BARS Exchange

BARS Exchange

Aggregated blogs on Romantic Studies – please click through to read full posts.

Archive for October 2019

BARS Treasurer, BARS Membership Secretary: Invitation for Expressions of Interest

By Anna Mercer

The following message is from Anthony Mandal, BARS President.

Dear BARS Members,

As announced at the BARS 2019 conference in Nottingham, our Treasurer & Membership Secretary, Dr Jane Moore, is stepping down at the end of this year. Since her election in 2013, she has worked tirelessly over six years marked by a growing membership, an expanding range of funding opportunities and new partnerships with external organisations. On behalf of BARS, the Executive would like to reiterate its thanks to Jane for her diligence and commitment over these years. It has been a pleasure working with her and she will be missed.

The Executive would also like to extend its gratitude to Dr Nicola Lloyd, who has assisted Jane over these years in preparing budgets, updating accounts and monitoring membership records.

In the context of BARS’ continuing expansion and diversification, it has become apparent that the role of Treasurer & Membership Secretary is now an extensive and demanding one. In light of this, the Executive wish to split the role into two separate posts. Such a decoupling would also align BARS with the practices of fellow societies …read more

Source:: http://www.bars.ac.uk/blog/?p=2694

Techne Collaborative Doctoral Award 2020

By Emily Paterson-Morgan

The Keats House Collections: Constructing Romantic Lives and Afterlives

Applications are invited for a fully-funded, three-year PhD to be hosted jointly by Keats House and the Centre for Research in Romanticism at the University of Roehampton, London, UK. The PhD will begin in October 2020. This is an exciting opportunity to work with an internationally famous museum which celebrates the life and works of one of Britain’s greatest poets. Situated in Hampstead, London, Keats House contains many precious artefacts including correspondence, books and portraits. Its non-displayed collections are cared for by London Metropolitan Archives, who work with the House to provide access for researchers and anyone with an interest in Keats and his circle.

The aim of this project is to investigate the ways that a writer’s house and its collections can actively contribute to the cultural memory, reputation and appreciation of a canonical author. The exact topic of the PhD will be decided by the student in conjunction with supervisors, but we expect the development of the collections to provide an outstanding opportunity to put new research insights into practice through actual and virtual curation of the collections. The project provides excellent career opportunities and will provide relevant training in archives, …read more

Source:: http://www.bars.ac.uk/blog/?p=2690

The 13th Annual Wordsworth Lecture

By Emily Paterson-Morgan

Wednesday 20 November 2019, 6.00pm, free

The University of London, Chancellor’s Hall, Senate House

Malet Street, London, WC1E 7HU.

Followed by a drinks reception.

Professor Lucy Newlyn – ‘Vital Stream’: Love and Creativity in the Wordsworth Circle, 1802

1802 was an extraordinary year in the Wordsworth circle. William and Dorothy Wordsworth were writing some of their most beautiful poetry and prose, while Coleridge’s marriage was in a state of near collapse. Professor Lucy Newlyn’s new book Vital Stream draws on a detailed knowledge of letters, poems, notebooks and journals to explore their thoughts and feelings about love, family bonds, friendship and creativity at this time. In this lecture, Lucy will read from her collection and describe how she has re-told a famous love story for a modern audience, in sonnet-form.

Professor Lucy Newlyn is an academic and a poet, and was Fellow and Tutor in English at St Edmund Hall, Oxford for 32 years before retiring in 2016. She now lives and writes in Cornwall.

To reserve a place email Hannah Stratton, Development Officer, h.stratton@wordsworth.org.uk

…read more

Source:: http://www.bars.ac.uk/blog/?p=2688

Romantic Reimaginings: Victor Victorious? Frankenstein’s Creation as Failed Romantic Revolution

By Eleanor Bryan

Romantic Reimaginings is a BARS blog series which seeks to explore the ways in which texts of the Romantic era continue to resonate. The blog is curated by Eleanor Bryan. If you would like to publish an article in the series, please email ebryan@lincoln.ac.uk.

