BARS Exchange

BARS Exchange

Aggregated blogs on Romantic Studies – please click through to read full posts.

Archive for December 2019

CFP – Pacific Paratexts

By Emily Paterson-Morgan

An interdisciplinary symposium exploring paratexts in writing from and about the Pacific

Plenary lectures: Rod Edmond (University of Kent); Anna Johnston (University of Queensland)

Meiji University, Tokyo, Japan, November 7-8 2020

This two-day interdisciplinary symposium investigates the role and status of paratexts in the mediation and representation of Pacific cultures, geography and history. “Paratext” is the label coined by theorist Gerald Genette to describe those threshold devices that help shape a text’s reception, including annotations, blurbs, cover design, epigraphs, fonts, format, front and back covers, glossaries, illustrations, indices, introductions, maps, prologues and epilogues and titles.

Paratexts have been a frequent presence in Western literary representations of the Pacific. Consider, for example, the “Preface”, annotations and glossary that accompanies Louis Antione de Bougainville’s Voyage Autour du Monde (1771); John Hawkesworth’s paratexts for his edition of Captain Cook’s An Account of the Voyages (1773); the famous marginal gloss that accompanies Samuel Taylor Coleridge’s 1817 version of “The Rime of the Ancient Mariner”; Edgar Allan Poe’s deconstructive “Preface” and footnotes for The Narrative of Arthur Gordon Pym of Nantucket (1838); Pierre Loti’s epigraphs, notes and parallel transcriptions of Tahitian and French for The Marriage of Loti (1880); and Robert Louis Stevenson’s ethnographic annotations for his Polynesian Ballads …read more

Source:: http://www.bars.ac.uk/blog/?p=2813

Recipients of the BARS/Wordsworth Trust Early Career Fellowship 2020

By Anna Mercer

BARS and The Wordsworth Trust are delighted to announce that two fellowships have been awarded for 2020.

We received a number of excellent applications, and the two Early Career Researchers taking up the fellowships in 2020 are:

Dr Alexis Wolf

Dr Francesca Mackenney

Congratulations to Alexis and Francesca, and on behalf of everyone at BARS and the Wordsworth Trust, thank you to all those who applied.

The Fellowship invites ECRs to work with Jeff Cowton (Curator and Head of Learning) during one of the most exciting and transformative times in the Wordsworth Trust’s history. The major HLF-funded project ‘Reimagining Wordsworth’ is due for completion in time to celebrate Wordsworth’s 250th birthday on 7 April 2020. The Wordsworth Trust is committed to embracing the Creative Case for Diversity and believe that by welcoming a wide range of influences, practices and perspectives, we can better understand the collection in Grasmere and the stories it can tell, thereby enriching public programmes. The purpose of this Fellowship is to help the Trust to achieve just that – to examine the collection from a different perspective, and to use that perspective and knowledge to help audiences better understand and engage with Wordsworth’s life and work.

about the …read more

Source:: http://www.bars.ac.uk/blog/?p=2809

New Content – Romantic Circles Reviews & Receptions

By Emily Paterson-Morgan

Romantic Circles Reviews & Receptions invites you to check out the exciting new content we have published recently:

  • We are pleased to announce a new section of its site dedicated to conference panel reviews. Just up are reviews of panels from the 2019 NASSR Chicago conference Romantic Elements by Ben Blackman, Sharon Choe, and Elizabeth Giardina, and a collective effort from Alexandra Milsom, Brian Rejack, and Shavera Seneviratne. We also have reviews of panels from the 2019 ICR Manchester conference Romanticism Now and Then by Hannah McAuliffe and Lucia Scigliano and a review of Anne-Lise François’s keynote lecture by Ross Wilson.
  • Recently published book reviews include Richard C. Sha’s Imagination and Science in Romanticism by Bysshe Inigo Coffey, Dahlia Porter’s Science, Form, and the Problem of Induction in British Romanticism by Jeanne Britton, Jonathan Sachs’s The Poetics of Decline in British Romanticism by Carmen Faye Mathes, and Manu Samriti Chander’s Brown Romantics: Poetry and Nationalism in the Global Nineteenth Century by Nikki Hessell, Alexander Regier’s Exorbitant Enlightenment: Blake, Hamann and Anglo-German Constellations by David Simpson, among others.
  • Jim Rovira has curated music playlists for his two recent collections Rock and Romanticism: Blake, Wordsworth, and Rock from Dylan to …read more
  • Source:: http://www.bars.ac.uk/blog/?p=2806

