Archive Spotlight/On This Day 1822- “Remain, thou, thou art so beautiful”: Shelley’s Boat Sketches

By Jack Orchard

The BARS ‘On This Day’ Blog series celebrates the 200th anniversary of literary and historical events of the Romantic period, and our ‘Archive Spotlight’ series showcases research projects based in archives and heritage institutions and showcases work with physical or digital manuscripts. Want to contribute a future post? Get in touch.

As we approach the 200th anniversary of the death of Percy Bysshe Shelley on 8 July 1822, we bring you a special Archive Spotlight/On This Day crossover from Laura Blunsden, who explores the relationship between text an images in Percy Shelley’s notebooks held at the Bodleian Library, focusing on the sketch of a sailing boat in his pocket notebook, its relationship with the texts that surround it, and its haunting foreshadowing of Shelley’s upcoming death.

Between translated lines of Goethe’s Faust and his lyrical poem ‘With a Guitar. To Jane’, a sketch of a sailing boat emerging from around a bend in the river Arno fills an entire page of Shelley’s pocket notebook. The sails are filled with an invisible breeze which ripples the water’s surface with thin, wave-like lines, and sways the curly loops of foliage that cover the sloping river banks. Even the tree, which …read more

Source:: https://www.bars.ac.uk/blog/?p=4221

Five Questions: Porscha Fermanis on Romantic Pasts

By Matthew Sangster

Porscha Fermanis is Professor of Romantic Literature at University College Dublin. Her research interests include Romantic poetry and poetics; the relationship between Romanticism and Enlightenment; history and historiography; nineteenth-century colonial material culture; global Romanticisms; and the history of globalisation. She is the Principal Investigator of the European Research Council-funded SouthHem project. Her recent books include Romanticism: A Literary and Cultural History (Routledge, 2016; with Carmen Casaliggi), Early Public Libraries and Colonial Citizenship in the British Southern Hemisphere (Palgrave, 2019; with Lara Atkin et al) and Worlding the South: Nineteenth-Century Literary Culture and the Southern Settler Colonies (Manchester University Press, 2021; ed. with Sarah Comyn). Her latest book, Romantic Pasts: History, Fiction and Feeling in Britain, 1790-1850, which we discuss below, has just been published by Edinburgh University Press.

1) How did you first become interested in what your introduction describes as ‘the complex relationship between feeling and the making of the modern historical method’?

I’ve been interested in historiography for what seems like a long time now, dating back to my 2009 book on Keats and extending to a co-edited collection on Romantic-era history in 2014 (with John Regan). …read more

Source:: https://www.bars.ac.uk/blog/?p=4224

New BARS Postgraduate and Early Career Representatives

By Jack Orchard

After reviewing a range of very strong candidates, the BARS Executive Committee is delighted to announce two new BARS Postgraduate Representatives:

  • Cleo O’Callaghan Yeoman (Stirling/Glasgow)
  • Yu-Hung Tien (Edinburgh)

The BARS Executive Committee would like to thank the outgoing Postgraduate Representatives Amanda Blake Davis and Colette Davies, and the Early Career Representative Paul Stephens, for all their excellent work.

We wish Colette and Paul all the best with their future careers and are immensely grateful for their work on a multitude of projects, not least the BARS PG/ECR Conferences.

Amanda Blake Davis will now be stepping into the Early Career Representative role.

…read more

Source:: https://www.bars.ac.uk/blog/?p=4219

The BARS Review, No. 57 (Autumn 2021)

      No Comments on The BARS Review, No. 57 (Autumn 2021)

By Matthew Sangster

Seascape with a French cargo vessel sailing on a choppy sea at centre, fishing boats beyond, a Dutch coast seen in distance; proof before lettering; before retouchings in the sky (Gerrit van Groenewegen, 1793). © The Trustees of the British Museum. Reproduction used under a Creative Commons CC BY-NC-SA 4.0 license.

We are glad to announce the publication of the most recent issue of The BARS Review (No. 57, Autumn 2021). The issue contains a total of eight reviews of recent scholarly work within the field of Romanticism, broadly conceived, covering twelve works. Five of the reviews compromise a ‘spotlight’ section on ‘Repositioning Romantic Perspectives’.

The individual reviews are detailed below; as always, all reviews are openly available in html and .pdf through The BARS Review website, and a compilation of all the reviews in the number can be downloaded as a .pdf.

If you have comments on the new number, or on the Review in general, we’d be very grateful for any feedback that would allow us to improve the site or its content. Mark Sandy would also be very happy to hear from people who would like to review for BARS.

