BARS Exchange

BARS Exchange

Aggregated blogs on Romantic Studies – please click through to read full posts.

Archive for February 2017

Summer Workshops

By dustinfrazierwood

Dr Elizabeth Savage, RIN fellow-traveller and Lecturer in Book History at the Institute of English Studies, University of London, will convene two workshops in summer 2017 that may be of interest to RIN members. Full details of each course, including how to apply, are on the following pages:

‘The History of Printed Book Illustration’, Bodleian Libraries Centre for the Study of the Book, 26-30 June

The course is for those who work with early books as in any academic or professional capacity. In addition to seminars and examination of items from Bodleian collections, students will be instructed in the practical processes used to illustrate early printed books, in the Bodleian’s hand-press printing workshop. Practical printing instruction will be supervised by Richard Lawrence.

‘History of Colour Printing’, London Rare Books School, 10-14 July

This interdisciplinary, introductory course provides an overview of colour printing techniques in the West from manual techniques c.1400 through the development of chromolithography in the mid-1800s. Discussions will be based on the close analysis of many kinds of content, including text, images, music, diagrams, maps, scientific tools and mathematical figures. By discussing colour-specific issues in the design, production and use of printed material across diverse kinds of content, …read more

Source:: https://romanticillustrationnetwork.wordpress.com/2017/02/22/summer-workshops/

Event: Female Networks – British Women Artists 1750-1950 Postgraduate / Early Career Study Day

By dustinfrazierwood

The Victorianist: BAVS Postgraduates

British Women Artists 1750-1950
Post-graduate/Early Career Study Day

—-Female Networks—-

University of Glasgow & Glasgow School of Art

screen-shot-2017-02-16-at-11-05-33

Thursday, 29 June 2017

British Women Artists 1750-1950, a Sub-Group of Tate’s British Art Network was founded in 2015 to provide opportunities for knowledge exchange between University-based scholars and museum/gallery-based curators/researchers and stimulate new thinking and exhibition projects around women’s art works. On 30th June 2017, the University of Glasgow and Glasgow School of Art will jointly host the Fifth Meeting of the Sub-Group on the theme of ‘Female Networks’, especially the kind of informal networks through which women furthered their study and practice as artists, designers and craft workers.

To mark the occasion, a postgraduate/early career study day is planned to take place on Thursday, 29th June to encourage reflection upon this rich topic in new and diverse ways. Questions might include: Why did women find networking necessary/desirable…

…read more

Source:: https://romanticillustrationnetwork.wordpress.com/2017/02/22/event-female-networks-british-women-artists-1750-1950-postgraduate-early-career-study-day/

BARS Postgraduate Representative – Applications Open Now

By Anna Mercer

Please see below for a call for expressions of interest in the role of postgraduate representative on the BARS Executive.

Supporting postgraduate and early career researchers has always been an important part of the remit of the British Association for Romantic Studies, and we are currently looking for a postgraduate student to come on board to represent our postgraduate members and students in the field more generally.

The postgraduate representative serves for a term of two years (renewable according to the status of their studies), during which they will attend four executive meetings and will have the opportunity to co-organise special postgraduate events at the BARS international conferences. They will also work with the current postgraduate representative, Honor Rieley, to organise the next biennial postgraduate and early career conference, which will be held in 2018.

The position offers valuable experience in conference organisation, together with excellent networking opportunities. Most importantly, it offers the chance to help shape and support the postgraduate community within Romantic studies. The post is unpaid, although travel expenses are met by the Association.

Eligibility: We are especially keen to receive applications from students who expect to have postgraduate status until the summer of 2019. The new representative will officially stand …read more

Source:: http://www.bars.ac.uk/blog/?p=1568

Ian Newman on Taverns as Institutions

By msangster

(Our first contribution looking forward to the ‘Institutions as Curators’ workshop is from Ian Newman of the University of Notre Dame, to whom we’re very grateful for these wide-ranging reflections on taverns as literary institutions.)

Samuel Johnson’s Club, founded at the Turk’s Head Tavern in Gerrard Street in 1764, was frequently referred to by its members the “literary club.” As Charles Burney explained, it was Johnson’s wish that the Club “should be composed of the heads of every liberal and literary profession that we might not talk nonsense on any subject that might be started, but have somebody to refer to in our doubts and discussions, by whose Science we might be enlightened.”[1] Exactly what Burney meant by “liberal and literary professions” or indeed “Science” isn’t entirely clear, but given the presence in the Club of musicians like Burney himself, artists like Joshua Reynolds, actors like David Garrick, and aesthetic theorists and politicians like Edmund Burke, it is evident that the lines between disciplines were far less anxiously patrolled than they would become later, and “literariness” was a helpfully capacious quality which might encompass every possible subject.

The breadth of what “literature” could mean in the eighteenth …read more

Source:: http://institutionsofliterature.net/2017/02/20/ian-newman-on-taverns-as-institutions/

Moving Forward…

By msangster

We’re now fairly well advanced with programming the first two Institutions of Literature workshops, and will be releasing the full programme for the Glasgow event, ‘Institutions as Curators’, in the next few days. We’ll also be publishing a series of reflections from participants in the weeks running up to the workshop to get our discussions underway. We’re keen to include contributions from anyone who’s interested in the network; if you’d like to get in touch, please email institutionsofliterature@gmail.com.

…read more

Source:: http://institutionsofliterature.net/2017/02/20/moving-forward/

Gender and Image Workshop

By dustinfrazierwood

The Women’s Studies Group 1558-1837 will host its 2017 workshop on 6 May, on the theme ‘The Fruitful Body: Gender and Image’.

