BARS Exchange

BARS Exchange

Aggregated blogs on Romantic Studies – please click through to read full posts.

Archive for April 2017

‘Picturing Places’ at the British Library

By dustinfrazierwood

Rotunda
The British Library is delighted to announce the launch of Picturing Places, a new free online resource which explores the Library’s extensive holdings of landscape imagery.

Robert Mitchell, Cross-section of The Rotunda, Leicester Square, built to exhibit panoramas (1801). BL 56.i.12 (Plate 14).

The British Library’s huge collection of historic prints and drawings is a treasure trove waiting to be discovered. Picturing Places showcases works of art by well-known artists such as Thomas Gainsborough and J. M. W. Turner alongside images by a multitude of lesser-known figures. Only a few have ever been seen or published before.

Historically, the British Library’s prints and drawings have been overlooked by scholars. This is the first time that a large and important body of such materials from the Library are being brought to light. While landscape images have often been treated as accurate records of place, this website reveals the many different stories involved – about travel and empire, science and exploration, the imagination, history and observation.

As well as over 500 newly-digitised works of art from the collection, this growing site will feature over 100 articles by both emerging and established scholars from many disciplines. Part of the British Library’s ongoing Transforming Topography …read more

Source:: https://romanticillustrationnetwork.wordpress.com/2017/04/27/picturing-places-at-the-british-library/

Teaching Romanticism XXII: Transatlantic Romanticism, part 3

By danielcook by Daniel Cook (general ed.) with Christopher Stampone (guest ed.) As part of this ongoing series on Teaching Romanticism we will consider the ways in which we lecture on and discuss individual authors, whether during author-specific modules or broader period surveys. I thought it would be particularly useful to hear about which texts educators use […] …read more

Source:: http://www.romtext.org.uk/teaching-romanticism-xxii-transatlantic-romanticism-part-3/

Teaching Romanticism XXI: Transatlantic Romanticism, part 2

By danielcook by Daniel Cook (general ed.) with Christopher Stampone (guest ed.) As part of this ongoing series on Teaching Romanticism we will consider the ways in which we lecture on and discuss individual authors, whether during author-specific modules or broader period surveys. I thought it would be particularly useful to hear about which texts educators use […] …read more

Source:: http://www.romtext.org.uk/teaching-romanticism-xxi-transatlantic-romanticism-part-2/

Teaching Romanticism XX: Transatlantic Romanticism, part 1

By danielcook by Daniel Cook (general ed.) with Christopher Stampone (guest ed.) As part of this ongoing series on Teaching Romanticism we will consider the ways in which we lecture on and discuss individual authors, whether during author-specific modules or broader period surveys. I thought it would be particularly useful to hear about which texts educators use […] …read more

Source:: http://www.romtext.org.uk/teaching-romanticism-xx-transatlantic-romanticism-part-1/

Emma Peacocke on Thomas Campbell’s Institutions and Lord Grondale’s Museum of Dissipation

By msangster

Emma Peacocke’s paper for the ‘Institutions as Curators’ workshop explored the topic from two different but complementary angles. The first half of her talk considered the institutional interactions of the poet, lecturer and editor Thomas Campbell, who was instrumental in the founding of the University of London and an unusually active Rector of the University of Glasgow, representing the students in their struggles with institutional restrictions and attempting to inspire them through speeches and prize-givings. The second part of her talk turned to the uses made of museums within literary works, reading Lord Grondale’s ‘Museum of Dissipation’ in Robert Bage’s Hermsprong: or, Man As He Is Not (1796) and considering the ways in which the novel engages with wider discourses of collecting, focusing particularly on intertextual relations with the works of Richard Payne Knight and with the paintings that Bage’s narrative evokes.

Emma has kindly made the PowerPoints for both parts of her talk available; these can be downloaded below.

Emma Peacocke – Thomas Campbell and the University of Glasgow as an Institution of Literature

Emma Peacocke – Museums in Romantic Literature: Robert Bage’s Hermsprong

<img src="http://institutionsofliterature.net/wp-content/uploads/2017/04/Grondale.jpg" alt="" width="418" height="660" srcset="http://institutionsofliterature.net/wp-content/uploads/2017/04/Grondale.jpg 418w, http://institutionsofliterature.net/wp-content/uploads/2017/04/Grondale-190×300.jpg 190w, http://institutionsofliterature.net/wp-content/uploads/2017/04/Grondale-165×260.jpg 165w" sizes="(max-width: 418px) 100vw, …read more

Source:: http://institutionsofliterature.net/2017/04/25/emma-peacocke-on-thomas-campbells-institutions-and-lord-grondales-museum-of-dissipation/

CFA: Making Masculinity: Craft, Gender, and Material Production in the Long Nineteenth-Century

By Anna Mercer

Picture1

Guest Editors: Dr Katie Faulkner (The Courtauld Institute of Art and Arcadia University) Dr Freya Gowrley (University of Edinburgh)

This special issue of Nineteenth-Century Gender Studies will use ‘craft’ as a framework for understanding how various forms of masculinity were constructed and expressed during the long nineteenth-century (1789-1914) in Britain and internationally.

