on the Society or research using its resources should contact me at (jon.mee@york.ac.uk) or Ruth Connolly (ruth.connolly@newcastle.ac.uk)

I’m planning to talk about John Clennell. Lit Phil missionary to Perth (see Cassie’s post above) and then Hackney, where he set one up. Women seem to have been much more involved at Hackney than in Newcastle. Paul Gaulinius – current President at Newcastle – generously informs me that the recommendation book shows Clennell wanted more involvement for women at Newcastle. I’m waiting for the chance to see what he says next time I go up (archive fever)

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Source:: https://networksofimprovement.wordpress.com/2015/01/28/john-clennell-and-the-literary-and-philosophical-society-at-newcastle-upon-tyne/

CfP: The Romantic Eye (Yale, 17-18 April 2015)

By marylshannon

Yale-Conference-300x222

Please see below for a Call for Papers for an exciting-sounding symposium on the Romantic Eye at Yale this April. The organisers are particularly keen to secure contributions from early career scholars (including people working on their doctorates). Flights and accommodation will be provided for those invited to speak, so if you’re working on a topic in this area, this could be a really great opportunity.

(Taken from the BARS blog)

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The Romantic Eye, 1760–1860 and Beyond
April 17, 2015-April 18, 2015
Yale University

This symposium examines Romanticism as a shape-shifting cultural phenomenon that resists easy categorization. Focusing on the period from 1760 to 1860, the symposium embraces the amorphousness that has been ascribed to Romanticism historically by eschewing any limiting definition of it, seeking instead to explore the broad range of art and visual culture characterized as “Romantic” during this hundred-year span. We are interested in what the Romantic “eye” pursued and perceived, and how it set itself the task of recording those perceptions. In addition to interrogations of the relationship between the visual arts and Romanticism, we welcome papers on writers, composers, scientists, and philosophers whose projects engaged the …read more

Source:: https://romanticillustrationnetwork.wordpress.com/2015/01/27/cfp-the-romantic-eye-yale-17-18-april-2015/

CALL FOR PAPERS – ‘Scandal and sociability: New perspectives on the Burney family, 1750-1850′

By sophiecoulombeau CALL FOR PAPERS Scandal and sociability New perspectives on the Burney family, 1750-1850 One-day interdisciplinary symposium Cardiff University Tuesday 1 September 2015 Keynote speaker: Professor Peter Sabor, McGill University ‘‘The march of intimacy’: Dr. Burney and Dr. Johnson’ In recent years, much scholarly interest has moved beyond the novels of Frances […] …read more

Source:: https://crecs.wordpress.com/2015/01/26/call-for-papers-scandal-and-sociability-new-perspectives-on-the-burney-family-1750-1850/

Romantic Imprints Website

By admin

Very pleased to announce that the website for Romantic Imprints, BARS’ 2015 International Conference, is now live. Of particular interest will be the page on panels, which contains a list of the open call sessions (with a document giving fuller details) and gives information on a number of themed panels which will take place at the conference. Abstracts are due on February 14th and should be submitted to BARS2015@cardiff.ac.uk. I’d just like to flag up that I’m looking for participants for a Digital Communications roundtable (one of the open call sessions) – this won’t involve full papers, but rather short (5 minute) introductions to panelist’s digital work, followed by wide-ranging discussion. If you’d be interested in taking part in this, please submit a short (150-200 word proposal) to the conference email address – fuller details are on the document linked above.

You can also receive updates on the conference via Twitter and Facebook.

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Source:: http://www.bars.ac.uk/blog/?p=552

Third RIN Symposium ‘The Literary Galleries’: REGISTRATION OPEN

By marylshannon

Romantic Illustration Network Symposium
The Literary Galleries: Entrepreneurship and Public Art’
Supported by the University of Roehampton, the Bibliographical Society, and Tate Britain

We are pleased to announce that the third RIN symposium is now OPEN for REGISTRATION.

Friday 27th February 2015, 10am – 5pm
Board Room and Duffield Room, Tate Britain,
Millbank, London SW1P 4RG

This symposium brings together the authors of the key scholarship on the literary galleries of the Romantic period: Fred Burwick (The Boydell Shakespeare Gallery, 1996), Rosie Dias (Exhibiting Englishness, 2013), Ian Haywood (Romantic Caricature, 2013), Luisa Cale (‘Blake and the Literary Galleries’, 2008; Fuseli’s Milton Gallery 2006) and Martin Myrone (Gothic Nightmares, 2006; John Martin: Apocalypse, 2011) in a venue that is itself a form of literary gallery (Tate Britain) to present new research and to debate the relationship of painting to illustration, text, and print. To what extent did the literary galleries change the role of illustration in the Romantic period?

Registration:

Places are FREE but limited to 15 in total, excluding speakers and organisers. This is due to restricted access to the Print Room. To secure your place, please email Mary.Shannon@roehampton.ac.uk, providing your name, status/job title, and institution (for name badges). Places will be awarded on a …read more

Source:: https://romanticillustrationnetwork.wordpress.com/2015/01/23/third-rin-symposium-the-literary-galleries-registration-open/

Victorian Legacies: The French Revolution’s Reign of Gothic Terror

By erbutcher@googlemail.com by Matthew Crofts, PhD Candidate at the University of Hull. There are quarrels in which even Satan, bringing help, were not unwelcome; even Satan, fighting stiffly, might cover himself with glory, – of a temporary sort. – Thomas Carlyle, The French Revolution: A History, 1837 p. 87 The French Revolution had an incalculable effect during the […] …read more

Source:: http://www.romtext.org.uk/victorian-legacies-the-french-revolutions-reign-of-gothic-terror/