Call for Applications: BARS Communications Assistant

By Anna Mercer

The British Association for Romantic Studies (BARS) would like to invite applications for a Communications Assistant to assist with the BARS Blog and social media for a period of one year tenable from June 2021. We are looking for someone with previous experience of using blogs and social media for academic purposes. This position is paid an honorarium of £500 and is open to all postgraduate students and early career researchers working in Romantic Studies anywhere in the world. This role will require around 1-2 hours per week.

Responsibilities will include:

  • Leading and contributing to the BARS Blog series ‘On This Day’ and ‘Archive Spotlight’
  • Proposing and curating new blog posts/series
  • Delivering an active and strategic social media presence
  • Attending online meetings with members of the BARS Executive Committee

The successful applicant will work closely with the Communications Officer, Anna Mercer, and the Blog Editor, Emily Paterson-Morgan.

This post is an excellent career-development opportunity for a PhD student or early career researcher. You will have the chance to develop valuable skills in the field of scholarly communications and to contribute to the BARS postgraduate community. You will gain valuable skills (website management, content creation and digital communications) which will be useful in academic and non-academic roles …read more

Source:: https://www.bars.ac.uk/blog/?p=3661

London-Paris Romanticism Seminar: Romantic Salons and Salonnières, Online International Panel, 21 May 2021

By LPRS

The next seminar in the London-Paris Romanticism Seminar series is an online international panel on Romantic Salons and Salonnières which will take place via Zoom on Friday 21 May 2021 at 17.30-19.30 London time (GMT+1). As our guest speakers, we are delighted to welcome two distinguished Romantic scholars: Susanne Schmid, of the Freie Universität Berlin, who will speak on Travellers, Publishers and Lions: International Contacts and the Countess of Blessington’s Salons; and Carmen Casaliggi, of Cardiff Metropolitan University, whose paper is entitled Germaine de Staël and Ugo Foscolo at Holland House. Abstracts appear below. The two illustrated talks will be followed by a discussion in which questions from the audience are invited. The panel will be chaired by David Duff (Queen Mary University of London).

The seminar is free and open to everyone. Prior registration is necessary. To book a place via the Institute of English Studies website, click here and scroll down to the relevant seminar. When you register, you will be sent a confirmation email containing a Zoom link and details of how to join the online forum. If you do not receive this confirmation email, please contact IESEvents@sas.ac.uk. Whether you wish to contribute or …read more

Source:: http://londonparisromantic.com/?p=1542

Table Talks II: New Approaches to Romantic Studies and Society

By Emily Paterson-Morgan

Please join us on Wednesday 16th June from 6 – 8 pm to discuss new approaches to Romantic Studies and society, including an update on Dr Andrew McInnes’s ‘Romantic Ridiculous’ project, and close readings of texts including Charlotte Smith’s children’s literature, Charles and Mary Lamb’s poetic collaboration, Mary Wollstonecraft’s object lessons, James Woodhouse’s labouring-class eco-poetics, Catherine Gore’s silver fork satire, and a verse biography of S T Coleridge!

More details, including a booklet of our selected texts, and registration here.

…read more

Source:: https://www.bars.ac.uk/blog/?p=3658

Table Talks II: New Approaches to Romantic Studies and Society

By Emily Paterson-Morgan

Please join us on Wednesday 16th June from 6 – 8 pm to discuss new approaches to Romantic Studies and society, including an update on Dr Andrew McInnes’s ‘Romantic Ridiculous’ project, and close readings of texts including Charlotte Smith’s children’s literature, Charles and Mary Lamb’s poetic collaboration, Mary Wollstonecraft’s object lessons, James Woodhouse’s labouring-class eco-poetics, Catherine Gore’s silver fork satire, and a verse biography of S T Coleridge!

More details, including a booklet of our selected texts, and registration here.

…read more

Source:: http://www.bars.ac.uk/blog/?p=3658

CFP: William Cowper, Art and Afterlife

      No Comments on CFP: William Cowper, Art and Afterlife

By Emily Paterson-Morgan

Olney, Buckinghamshire

3–4 September 2021

Call for papers from postgraduate students and early-career researchers for a two-day seminar on
William Cowper.

Cowper lived in and around Olney from 1768 to 1795, and it was here that he wrote Olney
Hymns (1779) with John Newton, Poems (1782), The Task (1785), and translated Homer. The
seminar will be centred on Cowper’s career in verse (hymns, poems, and translations), with a
particular focus on the formal and stylistic elements of this writing. Among a range of potential
subjects, papers may wish to address Cowper’s place in the satirical tradition, the potential for
ecocritical and environmental approaches to poems such as ‘Yardley Oak’ and ‘The Cast-away’,
or Cowper’s critical heritage from Wordsworth and Coleridge to Empson and Davie.

