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BARS Exchange

Aggregated blogs on Romantic Studies – please click through to read full posts.

Archive for January 2016

The Great Lady’s Magazine Stitch Off goes to Chawton House Library

By ladys-magazine

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If you have been following the project Twitter feed (@ladysmagproject) or recently set-up Facebook page you’ll have seen some of the recent updates we’ve been getting from project followers about their progress in the Lady’s Magazine Stitch Off.

© Sue Jones (2016).

We were absolutely delighted a little over a week ago to receive images of this beautiful worked up sprig detail from one of our patterns from Sue Jones. Sue (whose blogs over at Tortoise Loft ) completed this delicate shadow work in filament silk (from Devere Yarns) on some silk habotai fabric. The colours and delicate finish really bring this pattern to life and have been much admired by the project’s followers.

Sue learned of the Stitch Off from Rachel Wright of Virtuosew Adventures, which has to be one of my favourite blog titles ever. Rachel has also embarked on her Stitch Off project in the past week: a caramel-coloured pashmina. Rachel has written a really interesting post on her blog about her first experiments on this unamenable fabric, which we hope you’ll all pop over and visit here. It’s a shame she is going to …read more

Source:: http://blogs.kent.ac.uk/ladys-magazine/2016/01/31/the-great-ladys-magazine-stitch-off-goes-to-chawton-house-library/

Leverhulme Lecture by Tim Stretton, ‘Stepmothers at Law in the Long Eighteenth Century’

By sophiecoulombeau ‘Stepmothers at Law in the Long Eighteenth Century’ Tim Stretton, Saint Mary’s University, Nova Scotia Leverhulme Trust Visiting Professor, Cardiff University A Leverhulme Lecture supported by the Cardiff Romanticism and Eighteenth-Century Seminar (CRECS) and the School of History, Archeology and Religion (SHARE) Monday 29 February 2016, 5.15pm Room 2.01, John Percival Building, Cardiff […] …read more

Source:: https://crecs.wordpress.com/2016/01/31/leverhulme-lecture-by-tim-stretton-stepmothers-at-law-in-the-long-eighteenth-century/

Hidden Behind a Screen

By Rachael Isom

Mrs. Blake

During the past few months I have been one of several project assistants processing images for the online archive of Blake: An Illustrated Quarterly. Every now and then, hidden amongst the articles, minute particulars, and book reviews, I’ll stumble across a creative piece. Last week, while working on an issue from 1991, a poem caught my eye, but it wasn’t a poem by Blake; it was a poem about the Blakes, written by American poet Paulette Roeske. It’s called “Mrs. Blake Requests Her Portrait.”

William Blake, Catherine Blake c. 1805 (recto), graphite on paper, Tate Gallery N05188.

He keeps putting her off.
She, in her quiet way, insists.
Knowing he has a way with women,
romancing them in paint
the color of jewels, inventing
their most flattering features,
she expects he will exalt
her wifely figure,
the serviceable hips,
hair ripe with oil and smoke.
Over lunch he takes up
a dull lead stub and sketches
her profile: one miniature eye
downcast, half a mouth
and chin. Still chewing
the last bite of fish pie,
he adds a few squiggles for hair.
Pushing it across the table,
he trusts her to understand
that when he rendered Beatrice
crowned, Eve‘s exquisite neck
and Bathsheba disrobed,
his vision was of Catherine.<a target="_blank" …read more

Source:: https://blakearchive.wordpress.com/2016/01/28/hidden-behind-a-screen/

Teaching Romanticism XIV: Shakespearean Legacies

By danielcook by Daniel Cook with Jeffrey Kahan As part of this ongoing series on Teaching Romanticism we will consider the ways in which we lecture on and discuss individual authors, whether during author-specific modules or broader period surveys. I thought it would be particularly useful to hear about which texts educators use and in what […] …read more

Source:: http://www.romtext.org.uk/teaching-romanticism-xiv-shakespearean-legacies/