Today on the blog, Garrett Jeter discusses Frankenstein’s monster as a metaphor for a failed Romantic revolution.

When Victor Frankenstein gazes at his Creature in admiration, then horror, in reality he contemplates a failed revolution. More, he witnesses the failure of a Romantic project. What had fuelled a passion, a glowing vision for radical improvement in human existence, ended in wrecked hopes: “I had desired it with an ardour that far exceeded moderation; but … the beauty of the dream vanished” (43). Victor had employed science to advance a revolution in the human condition, dethroning the tyrannical rule of Nature, and realising a utopia of human happiness. As Peter Vernon notes, he speaks of his experiments “in visionary terms” (278). Fred Randel asserts that Frankenstein (1818) is Shelley’s “astute extension and complication” involving revolution and revolutionary ideas (466). In his estimation, Nature’s imposition of mortality on humanity constitutes oppression. Victor’s creative process and quest set two ideals of …read more

Source:: http://www.bars.ac.uk/blog/?p=2682

Dr Tess Somervell – 29 October 2019

By annamercer90 Join us on 29 October for a talk by Dr Tess Somervell from the University of Leeds. Tess’s research interests: My research is in literature of the long eighteenth century, particularly poetry. My doctoral research focused on time in three long poems of the (very) long eighteenth century: Milton’s Paradise Lost, Thomson’s The Seasons, and … Continue reading Dr Tess Somervell – 29 October 2019 …read more

Source:: https://crecs.wordpress.com/2019/10/22/dr-tess-somervell-29-october-2019/

Romantic Reimaginings: The Ecstasy of Samuel Taylor Coleridge

By Eleanor Bryan

Romantic Reimaginings is a BARS blog series which seeks to explore the ways in which texts of the Romantic era continue to resonate. The blog is curated by Eleanor Bryan. If you would like to publish an article in the series, please email ebryan@lincoln.ac.uk.

Today on the blog, Adam Neikirk provides a personal account of his work on poetical biographies of Samuel Taylor Coleridge.

Seamus Perry, author of Coleridge and the Uses of Division (Oxford English Monographs, 1999) once commented to me that his task of writing his contribution for the Oxford Handbook of Samuel Taylor Coleridge (Oxford UP, 2009), on ‘Coleridge’s Literary Influence’, felt “a bit like trying to describe an alp”. “The achievement is so various,” writes Perry at the beginning of the article, and the literary influence so diverse, that no generalization here can be useful: there is no single distinctive ‘Coleridgean’ idiom or manner for later poets to appropriate or reject … Neither are the lines of influence always clearly defined: no subsequent ballad can hope to escape the example of ‘The Ancient Mariner’ … (661).

Samuel Taylor Coleridge by Peter Vandyke, 1795

Perry’s alp remark, while more compact, is perhaps even more illuminating of our general attitude to STC: …read more

Source:: http://www.bars.ac.uk/blog/?p=2677

Call for Papers – Global Blake: Afterlives in Art, Literature and Music

By Emily Paterson-Morgan

11-12 September 2020

University of Lincoln, Lincoln, UK

In recent years a body of work – including Blake, Modernity and Popular Culture (2007), Blake 2.0: William Blake in Twentieth-Century Art, Music and Culture (2012), William Blake and the Age of Aquarius (2017), William Blake and the Myth of America (2018), and The Reception of William Blake in Europe (2019) – has emerged around the posthumous reception of the artist and poet, William Blake. From almost complete obscurity following his death in 1827, Blake has become one of the most important figures in British cultural life. What is less understood, outside certain pockets such as the USA and Japan, is the significance of Blake elsewhere in the world.

