BARS Exchange

BARS Exchange

Aggregated blogs on Romantic Studies – please click through to read full posts.

Archive for November 2019

Romantic Reimaginings: Tension in Coleridge’s ‘Fears in Solitude’

By Eleanor Bryan

Romantic Reimaginings is a BARS blog series which seeks to explore the ways in which texts of the Romantic era continue to resonate. The blog is curated by Eleanor Bryan. If you would like to publish an article in the series, please email ebryan@lincoln.ac.uk.

Today on the blog, Mariyah Mandhu (University of Sheffield) discusses tension in Samuel Taylor Coleridge’s ‘Fears in Solitude’.

Samuel Taylor Coleridge’s Fears in Solitude (1798) is frequently considered as one of the poet’s most political works.[1] The volatility of this lyric has often been attributed to Coleridge’s political torment,[2] yet the implications of his experimentation with genre have largely been ignored. Sponsoring Carl Woodring’s observation that politics ‘agitated the body of [Coleridge’s] verse with severe but local storms’,[3] Coleridge uses the pastoral to inform his tale of nationalism. Rupturing the unified, idyllic landscape of pastoral, the poet darkens the natural world to a point of high anxiety, creating an insoluble tension in his poem. Reconsidering Fears in Solitude as an exercise in genre, this blog post will explore how the pastoral informs the political drive of this ‘Conversation Poem’.

Fears in Solitude opens with a typical scene of pastoral retreat in the Quantock …read more

Source:: http://www.bars.ac.uk/blog/?p=2732

Dr Rhys Kaminski-Jones – 18 November 2019

By annamercer90 Join us on 18 November 2019 for a talk by Dr Rhys Kaminski-Jones. Here are Rhys’s research interests: Rhys Kaminski-Jones’s work focuses on connections between Welsh, English, and other Celtic literatures during the eighteenth century and the Romantic era, and on building links between Celtic Studies and other academic disciplines. Having studied for a BA … Continue reading Dr Rhys Kaminski-Jones – 18 November 2019 …read more

Source:: https://crecs.wordpress.com/2019/11/17/dr-rhys-kaminski-jones-18-november-2019/

Romantic Reimaginings: Adaptation and Convergence in Poe (Part 3 of 3)

By Eleanor Bryan

Romantic Reimaginings is a BARS blog series which seeks to explore the ways in which texts of the Romantic era continue to resonate. The blog is curated by Eleanor Bryan. If you would like to publish an article in the series, please email ebryan@lincoln.ac.uk.

Today on the blog our article is the final article in a 3 part series in which Jeff L. Wright (University of Arkansas) discusses adaptations of the works of Edgar Allen Poe. His first article (link below) examined Poe’s The Raven in the context of Halloween. Parts 2 and 3 examine Richard Corben’s comic book adaptations of Poe, tracing the evolution of these adaptations from the cultural ‘memeplex’ to the individual ‘selfplex’.

Part 1: bars.ac.uk/blog/?p=2721

Part 2: bars.ac.uk/blog/?p=2724

Part 3:

For this Romantic Reimagining, I would like to continue our exploration of the bio-evolutionary model of memes in Richard Corben’s comic book adaptations of Edgar Allen Poe’s, “The Raven”. In part one, I discussed the ways in which memes are transferred from the cultural memeplex into our own individual brains, called the selfplex. Richard Corben’s original adaptation of this poem incorporated a painterly, watercolor style of pen-and-ink to create …read more

Source:: http://www.bars.ac.uk/blog/?p=2727

Romantic Reimaginings: Adaptation and Convergence in Poe (Part 2 of 3)

By Eleanor Bryan

Romantic Reimaginings is a BARS blog series which seeks to explore the ways in which texts of the Romantic era continue to resonate. The blog is curated by Eleanor Bryan. If you would like to publish an article in the series, please email ebryan@lincoln.ac.uk.

Today on the blog our article is Part 2 in a 3 part series in which Jeff L. Wright (University of Arkansas) discusses adaptations of the works of Edgar Allen Poe. His first article (link below) examined Poe’s The Raven in the context of Halloween. Parts 2 and 3 examine Richard Corben’s comic book adaptations of Poe, tracing the evolution of these adaptations from the cultural ‘memeplex’ to the individual ‘selfplex’.

Part 1: bars.ac.uk/blog/?p=2721

Part 2:

My childhood fascination with horror comics would eventually come full circle as I conducted my research in grad school where, amongst many other interdisciplinary interests, the Dawkins/Bartolotti/Hutcheon evolutionary concepts of memes became a prime ingredient in most of my research. In terms of Romantic Reimaginings, I would like to take a look at the ways in which the bio-evolutionary theory of memes and adaptation work using adaptations of Edgar Allen Poe’s “The Raven”, in the comic books of …read more

Source:: http://www.bars.ac.uk/blog/?p=2724

Romantic Reimaginings: Adaptation and Convergence in Poe (Part 1 of 3)

By Eleanor Bryan

Romantic Reimaginings is a BARS blog series which seeks to explore the ways in which texts of the Romantic era continue to resonate. The blog is curated by Eleanor Bryan. If you would like to publish an article in the series, please email ebryan@lincoln.ac.uk.

