BARS Exchange

BARS Exchange

Aggregated blogs on Romantic Studies – please click through to read full posts.

Archive for December 2017

On This Day in 1817: 28 December, The Immortal Dinner

By Anna Mercer

The ‘On This Day’ series continues with a post by Ana Stevenson to celebrate 200 years since a gathering of remarkable intellects…

Christ’s Entry into Jerusalem, 1824 – 1820 by Benjamin Robert Haydon

The Immortal Dinner
by Ana Stevenson

Born in 1786, Benjamin Robert Haydon was a history painter who surrounded himself by men whose genius he judged equal to his own. Although Haydon is less well-known today, he was highly regarded as an artist in his own time. In 1804 he entered the Royal Academy Schools in London and exhibited there for the first time at the age of 21. Although this led to recognition and commissions, he did not have a steady income, meaning that he was in constant debt and struggled financially until the end of his life.

In 1817, however, Haydon moved to 22 Lisson Grove, where he was in possession of his own furniture and house-appliances for the first time. He wrote that he had used ‘my own tea cup and saucers. I took up my own knife. I sat on my own chair. It was a new sensation!’.

Benjamin Robert Haydon, 1825 portrait by Georgiana Zornlin

Fond of social gatherings, his new house also …read more

Source:: http://www.bars.ac.uk/blog/?p=1892

CfP: 44th International Byron Conference

By Anna Mercer

Improvisation and Mobility

44th International Byron Conference

Ravenna 2-7 July 2018

Call for Papers

The Italian Byron Society is pleased to announce the 44th International Byron Conference to be held in Ravenna from 2 to 7 July 2018. Website here.

Byron’s most famous use of the word “mobility” is in Don Juan, Canto 16, stanza XCVII, where he uses it to describe Lady Adeline Amundeville, adding a footnote in which he defines it as “excessive susceptibility of nimmediate impressions”. Since then the word has been taken up by critics and biographers from Thomas Moore and Lady Blessington onwards, to refer to what seems an essential quality of Byron’s personality and poetry (and, particularly in more recent years, politics). The word has sometimes been linked with the notion of improvisation, especially when considering the spontaneity (or apparent spontaneity) of his verse: “I rattle on exactly as I’d talk / With any body in a ride or walk.” (Don Juan, 15, XIX). The conference will welcome 20-minute papers on topics including, but not necessarily limited to:

– formal experimentalism and improvisation

– multiplicity of voices

– hyphenated identities

– genre hybridity

– experience and imagination, fact and fiction

– geographical mobility

– cosmopolitan visions and identities

– political mobility and improvisation

– reinterpretations …read more

Source:: http://www.bars.ac.uk/blog/?p=1899

The Negative Capability StoryMap

By The Keats Letters Project The KLP Editors Keats University (JK!) Re: Keats’s 21, 27 Dec 1817 letter to George and Tom Keats To start off our extended commemoration of negative capability, first take a deep dive into what Keats was up to in mid-to-late December 1817. Turns out he was pretty busy! You can read the StoryMap as embedded… The Negative Capability StoryMap …read more

Source:: http://keatslettersproject.com/correspondence/the-negative-capability-storymap/