Proposals should be in the form of 150-word abstracts for fifteen- to twenty-minute papers.
Papers will be delivered in a sedentary roundtable format, with fifteen minutes for questions and
conversation. No fee will be charged to postgraduates and / or early career researchers who are
selected to give a paper, and we will provide them with free accommodation and meals.
Speakers include: Will Bowers (QMUL), Alexandra Harris (Birmingham), Andrew Hodgson
(Birmingham), Gregory Leadbetter (Birmingham City), and Fiona Stafford (Oxford).

Email abstracts to w.bowers@qmul.ac.uk and a.hodgson@bham.ac.uk by 5th June 2021

…read more

Source:: https://www.bars.ac.uk/blog/?p=3656

CFP: William Cowper, Art and Afterlife

      No Comments on CFP: William Cowper, Art and Afterlife

By Emily Paterson-Morgan

Olney, Buckinghamshire

3–4 September 2021

Call for papers from postgraduate students and early-career researchers for a two-day seminar on
William Cowper.

Cowper lived in and around Olney from 1768 to 1795, and it was here that he wrote Olney
Hymns (1779) with John Newton, Poems (1782), The Task (1785), and translated Homer. The
seminar will be centred on Cowper’s career in verse (hymns, poems, and translations), with a
particular focus on the formal and stylistic elements of this writing. Among a range of potential
subjects, papers may wish to address Cowper’s place in the satirical tradition, the potential for
ecocritical and environmental approaches to poems such as ‘Yardley Oak’ and ‘The Cast-away’,
or Cowper’s critical heritage from Wordsworth and Coleridge to Empson and Davie.

Proposals should be in the form of 150-word abstracts for fifteen- to twenty-minute papers.
Papers will be delivered in a sedentary roundtable format, with fifteen minutes for questions and
conversation. No fee will be charged to postgraduates and / or early career researchers who are
selected to give a paper, and we will provide them with free accommodation and meals.
Speakers include: Will Bowers (QMUL), Alexandra Harris (Birmingham), Andrew Hodgson
(Birmingham), Gregory Leadbetter (Birmingham City), and Fiona Stafford (Oxford).

Email abstracts to w.bowers@qmul.ac.uk and a.hodgson@bham.ac.uk by 5th June 2021

…read more

Source:: http://www.bars.ac.uk/blog/?p=3656

Five Questions: Eliza O’Brien, Helen Stark and Beatrice Turner on New Approaches to William Godwin

By Matthew Sangster

New Approaches to William Godwin: Forms, Fears, Futures, edited by Eliza O’Brien, Helen Stark and Beatrice Turner, was recently published by Palgrave MacMillan as part of the Palgrave Studies in the Enlightenment, Romanticism and Cultures of Print series. Below, the editors discuss their first encounters with William Godwin, the timeliness, origins and arrangement of the collection, and how they see Godwin Studies developing in the future.

1) How did you each first become acquainted with William Godwin?

Bea: I’m ashamed to say I didn’t meet him until I started my PhD. I came to Romanticism in reverse, via the nineteenth century, and when I started my thesis project on Romantic childhood and Romantic child-parent authorship, I came at him through his daughter Mary and through Romantic ideas about education, so the first work of his I actually read was The Enquirer. I wouldn’t say it was love at first sight, but I was immediately struck by the sense of a mind always to some degree at war with itself. Godwin’s capacity for brutal self-interrogation and at the same time astonishing self-deception, particularly about family matters, is a large part of my fascination with his writing.

Helen: I read Caleb Williams …read more

Source:: https://www.bars.ac.uk/blog/?p=3649

Event organised by The Blake Society: Blake and Dante

By Emily Paterson-Morgan

Luisa Calè (Department of English, Theatre, and Creative Writing Birkbeck, University of London)

18th May

To mark the 700th anniversary of Dante’s death, Luisa Calè asks: What artistic tools, visible languages, prophetic crafts did Blake employ to embody the souls of the damned, test the limits of opaqueness, and capture the translucent experience of paradise?

To register, please click here

…read more

Source:: https://www.bars.ac.uk/blog/?p=3646

Event organised by The Blake Society: Blake and Dante

By Emily Paterson-Morgan

Luisa Calè (Department of English, Theatre, and Creative Writing Birkbeck, University of London)

18th May

To mark the 700th anniversary of Dante’s death, Luisa Calè asks: What artistic tools, visible languages, prophetic crafts did Blake employ to embody the souls of the damned, test the limits of opaqueness, and capture the translucent experience of paradise?

To register, please click here

…read more

Source:: http://www.bars.ac.uk/blog/?p=3646