BARS Exchange

BARS Exchange

Aggregated blogs on Romantic Studies – please click through to read full posts.

Archive for January 2018

Applications welcome for new BARS Secretary

By Anna Mercer

The ​Executive Committee of the British Association for Romantic Studies is recruiting a new Secretary.

The Secretary is responsible for the organisation and minuting of face to face and on-line Executive meetings, and serving as the first contact point for the Association. They circulate funding applications to the Executive Committee and liaise with applicants. Members of the Executive Committee are expected to attend three meetings (one at the biennial conference) and contribute to one ‘virtual’ meeting in a two-year cycle.

The post does not carry remuneration but it is an excellent opportunity for an early-career Romanticist to gain valuable experience and skills.

Informal enquiries about the role should be directed to the outgoing Secretary, Helen Stark (h.stark@ucl.ac.uk). Applications should be made to the President, Ian Haywood (I.Haywood@roehampton.ac.uk) and comprise a CV and a statement (up to 300 words) detailing the applicant’s qualification for the role. The start date is negotiable but no later than June 2018. Deadline for applications: 19 Feb 2018.

…read more

Source:: http://www.bars.ac.uk/blog/?p=1926

Call for Papers: Romantic Exchanges, 1760-1840 – 2018 BARS Early Career and Postgraduate Conference

By Matthew Sangster

Call for Papers

Romantic Exchanges, 1760-1840

British Association for Romantic Studies Early Career and Postgraduate Conference

University of Glasgow, 15–16 June 2018

Keynote Speakers: Professor Gerard Carruthers (University of Glasgow) and Dr Susan Manly (University of St Andrews)

The BARS Early Career and Postgraduate Conference will explore the concept of exchange in Romantic-period literature and thought. It will bring together postgraduate and early-career researchers whose work addresses this idea from a wide range of perspectives: from the economic exchange of objects and commodities, to the transnational circulation of books and ideas, to neglected connections between writers, texts and contexts.

We invite proposals for themed panels, as well as proposals for the traditional individual twenty-minute paper. Applicants might choose to address some of the following, though we also encourage you to interpret the theme more widely:

  • Commercial exchange: trade, commodities, the literary marketplace, economic value.
  • Epistolary exchange: letters, correspondence, bills of exchange, legal documents.
  • Financial exchange: money, gifts, credit, indebtedness, political economy.
  • Historical exchange: transmission and reception of writers and works across generations.
  • Intellectual exchange: literary networks and coteries, periodicals and print culture, public opinion.
  • International exchange: travel, intercultural encounters, translation, transnational circulation.
  • Interpersonal exchange: influence, collaboration and conversation between writers.

Please send abstracts of up to 250 words for individual papers or …read more

Source:: http://www.bars.ac.uk/blog/?p=1923

Call for Papers: Frankenstein – Parable of the Modern Age

By Matthew Sangster

Please see below for a Call for Papers from the Inklings Society for Literature and Aesthetics for a September 2018 conference on Frankenstein in Ingolstadt, close to the very building in which Frankenstein – if he had existed – would have attended his medical studies and worked on his creation.
CALL FOR PAPERS
Deadline February 15 2018
Please submit proposals of up to 500 words, along with a short CV to: karl.kegler@hm.edu
FRANKENSTEIN — PARABLE OF THE MODERN AGE
1818 · 2018
International Symposium of the Inklings-Society
Ingolstadt, 28th – 29th September 2018
The year 2018 marks the 200th anniversary of a novel that has had a lasting impact on literary fantasy, but also on thinking about ethics and science. The fact that Mary Shelley thought of more than a mere scary story when she anonymously published her novel Frankenstein in 1818 is illustrated by the alternative title: The Modern Prometheus. By referring to the ancient myth of Prometheus, it implies the relationship between creator and creature. One of Shelley’s fundamental literary innovations is to tell the story from the creature’s own point of view over substantial parts of the book. Coming into existence, Frankenstein’s creature at first desires nothing more …read more

Source:: http://www.bars.ac.uk/blog/?p=1910

Review of Mary Shelley’s Frankenstein in New York City, January 2018

By annamercer90

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Mary Shelley’s Frankenstein

Directed by Donald T. Sanders

The Irene Diamond Stage at the Pershing Square Signature Center, New York City

A Review by Anna Mercer

The last stage production of Mary Shelley’s Frankenstein I saw was a wonderful experience. The Royal Opera House’s ballet version of the novel was captivating, and reflected the text’s themes of pursuit and terror with a striking intensity (read my review here). I’m always wary of adaptations of things I love – but after my positive experience at the ballet in London, I decided to go along to ‘Mary Shelley’s Frankenstein‘ when I was visiting New York. This new production by ‘Ensemble for the Romantic Century’ was held in the Pershing Square Signature Center, a lovely venue. But the play itself was a disappointment overall, with only a few redeeming features.

One of the many differences between this play and the ballet was the inclusion of Mary Shelley herself as a character. It is always exciting to hear Mary Shelley’s words read aloud on stage – and in this case it was not just the text of her ‘hideous progeny’, but excerpts from her letters and journals. However there were some strange modifications. The composition of …read more

Source:: https://percyandmaryshelley.wordpress.com/2018/01/18/review-of-mary-shelleys-frankenstein-in-new-york-city-january-2018/