Michael Brown on the War Paintings of Charles Bell, Surgeon

By Dr Fallon

Fig. 1 – Charles Bell, ‘Musket Ball Wound of Skull' (1809). Royal College of Surgeons of Edinburgh.

Reposted from the Surgery & Emotion Blog

WARNING: CONTAINS GRAPHIC IMAGES OF WOUNDS AND INJURIES

Pity and Pride: Picturing the War Wounded in the Work of Charles Bell

November 2019

Principal Investigator Dr Michael Brown of Roehampton University considers the emotional content of the famous war paintings of the surgeon Charles Bell.

I recently had an article accepted for publication by the Journal for Eighteenth-Century Studies which explores the relationship of the Scottish surgical siblings John Bell (1763-1820) and Charles Bell (1774-1842) to war, especially their imaginative and professional investment in military surgery and their complex emotional reactions to the experience of treating the wounded. Drawing on Yuval Noah Harari’s argument that the later eighteenth and early nineteenth centuries saw war configured as an increasingly transcendent emotional event, it considers the difficulties of translating both professional identities and emotional experiences across a widening civil-military divide.[1]

In this regard, what is particularly interesting about both John and Charles Bell is that neither man was a military surgeon. While Charles wrote in 1807 that ‘of all things I should like to be kept and sent to the armies as a surgeon’ and while John agitated for a role in the training of military surgeons, neither …read more

Source:: https://romanticillustrationnetwork.com/2019/12/19/michael-brown-on-the-war-paintings-of-charles-bell-surgeon/

Romantic Reimaginings: On William Wordsworth’s “Nutting” – A Journal Excerpt Followed By A Reflection

By Eleanor Bryan

Romantic Reimaginings is a BARS blog series which seeks to explore the ways in which texts of the Romantic era continue to resonate. The blog is curated by Eleanor Bryan. If you would like to publish an article in the series, please email ebryan@lincoln.ac.uk.

Today on the blog, Sean Wojtczak provides an introspective analysis of William Wordsworth’s ‘Nutting’ through a journal excerpt followed by a reflective piece of writing.

The older I grow, the more a sense of dread sinks into my heart during these long winter months. The barren scenes beyond my window, distorted by the darkening, deepening hues of night bring only melancholy to my mind, and I find myself longing with an increasing intensity for but one glimpse of life. It would be enough to hear the bursts of a squirrel’s chatter, or to spy the elegant step of a deer; but what I truly crave in these lonely hours is for another soul to sit next to me across from this dying fire.

The emotional hardships of Winter certainly come from the season’s longevity, but I would also argue that the true difficulty comes from the fact that the true climax of Winter’s majesty arrives within the first few …read more

Source:: http://www.bars.ac.uk/blog/?p=2790

Cardiff Romanticism and Eighteenth-Century Seminar – 2020 Spring Programme

By Anna Mercer

All are welcome to attend the following events at Cardiff University in early 2020.

All events are free, and start at 6pm in room 2.47, John Percival Building, Cardiff University, CF10 3EG.

18 Feb Dr Lizzy Spencer (University of York) ‘Women, accounting, and intertextuality in England c.1680-1830′

9 Mar Prof Tim Webb (University of Bristol) ‘Leigh Hunt and Romantic Imprisonment’

16 Mar Prof David Duff (Queen Mary, University of London) ‘Coleridge as Prospectus-Writer’

20 Apr Prof Nick Roe (St Andrews) ‘The Rise of Biography in the Eighteenth Century’

Talks are 45-50 minutes followed by questions. Refreshments are provided.