Deadline for completed manuscripts: 30 October 2017

Please send all manuscripts and/or queries to makingmasculinity@gmail.com

CFA: Making Masculinity: Craft, Gender, and Material Production in the Long Nineteenth-Century

Narratives focusing on the heroic male artist and privileging the ‘fine art’ over the ‘decorative’ emerged in the nineteenth century and were perpetuated by modernist writers and formalist art historians throughout the twentieth century. Yet the continuing preoccupation with the male genius and his masterpieces has been challenged by feminist interventions in art historical scholarship, often by reintroducing the significance of craft, and its female practitioners, into histories of material production. This endeavour has found a particular ally in material culture studies. Unburdened by art historical divisions between the fine and decorative arts, high art and craft, a substantial literature on the relationship between women and material culture in the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries has recently emerged (see for example Maureen Daly …read more

Source:: http://www.bars.ac.uk/blog/?p=1608

The William Blake Archive: an update

By Anna Mercer

blakearchive

Please see below for a statement from the William Blake Archive:

‘Two decades ago, the William Blake Archive set out to address, through the opportunities of digital media, the considerable challenges inherent in reproducing Blake’s work. A pioneer in digital humanities scholarship, the archive has brought together both streams of Blake’s work, for the first time making it easily available as he originally created it. A newly launched, transformative redesign of the archive makes this international public resource even more accessible to scholars and casual readers.

The archive now holds almost 7,000 images from 45 of the world’s leading research libraries and museums. It integrates editions, catalogs, databases, and scholarly tools into a single electronic archive.

It’s a joint project of the University of Rochester and the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, with support from the Library of Congress. Archive cofounder and coeditor Morris Eaves, a professor of English at the University of Rochester, is available for comments or interviews.

The archive made history when, in 2003, it became the first electronic scholarly edition to receive the Prize for a Distinguished Scholarly Edition from the Modern Language Association, the major professional organization for the study and teaching of language and literature. …read more

Source:: http://www.bars.ac.uk/blog/?p=1603

Gothic Revival: CRECS Tours Strawberry Hill House, 16 May 2017

By Anthony Mandal Join the Cardiff Romanticism and Eighteenth-Century Seminar (CRECS) on 16 May 2017 for an exciting excursion, as we visit the Gothic Strawberry Hill House in Twickenham, a modern architectural marvel. With its arches and turrets, its elaborate windows and gables, and its bone-white exterior, Strawberry Hill is a bizarre cross between a Gothic castle and a Disney one. Until 1797, … Continue reading Gothic Revival: CRECS Tours Strawberry Hill House, 16 May 2017 …read more

Source:: https://crecs.wordpress.com/2017/04/21/crecs-tours-strawberry-hill-house/

Lewis Walpole Library Masterclass

By dustinfrazierwood

The Lewis Walpole Library is now accepting applications for its residential masterclass, A Contest of Two Genres: Graphic Satire and Anglo-American History Painting in the Long Eighteenth Century.

The residential course will be led by Mark Salber Phillips (Carleton University) and Cynthia Roman (Lewis Walpole Library), and will take place 15-18 May.

According to the Lewis Walpole Library website:

Centuries-old hierarchies of the visual arts have placed history painting and graphic satire at opposite ends of the spectrum. “History painting” – high minded narrative art depicting exemplary heroes and events— carried enormous prestige, bringing fame to the individual artist as well as to the national school. In contrast, graphic satire was viewed as the lowest form of visual expression – more closely connected to political prints than to high-minded “histories.”

This residential seminar is intended to give doctoral students in a variety of disciplines the opportunity to consider issues and overlaps between these two narrative genres. Making use of visual material and textual resources from the collections of the Lewis Walpole Library’s at Yale, we will examine the often-embattled efforts of artists to construct new modes of visual representation as well as of narrative and history. Through a multidisciplinary approach, we …read more

Source:: https://romanticillustrationnetwork.wordpress.com/2017/04/19/lewis-walpole-library-masterclass/

Willy Maley’s Bibliography on Institutions of Literature in the Seventeenth Century

By msangster

Willy Maley has kindly provided an extensive and illuminating bibliography of relevant primary and secondary sources for those researching institutional activities in the seventeenth century (and people considering their legacies). This can be downloaded using the link below.

Willy Maley – Third University to the Royal Society Bibliography

…read more

Source:: http://institutionsofliterature.net/2017/04/18/willy-maleys-bibliography-on-institutions-of-literature-in-the-seventeenth-century/