BARS Exchange

BARS Exchange

Aggregated blogs on Romantic Studies – please click through to read full posts.

Archive for March 2015

The Visual and the Verbal’, a skills-based training event for postgraduate students using material held at the Ruskin Library, Lancaster University on Wednesday 20th May.

By marylshannon

The Visual and the Verbal’, a skills-based training event for postgraduate students using material held at the Ruskin Library, Lancaster University on Wednesday 20th May.

http://www.lancaster.ac.uk/fass/english/events/visual-verbal.htm

The Ruskin Library holds the largest collection of material relating to the life and work of John Ruskin (1819-1900), one of the most important cultural figures of his era in the English-speaking world. Among the most important manuscripts in the collection are 29 diary notebooks, covering the period 1835 to 1888, and c. 4000 manuscript letters. Also in the Library are over 1000 drawings by Ruskin, with others by his associates and pupils, and 125 plates from his collection of daguerreotypes, one of the most important collections of early photographs in the world dating from 1845-1858. The strength of the archive lies in its breadth and depth, enabling research in a number of disciplines, and it will be used at our event to teach the research skills required for work with both manuscript and visual materials. Students working in English, History, Museum Studies, Visual Arts, Art History are welcome to apply for this event.

The event will feature a combination of teaching methods, including intensive, practical hands-on sessions with Ruskin’s manuscripts. The event is …read more

Source:: https://romanticillustrationnetwork.wordpress.com/2015/03/18/%EF%BB%BF%EF%BB%BFthe-visual-and-the-verbal-a-skills-based-training-event-for-postgraduate-students-using-material-held-at-the-ruskin-library-lancaster-university-on-wednesday-20th-may/

The Rise and Fall of the Silver Fork Novel

By erbutcher@googlemail.com Erin Johnson is in the third year of her DPhil in English at the University of Oxford. Her thesis examines representations of masculinity in the Brontës’ early writing and mature work. She’s also submitting BELLADONNA, a YA historical fantasy novel, to literary agents while drafting a new YA historical. Have you ever found yourself wondering why […] …read more

Source:: http://www.romtext.org.uk/the-rise-and-fall-of-the-silver-fork-novel/

Five Questions: Alison Lumsden on the Edinburgh Edition of Walter Scott’s Poetry

By admin

NPG D16117; Sir Walter Scott, 1st Bt by Charles Picart, published by  T. Cadell & W. Davies, after  William Evans, after  Sir Henry Raeburn

Walter Scott, by Charles Picart, published by T. Cadell & W. Davies, after William Evans, after Sir Henry Raeburn; stipple engraving, published 21 December 1811; NPG D16117; used under a Creative Commons licence (CC-BY-NC-ND)

Alison Lumsden holds a Chair in English at the University of Aberdeen. She has published widely on authors including Lewis Grassic Gibbon, Robert Louis Stevenson, Alasdair Gray, Nan Shepherd, Jackie Kay, and Robert Burns, but Walter Scott is the writer who lies at the heart of her research. Her monograph Walter Scott and the Limits of Language was published by Edinburgh University Press in 2010 and she has edited or co-edited five volumes of the Edinburgh Edition of the Waverley Novels (EEWN): The Pirate; The Heart of Mid-Lothian; Reliquiae Trotcosienses: or The Gabions of the Late Jonathan Oldbuck Esq. of Monkbarns; Peveril of the Peak and Woodstock. She is currently building on this research through her role as Series Editor for the new Edinburgh Edition of Walter Scott’s Poetry, which we discuss below.

1) How did you first become interested in Walter …read more

Source:: http://www.bars.ac.uk/blog/?p=604

Five Questions: Ted Underwood on Why Literary Periods Mattered

By admin

Ted Underwood - Why Literary Periods Mattered

Ted Underwood is a Professor and the LAS Centennial Scholar of English at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. His graduate work was in the field of Romanticism and led, among other places, to his first monograph, The Work of the Sun: Literature, Science, and Political Economy, 1760-1860. His current research explores the possibilities opened up by digital technologies for working on large collections of texts written over considerable periods of time; some of his recent progress in this area is detailed in his interim report Understanding Genre in a Collection of a Million Volumes. Below, we discuss his fascinating book Why Literary Periods Mattered, first published by Stanford University Press in 2013 and now available in paperback. Ted blogs at The Stone and the Shell and can be found on Twitter @Ted_Underwood.

1) How did you first become interested in the importance of periodisation to the identity of …read more

Source:: http://www.bars.ac.uk/blog/?p=598

Next event—How to Keep Your (Georgian) Man, 17 Mar 2015

By Anthony Mandal Our next CRECS event turns to the eternal question of sexuality, gender and domesticity in the eighteenth century. Christian Grey may be the man of the moment (unfortunately), but the Georgians had their own—characteristic, shall we say?—view of romance and sex, which might raise a few eyebrows even today. The literature, drama and art of […] …read more

Source:: https://crecs.wordpress.com/2015/03/15/how-to-keep-your-georgian-man/

LONG POST: Teaching P B Shelley

By annamercer90

PeterlooMassacre

This blog was originally published as part of the ‘Teaching Romanticism’ series on Romantic Textualities:

http://www.romtext.org.uk/teaching-romanticism-xi-percy-bysshe-shelley/

Teaching Percy Bysshe Shelley, by Anna Mercer (University of York)

I will be teaching undergraduates for the first time in Spring 2015. One anxiety I have is that new readers may come to the works of the ‘big’ Romantic poets with presumptions about their iconic status and therefore their work. Shelley has had perhaps one of the most unsettled critical histories of any Romantic figure: Matthew Arnold infamously branded him an ‘ineffectual angel’ in 1881, and although this misrepresentation has gradually and persistently been disproved in scholarship, the Romantics as a group of aristocratic, white, male, imaginative authors (of course, they all are not always these things, but Shelley is), writing 200 years ago, can sorely influence a new reader’s judgement of them. Surely it is important to establish that Shelley was actually philosophical, radical and political, as well as capable of writing beautiful verse effusions.

One of the critical minds responsible for establishing Shelley’s power was Kenneth Neill Cameron, who in 1942 wrote that ‘the key to the understanding of the poetry, in fact, is to be found in the prose’. More recent Shelley scholarship …read more

Source:: https://percyandmaryshelley.wordpress.com/2015/03/13/long-post-teaching-p-b-shelley/

Conference excursion confirmed: Tintern Abbey

By Anthony Mandal We’re delighted to be in a position to confirm fuller details of the conference excursion, which will be taking place at Tintern Abbey. Sitting in the border county of Monmouthshire, the Abbey was founded in village of Tintern during the 12th century by the Lord of Chepstow, Walter de Clare. A busy Cistercian religious institution enjoyed […] …read more

Source:: http://bars2015.org/2015/03/12/conference-excursion-confirmed-tintern-abbey/

Teaching Romanticism XI: Percy Bysshe Shelley

By danielcook by Daniel Cook As part of this ongoing series on Teaching Romanticism we will consider the ways in which we lecture on and discuss individual authors, whether during author-specific modules or broader period surveys. I thought it would be particularly useful to hear about which texts educators use and in what context, whether they place […] …read more

Source:: http://www.romtext.org.uk/teaching-romanticism-xi-percy-bysshe-shelley/