BARS Exchange

BARS Exchange

Aggregated blogs on Romantic Studies – please click through to read full posts.

London-Paris Romanticsm Seminar: Mina Gorji, Friday 16 November 2018, Senate House, London

By LPRS

gorji advert

The next meeting of the London-Paris Romanticism Seminar will be held on Friday 16 November in the Bloomsbury Room (ground floor, G35), Senate House, University of London, starting at 5.30. As our guest speaker, we are delighted to welcome Mina Gorji of the University of Cambridge, who will present a paper entitled Romantic Listening: John Clare’s Sympathetic Ear. This will be followed by discussion and wine reception. The event is free and open to everyone.

Mina Gorji is a Senior University Lecturer in English at the University of Cambridge and a Fellow of Pembroke College. She is also co-director of the Cambridge Centre for John Clare Studies. She has written on rudeness, dialect, weeds, poetic awkwardness, Robert Burns’ allusions, Christina Rossetti’s prepositions and the poetry of John Clare. Her published books include John Clare and the Place of Poetry, Rude Britannia (ed.) and Class and the Canon: Constructing Labouring-Class Poetry and Poetics, 1780-1900, which she co-edited with Kirstie Blair. She is a practicing poet who has published in a number of journals and magazines as well as Carcanet’s Anthology New Poetries V. She is currently working on a new monograph, Romantic Listening, which explores …read more

Source:: http://londonparisromantic.com/?p=927

In Memoriam: Jahn Holljen Thon

By dustinfrazierwood

RIN members familiar with Jahn Holljen Thon and his works will be saddened by the news of his passing. The following obituary was written by David Skilton.

Jahn Holljen Thon

We are sad to announce the recent death of Jahn Holljen Thon, who held a chair at Agder University in Kristiansand, Norway, and was Norway’s most innovative researcher in the field of illustrated literature. He was earlier the main cultural critic for left-wing newspaper, and it may be the fact that he did not fit neatly into the inherited academic disciplines that enabled him to pay attention to previously undervalued cultural phenomena such as Scandinavian verbal-visual works. He came to Illustration Studies via an interest in Norwegian works of the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries, and, like many of us, found that general pronouncements on how illustration functions were simply not adequate in relation to his challenging material. He made contact with the group at Cardiff University responsible for the Database of Mid-Victorian Illustration, when it was running a series of workshops in conjunction with the Victoria and Albert Museum under the title of LICAU, Literary Illustration: Conservation, Access, Use. He generously provided funding for the workshops to continue at Lampeter and Kristiansand …read more

Source:: https://romanticillustrationnetwork.wordpress.com/2018/11/01/in-memoriam-jahn-holljen-thon/

Annual Wordsworth Lecture at Senate House, Thursday 22 November 2018

By Anna Mercer

The Wordsworth Trust and the Institute of English Studies, University of London, invite you to

‘A Daedalus for the Romantic Era? Mary Shelley’s Frankenstein’

A talk by Professor Fiona Sampson

The lecture will take place on Thursday 22 November 2018,

6.00-7.00pm in the Chancellor’s Hall, Senate House,

Malet Street, London, WC1E 7HU

The lecture will be followed by a drinks reception.

Both Frankenstein and the Daedalus myth address our fear of the exceptional individual who abuses his talents by overreaching: the maker who doesn’t know when to stop. Both create capacious archetypes, with plenty of space to explore ambivalence and even admiration alongside that fear. But Mary Shelley’s Frankenstein takes us considerably further than the composite Daedalus story: in a number of directions. Political, ethical, existential and scientific, all seem particularly pertinent to British Romantic experience of society and the self. But is it a paradox that this apparently universalisable myth could only have been written in its own time and place?

If you would like to attend, please RSVP with your name and number of places to:

Hannah Stratton, Development Office, the Wordsworth Trust, Dove Cottage, Grasmere, Cumbria, LA22 9SH.
Alternatively, telephone 015394 63520 or email h.stratton@wordsworth.org.uk.
Please RSVP by Friday 16 November.

…read more

Source:: http://www.bars.ac.uk/blog/?p=2257

Call for Papers: Byron Among the English Poets

By Anna Mercer

Call for Papers – New edited essay collection: Byron Among the English Poets

Byron felt deeply that literary tradition mattered. Less wedded to notions of ‘originality’ and ‘genius’ than many of his contemporaries, he instead wrote passionately – and unfashionably – about the value of imitation, allusion, and a thorough acquaintance with past masters. He used poetic forms because he thought of them as embedded in historical moments and circumstances, and he wrote with other voices sounding in his head: Horace and Juvenal, Shakespeare, Milton and Pope amongst them. He was a fierce champion of poets whom he saw as having contributed most to sustaining the English tradition, and he could be correspondingly withering on the subject of contemporaries whom he felt were actively engaged in diluting it. Sometimes he felt attraction and repulsion in equal measure: for all the ridicule in English Bards and Scotch Reviewers and Don Juan of the ‘Lakers’, his writing would have looked very different without the powerful influence of Wordsworth, Coleridge and Southey. Perhaps because of his own openness to the idea of being (for better or worse) part of a literary community, many nineteenth- and twentieth-century poets found points of contact with his writing. …read more

Source:: http://www.bars.ac.uk/blog/?p=2254