Today, Blake’s global presence cannot be underestimated. The aim of this project is to showcase the wide variety of global ‘Blakes’ (after Morris Eaves’s “On Blakes We Want and Blakes We Don’t”, 1995, and Mike Goode’s “Blakespotting”, 2006) and to provide an overview of the appropriations and rewritings as well as examples, that fall into three categories: art, literature and music. It will examine how Blake’s global audiences have responded to his poetry and art as well as explore what these specific, non-British responses and …read more

Source:: http://www.bars.ac.uk/blog/?p=2671

The 28th Annual NASSR Conference

By Emily Paterson-Morgan

Romanticism and Vision

28th Annual Conference of the North American Society for the Study of Romanticism (NASSR)

University of Toronto, Ontario on August 6-9, 2020.

For more details Click Here

The organizers of NASSR 2020 invite proposals for papers, panels, and roundtables–from scholars emerging and established, and in all areas of literary, philosophical, cultural, and artistic study–on the theme of “Romanticism and Vision.” In the field of Romanticism, the implications of “vision” as a keyword have changed dramatically over the last half-century, and have expanded to include (for example) the embodied senses, technologies of perception, visual and material culture, and the visual and performing arts. We welcome presentations that explore Romanticism’s connection to vision, the visual, and the visionary, understood in the widest possible sense. Approaches that broaden Romanticism’s disciplinary, geographical, and linguistic scope are especially welcome. In our echoing of the “Vision 2020” and “Beyond 2020” motif currently being deployed in academic, business, and public sectors, we aim to make this year’s conference an opportunity to consider the future of Romanticism as a critical field of humanist study, and to strategize about the role of Romanticism in shaping the future of the university.

Topics may include (but are not limited to):

Mapping Keats’s Progress: A Critical Chronology, by G. Kim Blank

By Dr Fallon

mw03553

About a million years ago, when I was an MA student, I wrote a comparative thesis on the poetry of John Keats and Percy Shelley. Some years later, as a prof, and after a PhD on ShelIey and William Wordsworth, I was able to write Shelley out of my system. I later managed to do the same with Wordsworth.

But Keats—not so much.

Yet, from the start, he was the dead, white, English, male poet who intrigued me most, and thoughts about him continued to plague and attract me. The old question lurked: How did little Johnny (all five-foot-two-inches of him) become so damn good so darn quickly? How did he move so fast, and so dramatically, from writing mainly bad, random, I-wannabe-a-poet poetry to composing some of the best verse in the language? When, in October 1818, Keats confidently (though privately) declared he would be an enduring poet after his death, he hadn’t written much to earn that claim. But he was about to. And almost all of it within a year. After that, circumstances and the slow death sentence of consumption wasted him away. He died in Rome in February 1821, aged twenty-five.

About eight years or so ago, I began …read more

Source:: https://romanticillustrationnetwork.com/2019/10/11/mapping-keatss-progress-a-critical-chronology-by-g-kim-blank/

Romantic Reimaginings: Luke Howard, Namer of Clouds

By Eleanor Bryan

Romantic Reimaginings is a BARS blog series which seeks to explore the ways in which texts of the Romantic era continue to resonate. The blog is curated by Eleanor Bryan. If you would like to publish an article in the series, please email ebryan@lincoln.ac.uk.

Today on the blog, Tess Somervell explores the resonance of Luke Howard’s writings on clouds.

A contender for the best English Heritage blue plaque in London is that commemorating the chemist and meteorologist Luke Howard (1772-1864), at 7 Bruce Grove, Tottenham. Howard is listed simply as ‘Namer of Clouds’.

In December 1802, Howard gave a lecture to the Askesian Society called the ‘Essay on Clouds’, published the following year as an essay ‘On the Modification of Clouds’. Previously most meteorologists had held that clouds were too transient and variable to classify. But Howard argued that clouds shifted between a limited number of fundamental forms or ‘modifications’, for which he proposed the Latin nomenclature that we still use today: cumulus, cirrus, stratus, nimbus, and their various combinations.

Luke Howard blue plaque. Photo by Acabashi.

Howard’s theory of cloud formation immediately caught the imaginations of Romantic poets and artists: its influence can be seen in Percy Shelley’s 1820 poem ‘The Cloud’ and in …read more

Source:: http://www.bars.ac.uk/blog/?p=2657