BARS Exchange

BARS Exchange

Aggregated blogs on Romantic Studies – please click through to read full posts.

Archive for August 2017

David Hume and the National Library of Scotland: Copley Report

By Anna Mercer

See below for a report from Rebecca Davies (NTNU, Trondheim, Norway). Rebecca was awarded a BARS Stephen Copley Research Award, and she explains her subsequent research activity here.

Rebecca Davies – Stephen Copley Award Report

I used the award to visit to the National Library of Scotland‘s special collections to begin what will eventually be an extensive examination of the letters of David Hume, as part of a broader consideration of his epistemology. This research will be incorporated into my current project on the treatment of ‘genius’ and precocity – or ingenia proecocia – in educational writing of the long eighteenth century. I am interested in how Hume – in his unguarded moments where he is not consciously the philosopher – represents human ‘powers and faculties’, and the nature of knowledge, relative to both childhood education and knowledge acquisition into adulthood. The work carried out in the NLS informs a chapter exploring the treatment of genius, learning and cognition in Enlightenment epistemology, to reassess and relocate Romantic conceptions of creative genius. As Paul Bruno has observed, Hume does not explicitly comment upon genius in the sense of originality and untutored talent in his published works. Consequently, my key focus for …read more

Source:: http://www.bars.ac.uk/blog/?p=1736

Staging Nineteenth-Century Melodrama at the Georgian Theatre Royal

By Anna Mercer

fortress-advert

Staging Nineteenth-Century Melodrama at the Georgian Theatre Royal

The Fortress on the Danube is being performed at the Georgian Theatre Royal, Yorkshire, on Friday 25 August, 7.30pm. Director: Sarah Wynne Kordas; Musical Director: Diane Tisdall; Dramaturge: Sarah Burdett. Tickets can be purchased here.

By Sarah Burdett (University of Warwick)
For the past five months, I have been working as a Post-Doctoral Research Fellow at the University of Warwick on the exciting practice-based research project ‘Staging Napoleonic Theatre’. The project, led by Dr Katherine Astbury, and funded by the AHRC, has involved staging two nineteenth-century French melodramas in translation. Roseliska, a melodrama of 1811, written and performed by French prisoners of war at Portchester Castle, was revived at the site of its original production in July 2017; and La Forteresse du Danube, (translated as The Fortress), by prolific French playwright Guilbert Pixerécourt, initially staged at the Théatre de la Porte Saint-Martin in 1805, is being revived at the Georgian Theatre Royal, Richmond, on 25 August 2017. One down, one to go!

As a British theatre historian who has spent the last four years hunched over manuscripts of Georgian play-texts in dark and silent libraries, the experience of bringing these scripts back to life …read more

Source:: http://www.bars.ac.uk/blog/?p=1724

BARS 2017 Reports: Part I

By Anna Mercer

Conference Banquet. Via @BARS_official on twitter

Thank you to everyone who came along to our international biennial conference:

BARS 2017

Romantic Improvement

The University of York

27-30 July

This was the 15th conference of the British Association for Romantic Studies.

Postgraduate bursary winners have been invited to write short reports on their experience as a delegate and/or speaker at the event. Here are the first three – more to follow at a later date.

Enjoy! You can also see the storify of the tweets, and pictures from the event, here.

Sarah Faulkner (University of Washington)

I had a wonderful time at BARS–and that wasn’t just because of the discounted ice cream, though that was a serious plus. I really enjoyed the collegiality of the conference, especially between Romanticists at all stages of their career. I felt invited to speak with senior faculty, and found new, wonderful friends among other graduate students. Having just come from the wonderful Austen/Staël conference at Chawton House Library, it was wonderful to reconnect with other Chawton delegates, and to really feel like I was a part of the Romanticist community. I have always felt a bit like an imposter in Romanticism since I study women’s novels rather than male poetry, but this conference changed that …read more

Source:: http://www.bars.ac.uk/blog/?p=1717

Sarah Comyn’s SouthHem Write-Up on Institutions as Networks

By msangster

Sarah Comyn, who gave an excellent paper on mechanics’ institutes in the colony of Victoria as part of a panel of presenters from the SouthHem project at ‘Institutions as Networks’, has written an illuminating breakdown of the workshop’s discussions, which can be seen on the SouthHem project site.