Today on the blog, in the inaugural article of a three part series, Jeff L. Wright (University of Arkansas) discusses adaptations of the works of Edgar Allen Poe. His first article examines Poe’s The Raven in the context of Halloween. Parts 2 and 3 examine Richard Corben’s comic book adaptations of Poe, tracing the evolution of these adaptations from the cultural ‘memeplex’ to the individual ‘selfplex’.

Part 1

Growing up in the woods of Sherwood may seem like some sort of magical childhood full of secret gardens and talking lions, but in reality, Sherwood, Arkansas was your typical run-of-the-mill suburban, U.S. town in the “South.” Every year there were fireworks on the 4th of July, pastel suits and Easter egg hunting, and of course lights and parades to celebrate Thanksgiving and Christmas. The holidays were always a lot of fun; they broke up the monotony of school with guaranteed days off and the hope of material goods in the …read more

Source:: http://www.bars.ac.uk/blog/?p=2721

The Maureen Crisp Young Scholars Fund – Byron Conference Bursaries

By Emily Paterson-Morgan

The Maureen Crisp Young Scholars Fund invites applications for funding from post-graduate scholars intending to present an academic paper at an approved Byron conference or a paper mainly on Byron at any other approved conference in or outside the United Kingdom.

The student (irrespective of nationality) should be studying at a University in the United Kingdom. Applications may be submitted at any time and should include a CV and the names of one, preferably two referees. An abstract of the paper to be read will be required, and details of the conference including its approximate total costs.

The candidate will be notified as soon as possible whether they will be granted a fund or otherwise but actual funding will only be provided once there is confirmation that the candidate’s paper has been accepted.

In the event of the scholar being unable to attend the conference for whatever reason after a grant has be made, then the grant will be repayable in full forthwith to the Maureen Crisp Young Scholars Fund. An application for funding to the trustees does not mean a grant will automatically be given

In the first instance please contact: www.newsteadabbeybyronsociety.org/contact

…read more

Source:: http://www.bars.ac.uk/blog/?p=2718

CFP: ‘Poetry & Painting: Conversations’ – An Interdisciplinary Conference; University of Oxford, 23 March 2020

By Dr Fallon

CFP: ‘Poetry & Painting: Conversations’ – An Interdisciplinary Conference;

Faculty of English, University of Oxford, 23 March 2020.

You know how

I feel about painters. I sometimes think poetry

only describes.

Frank O’Hara, ‘John Button Birthday’ (1957)

The supposed similarity between poetry and painting was famously characterized in Horace’s ‘Ars Poetica’ by the dictum ‘ut pictura poesis’ (‘as is painting, so is poetry’). Yet in 1766, Gotthold Ephraim Lessing influentially argued for the limits that condition these different art forms — how could a visual scream ever be rendered linguistically?

The intense and ambivalent relationship between the so-called “sister arts” of poetry and painting has long been a subject of critical enquiry. The multiple tensions and affinities shared by these expressive forms are fruitful topics of a discussion that is currently enjoying a revival both within and beyond academia.

Co-organisers Drs Jasmine Jagger and Jack Parlett invite you to share your thoughts on this relationship for a one-day conference in Oxford. This symposium seeks to ignite and develop critical and trans-historical conversations about the interplay between the sister arts. Contributors may consider, but need not be limited to:

London-Paris Romanticism Seminar: British Responses to the 1830 Revolution in France, international panel, Friday 15 November 2019, Senate House, University of London

By LPRS

1830 advert

The next meeting of the London-Paris Romanticism Seminar will be held on Friday 15 November 2019 and feature an international panel on British Responses to the 1830 Revolution in France. We are delighted to welcome as our guest speakers three outstanding scholars: Professor Ian Haywood (University of Roehampton), whose paper is entitled How to Do Revolution: Three Glorious Days in a Caricature Magazine; Dr James Grande (King’s College London), who will talk on Cobbett, Captain Swing, and the July Revolution; and Dr Laurent Folliot (Sorbonne University, Paris), who respond to their papers. Abstracts appear below.

The seminar will be held in the Bloomsbury Room (G35, ground floor) at Senate House, University of London, starting at 5.30. The papers and response will be followed by a discussion and wine reception. Everyone is invited, including postgraduates and members of the public. Admission is free and no registration is needed.

ian 2Ian Haywood is Professor of English at the University of Roehampton, London, where he is Director of the Centre for Research in Romanticism. His publications include The Revolution in …read more

Source:: http://londonparisromantic.com/?p=1184

The Censorship of British Theatre, 1737-1843

By Emily Paterson-Morgan

New web resource on theatre censorship: https://tobeomitted.tcd.ie

The website explores the topic of theatre censorship in Britain 1737-1843. It hosts 40 carefully selected play manuscripts submitted to the Examiner of Plays who had the primary responsibility of safeguarding the morals of theatre audiences after the passage of the Stage Licensing Act of 1737.

The manuscripts are drawn from the Larpent Collection (Huntington Library, Los Angeles) and the Lord Chamberlain’s Plays (British Library, London) and have been carefully selected to show the variety of reasons a play might be deemed inappropriate through the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries. Each manuscript is accompanied by an author bio, plot synopsis, reception history, and commentary on the censorship. The editorial apparatus amounts to 95,000 words in total.

…read more

Source:: http://www.bars.ac.uk/blog/?p=2714