BARS Exchange

BARS Exchange

Aggregated blogs on Romantic Studies – please click through to read full posts.

Archive for June 2019

Introducing Project ERIN: Thomas Moore in Europe

By Matthew Sangster

ERIN documents two of Thomas Moore’s song series – the Irish Melodies (1808-1834) and National Airs (1818-1827) – as well as music inspired by his ‘oriental romance’ Lalla Rookh (1817). ERIN enables the user to track the production and dissemination of these works in Europe, from their respective dates of creation through to 1880. Any contributors to this process (composers, arrangers, editors, illustrators, engravers, publishers, etc.) are indexed or tagged as part of the project. All of ERIN’s resources are now available at www.erin.qub.ac.uk. This website unites the previously available blog and OMEKA resources (images) with some new features, including podcasts and a catalogue that unites the collections of eight European repositories. ERIN was co-produced by Dr Tríona O’Hanlon (Dublin) and Dr Sarah McCleave (Queen’s University Belfast) and was supported by the Horizon 2020 Framework of the European Union and Queen’s University Belfast.

To complement ERIN’s launch, the exhibition, ‘Discovering Thomas Moore: Ireland in nineteenth-century Europe’ is on display at the Royal Irish Academy, Dublin from 17 June to 23 December 2019. ‘Discovering Thomas Moore’ is curated by Dr Sarah McCleave (Queen’s University Belfast). For further information about this exhibition and a series of complementary lectures on Thomas Moore, …read more

Source:: http://www.bars.ac.uk/blog/?p=2447

Free Event: 200th Anniversary of Peterloo at Keats House

By Anna Mercer

Afternoon Poems Special: 200th Anniversary of Peterloo

16 August 2019, 2-4pm

Keats House, Hampstead

‘Massacre at St. Peter’s or “Britons strike home”!!!’ by George Cruikshank (British Museum)

Join the Keats House Poetry Ambassadors for a reading of Percy Bysshe Shelley’s poem The Mask of Anarchy. This revolutionary work was written in response to the Peterloo massacre which occurred in St Peter’s Fields, Manchester, on 16 August 1819.

Professor Ian Haywood – of the University of Roehampton and President of BARS – will also be present to discuss Peterloo itself and then the poem’s historic context.

Rise like Lions after slumber
In unvanquishable number –
Shake your chains to earth like dew
Which in sleep had fallen on you –
Ye are many – they are few.

Free – book your space here.

…read more

Source:: http://www.bars.ac.uk/blog/?p=2442

BARS 2020 ECR & PGR Conference: Volunteer Helpers

By Matthew Sangster

The BARS Postgraduate Representatives, Amanda Blake Davis and Colette Davies, invite current postgraduate students with postgraduate status until Summer 2020 to assist with the running of the BARS 2020 ECR and PGR Conference. The conference will be held at Keats House, Hampstead, from 12th-13th June 2020. We are looking for four volunteers to assist with the preparations, set up and stewarding of the conference. An overview of the responsibilities is as follows:

  • Help with preparations beforehand: assembling conference bags, programmes, etc.
  • Help set up the conference: lifting and moving chairs and tables, preparing and replenishing hot and chilled beverages, etc.
  • Steward on the days of conference: assist delegates where needed, such as setting up PowerPoint presentations, etc.

We expect conference volunteers to be available to help on Thursday 11th June to set up. In return, the selected volunteers will be offered a subsidised conference registration fee. Please note that the conference fee does not include accommodation.

Please send expressions of interest, including relevant experience, in no more than 400 words to both of these email addresses: colette.davies@nottingham.ac.uk and abdavis1@sheffield.ac.uk. Please also state what year of your PhD you are in and your affiliated …read more

Source:: http://www.bars.ac.uk/blog/?p=2438

Narratives of Ageing in the Nineteenth Century: Registration Open

By Anna Mercer

Narratives of Ageing in the Nineteenth Century

University of Lincoln, 23 July 2019

Plenary Speaker: Prof. Devoney Looser, Arizona State University, ‘Ageing in Public: Women Authors in the Nineteenth Century’

Organisers: Dr Alice Crossley, Dr Amy Culley, Dr Rebecca Styler

This conference responds to the burgeoning critical interest of humanities scholars in age, ageing, and stages of life from childhood to old age in the literature and culture of the nineteenth century. Scholars from literature, history, art history, and the social sciences will address the experiences, conceptions, and representations of the ageing process in a variety of media, forms, and genres. Panel topics are as follows:

  • Writing and Im/maturity
  • Ageing as Decline?
  • Women Ageing with Authority
  • Recovering the Ageing Body
  • Counter/Stereotypes of Ageing
  • The Bildung Narrative and its Discontents

A selection of papers from the conference will form the basis of a special issue on ‘Narratives of Ageing in the Nineteenth Century’ for the journal Age, Culture, Humanities to appear in 2021.