…read more

Source:: http://institutionsofliterature.net/2017/08/22/sarah-comyns-southhem-write-up-on-institutions-as-networks/

Susan Bennett on the Society of Arts

By msangster

(Many thanks to Susan Bennett (William Shipley Group for Royal Society of Arts History) for allowing us to publish the wide-ranging talk that she gave on the RSA’s eighteenth- and nineteenth-century connections at the ‘Institutions as Networks’ workshop.)


‘Little more…than of a Society in the moon’: Publicising the work of the Society for the Encouragement of Arts, Manufactures and Commerce (1754-1900)

Often confused with its sister societies, the Royal Society and the Society of Antiquaries and, because of the shortened form of its name also the Royal Academy of Arts, the Society of Arts’ membership represented the ‘Nobility, Clergy, Gentry, Merchants, etc’ from its very first meeting in 1754. Through this network, through its activities and through its publications the Society presents a wide variety of connections and networks, which this paper attempts to illuminate.

Foundation meeting of the Society of Arts, held at Rawthmell’s Coffee House 22nd March 1754, by Anna Zinkeisen, 1954. (c) RSA.

In a footnote in the first volume of his Annals of Agriculture and other Useful Arts, the agriculturist, Arthur Young hoped that ‘the excellent Society…of Arts…will not be forgotten’. In my opinion’, he added, it has ‘done by far more good with an income …read more

Source:: http://institutionsofliterature.net/2017/08/16/susan-bennett-on-the-society-of-arts/

Julian Pooley on the Nichols Family and the Society of Antiquaries

By msangster

(Many thanks to Julian Pooley (University of Leicester) for this fascinating account of the paper that he gave in the opening session of the ‘Institutions as Networks’ workshop: ‘”Dry, thorny and barbarous paths?”: The Nicholses, their Press and the Society of Antiquaries, 1777-1873′.)

I’m preparing an analytical guide to the vast, scattered archive of three generations of the Nichols family. John Nichols (1745-1826), John Bowyer Nichols (177-1863) and John Gough Nichols (1806-1873) were all printers, antiquaries and biographers, in contact through their printing business, editorship of the Gentleman’s Magazine and research interests with members of learned societies, fellow members of the book trade and private scholars across a wide range of disciplines. The database that I am using to manage detailed calendars of their letters, transcripts of their diaries and travel journals and descriptions of other papers allows us to map their contacts, trace the development of their friendships and assess the ways in which they were able to link together people of like mind and disseminate ideas and the results of research. Although I have often described the Nicholses as being at the ‘heart of the antiquarian network’ this workshop helped me to see them more …read more

Source:: http://institutionsofliterature.net/2017/08/07/julian-pooley-on-the-nichols-family-and-the-society-of-antiquaries/

The Letter to Maria Gisborne

By annamercer90

I recently attended and gave a paper at the British Association for Romantic Studies (BARS) conference. A wonderful gathering of Romanticists in York.

My supervisor (Dr. Jim Watt) was one of the organisers and it was a great event. I’d also like to thank him again for all his help – I have just submitted my minor corrections after my Viva on the 6 July.

Jim invited me to produce a Research Poster to go on display. Here it is – and if you want to read more about this research, please see my article in the Keats-Shelley Review.

More soon! & don’t forget to check out The Shelley Conference 2017 programme, now online here.

Screen Shot 2017-08-07 at 20.16.02

…read more

Source:: https://percyandmaryshelley.wordpress.com/2017/08/07/the-letter-to-maria-gisborne/