Attendees are welcome from any discipline and period covered by the group. Each attendee is asked to bring a 5-minute presentation on some topic exploring the workshop theme. Suggested topics include (but aren’t limited to): caricature, texts, novels, conduct manuals, medicine, philosophy, motherhood and women artists.

In addition to presentations and discussion, there will be a keynote address by Karen Hearn (UCL) on ‘Women, agency and fertility in early modern British portraits’.

Full details, including registration information, are available on the …read more

Source:: https://romanticillustrationnetwork.wordpress.com/2017/02/15/gender-and-image-workshop/

Call for Papers. William Godwin: Forms, Fears, Futures. 24 June 2017

By Anna Mercer

Please see the CfP below for the conference ‘William Godwin: Forms, Fears, Futures’ to be held at Newcastle University on 24 June 2o17. The deadline for abstracts is 15 March 2017.

William Godwin: Forms, Fears, Futures

24 June 2017

Newcastle University

Confirmed plenary speakers: Professor Mark Philp (Warwick) and Dr David O’Shaughnessy (Trinity College Dublin)

Registration fee: £20 (waived for Newcastle staff and students)

Postgraduate bursaries available

Abstracts are invited for a one-day conference and debate on the work of William Godwin, to be hosted by Newcastle University on 24 June 2017.

We aim to foster a spirit of lively discussion and structured debate and to explore the full range of Godwin’s thought, writing, and influence. Abstracts are sought for twenty-minute papers which respond to one of the three panels: Forms, Fears, and Futures.

William Godwin is perhaps today best-known for his 1793 political treatise Enquiry Concerning Political Justice and its Influence on Morals and Happiness, and for the novel which explored the ideas developed in Political Justice, Things as They Are; or, The Adventures of Caleb Williams (1794). As a Romantic-period author and figure, however, he is often subsumed within his family circle and the drama of their overlapped personal lives and works.

This event aims instead to …read more

Source:: http://www.bars.ac.uk/blog/?p=1565

Book Announcement: Coleridge and Contemplation

By Matthew Sangster

Congratulations to Peter Cheyne and his contributors on the forthcoming Coleridge and Contemplation collection, which Peter describes below. BARS helped to support a workshop that was part of the book’s development process.


Book announcement: Peter Cheyne (ed.), Coleridge and Contemplation, OUP, 2017

A collection of essays on Coleridge’s contemplative philosophy written by philosophers, intellectual historians, and leading literary authorities on Coleridge.

The editor and authors of Coleridge and Contemplation would like to thank BARS for a grant that assisted a workshop at the University of Cambridge English Faculty, 10–11 August, 2015. The workshop enabled contributing authors of Coleridge and Contemplation to present their research so that internal connections within the overall work could be better understood and developed.

Sarah Hutton, Graham Davidson, and Matthew Gibson were present as auditors, providing the authors with keen interrogations and constructive criticism. Further reviews of papers as they developed into book chapters were provided by romanticists Anthony J. Harding and Alan P. R. Gregory, philosopher Stephen Priest, and the two anonymous Coleridge scholars arranged by OUP.

The book is now available for order, and Oxford University Press have provided a 30% discount code, AAFLY6G, which can be used at the OUP webpage for the book. …read more

Source:: http://www.bars.ac.uk/blog/?p=1561

Picturing the News

By dustinfrazierwood

February 5th marked the launch of the online exhibition, ‘Picturing the News: The Art of Victorian Graphic Journalism’, co-curated by Professor Cathy Waters and Dr Ruth Brimacombe and funded by the AHRC.

The resource examines the work of Special Correspondents William Howard Russel (The Times), George Augustus Sala (Daily Telegraph and Illustrated London News), and Archibald Forbes (Daily News), and the Special Artists William Simpson (Illustrated London News), Sydney Prior Hall (The Graphic) and Melton Prior (Illustrated London News). In addition to biographical information on these writers and artists, the exhibition examines their artistic practice, the techniques they used, and their influence on contemporary journalism and the ways that readers perceived foreign events.

‘Picturing the News’ also provides a range of examples of the artists’ work embedded within individual essays (which function as clear and well-developed interpretation panels for the various virtual ‘rooms’ or ‘areas’ of the exhibition), which can be expanded and examined in high resolution versions.

…read more

Source:: https://romanticillustrationnetwork.wordpress.com/2017/02/07/picturing-the-news/

Wordsworth in Leeds by Anna Fleming

By Anna Mercer

1 Jeff talk
The post below, originally published on the Wordsworth Trust Blog, describes Anna Fleming’s experiences as a doctoral student at the University of Leeds and the Wordsworth Trust. It follows on from a previous post about her year in Grasmere. Here she discusses her public engagement work in Leeds.
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After my blog post reporting my year in Grasmere I return to share my year in Leeds. I am a collaborative doctoral award student which means I am partnered with two institutions: the University of Leeds and the Wordsworth Trust. Unlike 2015, when I was based in Grasmere and I used the archive, did community outreach and museum visitor services, my time in Leeds has been much more oriented towards finishing my thesis. Yet following on from the success of the public engagement project I delivered in Grasmere – where I read Wordsworth’s poetry with a number of different people to assess local attitudes and responses to the poet and his poetry – I decided to set up a similar project in Leeds.

From September to December I worked with two groups: primary school children from Shire Oak School in Headingley and older people from Caring Together in Woodhouse. Despite …read more

Source:: http://www.bars.ac.uk/blog/?p=1554