Blake Quarterly winter issue

By Sarah Jones

Our winter issue (vol. 49, no. 3) has just been published. It contains:

  • Joseph Fletcher, “Ocean Growing: Blake’s Two Versions of Newton and the Emerging Polypus”
  • Sibylle Erle, review of Colin Trodd, Visions of Blake: William Blake in the Art World 1830-1930
  • Robert N. Essick and Jenijoy La Belle, “The Blakes at Their Press”
  • Angus Whitehead, “‘a bite‘: The First Published Reference to Blake’s Ghost of a Flea?”
  • G. E. Bentley, Jr., “W. S. Blake: New Facts and Engravings”

Access to the contents is by subscription, either individually or through an institution. Several years’ worth of back issues (spring 1990 to spring 2011) are freely available, however, at …read more

Source:: https://blakearchive.wordpress.com/2016/01/21/blake-quarterly-winter-issue/

Authorship Studies Now and in the Pre-Digital Age; or, A Tribute to the Old School

By knlc

LM iv March 1773

As Jennie reminded us earlier this month, we have recently entered the last quarter of the term allotted to our research project. Most of my time currently goes to the attribution of the countless anonymous, initialled and pseudonymous items in the Lady’s Magazine, and the ascription of appropriated content. The overwhelming majority of the over 14000 indexed items were published without a (complete) legal name for their authors, and every day I discover more contributions presented as original work that are in fact tacit appropriations from other periodicals, or extracts from books. To make sure that I do not miss too many of the latter I merge my mind fully with my computer, like some bookish Keanu Reeves, and check each item by means of a hypnotic but productive procedure. A while ago it struck me how different my daily routine must be from that of scholars employed on exactly the same task not twenty years ago. So, where do the differences lie?

LM IV (March 1773). Image © Adam Matthew Digital / British Library. Not to be reproduced without permission.

I usually work as follows. I consult the Lady’s …read more

Source:: http://blogs.kent.ac.uk/ladys-magazine/2016/01/21/authorship-studies-now-and-in-the-pre-digital-age-or-a-tribute-to-the-old-school/

Birkbeck 19th C Forum: Tuesday 26 January, ‘Julia Margaret Cameron: New Discoveries’ with Marta Weiss and Colin Ford

By marylshannon

Birkbeck Forum for Nineteenth-Century Studies
Spring 2016 Programme

The first event of the spring term for the Birkbeck Forum for Nineteenth-Century Studies will feature Marta Weiss (Victoria & Albert Museum) presenting on ‘Julia Margaret Cameron: New Discoveries’ with Colin Ford (Former head of the National Museum of Photography, Film and Television) responding. This event is presented in collaboration with the History and Theory of Photography Research Centre at Birkbeck, and will take place Tuesday 26 January 2016 from 6.00pm to 8.00pm in the Keynes Library, 43 Gordon Square, London, WC1H 0PD.

This seminar will explore the new material Martha Weiss discovered while researching the current must-see exhibition at the Victoria and Albert Museum, marking the bicentenary of the birth of Julia Margaret Cameron, 150 years after she first exhibited her work there. Colin Ford has worked extensively on this important photographer, most notably in the comprehensive catalogue Julia Margaret Cameron: Complete Photos (Getty, 2002).

The session is free and all are welcome, but since the venue has limited space it will be first come, first seated.