There is no charge for the conference, but registration is required. The deadline for registration is 17 July 2019.

Click here to visit the conference website (with programme and abstracts).

If you have any queries please contact Dr Amy Culley (aculley@lincoln.ac.uk)

…read more

Source:: http://www.bars.ac.uk/blog/?p=2433

Stephen Copley Research Report: Gabriella Barnard-Edmunds at the Bodleian Libraries

By Anna Mercer

This report is by Gabriella Barnard-Edmunds (University of York). You can find out about how to apply for a BARS Copley Research Award here.

Image via John Cairns/University of Oxford.

Thanks to the generous support of BARS and the Stephen Copley Research Award, I am freshly returned from a glorious week’s worth of rummaging through the John Johnson Collection at the Bodleian Libraries, Oxford. My PhD examines the narrative function of the horse-drawn carriage in Jane Austen’s fictions, and investigates its cultural significance in wider Georgian society. I support my literary enquiries with a few key contemporary trade sources on the design and construction of carriages, but as I’ve discovered over the course of my research, eighteenth-century coach-makers were a fiercely secretive bunch and frustratingly little archival evidence survives today. In comes the John Johnson Collection’s boxes and boxes of carriage related trade ephemera!

Print and visual depictions of private carriages, stage and mail coaches, driving disasters, stately processions and everything in between abound in libraries and archives, the carriage seems to have been a favourite target for eighteenth-century cartoonists and novelists alike to publicly lampoon. Whilst I relish the fact my doctoral work means I get to study …read more

Source:: http://www.bars.ac.uk/blog/?p=2428

Conference Report: Vampyre Symposium

By Matthew Sangster

Below, Bill Hughes reports on “‘Some curious disquiet’: Polidori, the Byronic vampire, and its progeny”, a BARS-supported Open Graves, Open Minds symposium celebrating the bicentenary of John Polidori’s The Vampire held on the 6th and 7th of April 2019.


This event was not only the bicentenary of the publication of ‘The Vampyre’ but also 200 years since John Keats lived at the conference venue: the beautiful Keats House, Hampstead. We began the symposium with a fascinating tour round the house by Rob Shakespeare where we saw a first edition of ‘The Vampyre’ (which may possibly have been owned by Keats).

Our first paper was by Nick Groom, who began with an outline of the reports on vampires from Eastern Europe that arose in the early eighteenth century and how they were transformed into literary forms. Referring to the momentous occasion in 1816 at the Villa Diodati, Nick elaborated an unexpected and illuminating notion of the vampiric elements in Mary Shelley’s Frankenstein (Mary, we learn, had called Percy a vampire), such as blood imagery, blood transfusion, and the story itself as contagious and blood-chilling. This culminates in a reading of Frankenstein as recognising the situation of non-human nature.

Ivan Phillips then explored …read more

Source:: http://www.bars.ac.uk/blog/?p=2419

Stephen Copley Research Report: Alice Rhodes on John Thelwall’s Manuscripts in Derby

By Anna Mercer

See how to apply for a Stephen Copley Research Award with BARS here.

Stephen Copley Research Award Report: John Thelwall Manuscripts at Derby Local Studies and Family History Library

by Alice Rhodes

This May, thanks to the BARS Stephen Copley Research Award, I was able to spend a week in Derby Local Studies and Family History Library. I carried out research into poet and political orator turned speech therapist, John Thelwall, and his “Derby Manuscript”. The collection, contained within three volumes of notebooks and spanning almost a thousand pages, includes poetry on subjects as diverse as Thelwall’s own career and was identified by Judith Thompson in 2004. The manuscript, begun after Thelwall’s “retirement” from political lecturing, contains not only published and unpublished poems from this period of his life, but also reworkings of earlier published work, including several poems from his 1793 “politico-sentimental journal” The Peripatetic.

Derby Local Studies and Family History Library

My PhD thesis explores speech production in British literature in the late eighteenth and early nineteenth centuries, with a particular focus on the work of Erasmus Darwin, John Thelwall and Percy Bysshe Shelley. I aim to argue that speech production becomes a focal point for these writers …read more

Source:: http://www.bars.ac.uk/blog/?p=2414