Please direct any enquiries to Anna Mercer (Mercera1@cardiff.ac.uk), and visit the CRECS Blog for updates.

…read more

Source:: http://www.bars.ac.uk/blog/?p=2796

CfP: NASSR 2020 Conference at the University of Toronto

By Anna Mercer

A notice about NASSR 2020 from Terry F. Robinson

Dear BARS Colleagues:

Greetings! You are invited to submit a proposal for the 28th Annual Conference of the North American Society for the Study of Romanticism (NASSR). The NASSR conference, which will bring together 300-400 scholars to discuss literature, philosophy, art, and culture c. 1770-1840, will take place at the University of Toronto, Ontario on August 6-9, 2020.

CONFERENCE WEBSITE

Keynote Speakers:
Elizabeth Maddock Dillon (Northeastern University)
Martin Myrone (Tate Britain)

Topics may include (but are not limited to):

  • Re-envisioning Romanticism: looking back and looking forward
  • Visions and the visionary: perception, prognostication, projection, speculation, the speculative
  • Ways of looking: reading, conceptualizing, observing, peeping, gazing, categorizing, examining, recognizing and misrecognizing
  • Visual culture, philosophy, and aesthetics: objects of sight, spectacle, the spectacular, the sublime and the beautiful
  • Reading methods and histories: careful, close, distant, surface; plagiarism, copyright law
  • Print culture in its social, theoretical, and physical aspects (e.g. text, design, structure, layout); manuscripts, letters, journals, scrapbooks, books, journals, newspapers
  • The seen and the unseen: noumena, phenomena, the spirit world, apparitions and appearances
  • Romantic iconoclasm and anti-representationalism; ocularcentrism and “the tyranny of the eye”
  • Visual communication: text, numbers, notation (e.g. musical), images, sign language, placards, banners, flags, gestures, hieroglyphs, emblems, insignia
  • Questions of form and representation
  • Fashionable …read more

    Source:: http://www.bars.ac.uk/blog/?p=2792

A Review of My Book/My Book Launch

By annamercer90

IMG_1475

Hello! I’d just like to share with you the review of my book as published by the Women’s Studies Group 1558 – 1837.

Here’s the link to the review. Thank you, Jacqueline Mulhallen, for writing this!

Click here to read.

I am also very grateful to the wonderful Keats House Museum; I organised a book launch on 20 September, and they were kind enough to allow me to use the stunning Chester Room as a venue. Some photos below!

Recently on my travels I’ve been to Shelley’s house in Tremadog (now a five star hotel) and the Museo Byron in Ravenna (a work-in-progress, not yet open to the public). I hope to share more details about these places on the Blog soon.

IMG_1483

2910434F-91A0-43A4-8B8E-397585E5C90DB1217D3C-91E9-41E7-AD88-546C66ADC2DA<img data-attachment-id="980" …read more

Source:: https://percyandmaryshelley.wordpress.com/2019/12/17/a-review-of-my-book-my-book-launch/

New BARS Treasurer and New BARS Membership Secretary

By Anna Mercer

An announcement from the BARS Secretary, Dr Jennifer Orr, below.

Dear BARS members,

As you will know, our current Treasurer is stepping down after many years of service to the organisation. We have divided the role to create two new Executive posts of Membership Secretary and Treasurer and I am delighted to announce that Dr Tess Somervell and Dr Cassie Ulph will be taking up these posts, respectively.

As the new membership year will soon be upon us, please note Tess’s details below for any cheques and membership correspondence:

Dr Tess Somervell
Email: t.e.s.somervell@leeds.ac.uk
Tel: +44 (0)113 343 1690
Address: School of English, University of Leeds, LS2 9JT

On behalf of the BARS Executive, I would like to extend our warmest thanks to outgoing Treasurer Dr Jane Moore for her service to BARS over the years.

Wishing you all a Merry Christmas,

Jennifer

Welcome to the team, Dr Cassie Ulph and Dr Tess Somervell! Thank you again, Dr Jane Moore, for your wonderful work with BARS.

…read more

Source:: http://www.bars.ac.uk/blog/?p=2787