For further information on the exhibition, see: http://www.vam.ac.uk/content/exhibitions/julia-margaret-cameron/about-the-exhibition/

Download Julia Margaret Cameron: Complete Photos (Getty, 2002) here: http://www.getty.edu/publications/virtuallibrary/0892366818.html

For further information on the History and Theory of …read more

Source:: https://romanticillustrationnetwork.wordpress.com/2016/01/20/birkbeck-19th-c-forum-tuesday-26-january-julia-margaret-cameron-new-discoveries-with-marta-weiss-and-colin-ford/

The Great Lady’s Magazine Stitch Off: Update #1

By ladys-magazine

Larkin Stitch Off

Now we are comfortably into the new year, we thought it was high time that we gave a brief update on the Great Lady’s Magazine Stitch Off. For the uninitiated, where have you been? But if you have managed not to hear us shout about what we’re doing on social media, I should explain that we have made available a number of embroidery patterns from a bound copy of the magazine from 1796 that I recently acquired in the hopes that some of you (lots of you!) might try to make them up and tell or show us what you enjoyed and learned in the process. Photos of the patterns (along with their measurements) can be found here.

The first thing to say is thank you! Thank you for your interest, your enthusiasm and your expertise. Lots of people have sent us emails and tweets about wanting to take part in the Stitch Off and what you might do for it, although we know that many of you have other projects you need to finish up first. That fact, along with the holiday season and all the busy-ness that entails, has led some of you to ask us …read more

Source:: http://blogs.kent.ac.uk/ladys-magazine/2016/01/17/the-great-ladys-magazine-stitch-off-update-1/

Audio Recordings of Keynote Lectures from ‘The Arts and Feeling in Nineteenth-Century Literature and Culture’

By marylshannon

From the Birkbeck 19th C Forum website:

‘We are pleased to announce that audio recordings of Keynote Lectures are now available for ‘The Arts and Feeling in Nineteenth-Century Literature and Culture’, a major international conference which took place at Birkbeck, University of London, 16-18 July 2015.

The conference explored the ways in which nineteenth-century authors, artists, sculptors and musicians imagined and represented emotion and how writers and critics conceptualised the emotional aspects of aesthetic response. It aimed to map the state of the field in this growing area of interest for nineteenth-century scholars by locating recent interdisciplinary work on sentimentality and art and writing and the senses within wider debates about the relationship between psychology and aesthetics in the long-nineteenth century.

Speakers investigated the physiology and psychology of aesthetic perception and the mind/body interactions at play in the experience of a wide range of arts. Key questions included: How did Victorian artists represent feeling and how were these feelings aestheticised? What rhetorical strategies did Victorian writers use to figure aesthetic response? What expressive codes and conventions were familiar to the Victorians? Which nineteenth-century scientific developments affected artistic production and what impact did these have on affective reactions?’

To access the recordings …read more

Source:: https://romanticillustrationnetwork.wordpress.com/2016/01/14/audio-recordings-of-keynote-lectures-from-the-arts-and-feeling-in-nineteenth-century-literature-and-culture/

The No Longer Anonymous ‘Memoirs of a Young Lady’

By jd359

Screen Shot 2016-01-14 at 12.47.37

The serial fiction in the Lady’s Magazine (1770-1848) is often novel-length, anonymous and absorbing. I began writing this blog about one of the serials that I found particularly engrossing, Memoirs of a Young Lady, intending to point out its originality and praise its writing style and plot. But (perhaps inevitably) as I began researching the serial for the blog in an attempt to uncover any information beyond its publication dates in the magazine, I made a very interesting discovery.

Published from April 1783 through November 1786, the serial entertained readers for over 3.5 years. The anonymous novel, never signed in any of its over 40 installments, has – like most of the fiction in the periodical – remained largely unknown and unstudied.

The novel follows the heroine, Lucretia Bertie, as she navigates her way through the constant persecutions of the primary villain, lord Belton, and his wife, her former friend Sophia. Sophia’s jealousy of Lucretia, inflamed by her husband’s infatuation with the heroine, drives her to devise increasingly vicious plots against her. One of these plots involves hiring her former footman, William, to attempt to force Lucretia into a marriage with him. The footman, posing as a wealthy gentleman, attempts (and fails) …read more

Source:: http://blogs.kent.ac.uk/ladys-magazine/2016/01/14/the-no-longer-anonymous-memoirs-of-a-young-lady/