Editor: Mark Sandy (Durham University)
General Editor: Anthony Mandal (Cardiff …read more

Source:: https://www.bars.ac.uk/blog/?p=4212

Romantic Circles/K-SAA Anti-Racist Pedagogies Colloquium Fellowship

By Emily Paterson-Morgan

RC Pedagogies and K-SAA see the work of discovering, gathering, developing, and elaborating anti-racist pedagogies as essential to the work of scholars and teachers, not to mention to the viability and relevance of the Romantic period more generally. Since systemic racism has long affected not only what texts are considered canonical, but also how, where, and to whom Romantic-era materials are taught, RC Pedagogies and K-SAA hope to provide support for scholars in expanding access to Romantic-era pedagogy, including resources for teaching in underserved communities and carceral facilities. Such an undertaking must be a collaborative, sustained, and rigorous research project to include bibliographies of available material, articles discussing best classroom practices, contextual materials, and syllabi, compiled into a readily usable/accessible set of pages to be maintained over time.

A joint team of K-SAA and RC scholars seek to appoint a team of 4 Pedagogies Fellows tasked with adding to a permanent yet expanding set of anti-racist pedagogy web links and resources begun by last year’s amazing Fellows (Mahasweta Baxipatra, Conny Cassity, Hilary Fezzy, Lenora Hanson, Indu Ohri, and Erin Saladin). The Colloquium to be held over Zoom during several meetings over four weeks during July-August 2022. Fellows would receive a $500 …read more

Source:: https://www.bars.ac.uk/blog/?p=4209

CFP: The Routledge Handbook to Global Literature and Culture in the Romantic Era

By Emily Paterson-Morgan

Edited by Arif Camoglu, Bakary Diaby, Omar F. Miranda, Gaura Narayan, and Kate Singer

How might we re-envision and extend the “Romantic period” through an archive of texts and forms of expression from multiple communities across the planet during the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries? The Routledge Handbook to Global Literature and Culture in the Romantic Era aims to redefine the contours of the literary and political imaginations of the period by attending to the cultural, linguistic, temporal, and archival differences that constitute our world. Resisting the master narratives of canonical Anglo-European Romanticisms, the volume will offer new readings, including cross-cultural, trans-regional, and transnational analyses, that will highlight aesthetic and political concerns around the globe. It will also expand the linguistic and cultural texts of the period and foreground new sites of knowledge and anti-racist methodologies. We seek chapter proposals that will contribute to the volume’s broad geographical and cultural reach, including but not limited to engagements with Black, Asian, Latinx, and indigenous peoples across the globe and spaces such as the Caribbean, the Americas, Southeast Asia, South Asia, East Asia, Africa, the Middle East, Oceania. We are interested in reconsidering how we put language to “revolutions and social change” and how …read more

Source:: https://www.bars.ac.uk/blog/?p=4207

BARS/BAVS Nineteenth-Century Matters Event

      No Comments on BARS/BAVS Nineteenth-Century Matters Event

By Emily Paterson-Morgan

In the 125th anniversary of Bram Stoker’s Dracula, the event aims to reframe and reclaim 19th-century narratives of vampires, from John Polidori’s 1819 ‘The Vampyre’ to Stoker’s fin-de-siecle novel, by reassessing vampires as figures of recovery, community building, and regeneration. See website below, and event poster attached.

See here for details of the event and CFP.

…read more

Source:: https://www.bars.ac.uk/blog/?p=4204

BARS Digital Events: The Visual Life of Romantic Theatre Recording

By Anna Mercer

Watch the latest BARS Digital Event below!

This BARS roundtable showcased some of the innovative work being undertaken for The Visual Life of Romantic Theatre, 1780-1830 (forthcoming, U Michigan Press), which offers a sustained examination of the dynamism and vibrancy—what we call “life”—of theatrical spectacle and its impact on society and culture, bringing it from the periphery to the centre in Romantic scholarship. Our speakers include Diane Piccitto (Mount Saint Vincent University), Terry F. Robinson (University of Toronto), Susan Brown (University of Prince Edward Island), Uri Erman (Shalem College), Danny O’Quinn (University of Guelph), Deven Parker (Queen Mary University of London), and Dana Van Kooy (Michigan Technological University).

…read more

Source:: https://www.bars.ac.uk/blog/?p=4201

Five Questions: Madeleine Callaghan on Eternity in British Romantic Poetry

By Matthew Sangster

Madeleine Callaghan is a Senior Lecturer in Romantic Literature at the University of Sheffield. Her work focuses on poetry, poetics, culture and philosophy, with a particular focus on Romantic-period writing. Her book-length publications include Shelley’s Living Artistry: Letters, Poems, Plays (Liverpool University Press, 2017), The Poet-Hero in the Work of Byron and Shelley (Anthem, 2019), Twentieth-Century British and Irish Poetry: Hardy to Mahon (co-edited with Michael O’Neill; Wiley-Blackwell, 2011) and The Romantic Poetry Handbook (co-authored with Michael O’Neill; Wiley 2017). Her new monograph, Eternity in British Romantic Poetry (Liverpool University Press, 2022), will be released on June 1st; we discuss this book below.

1) How did you first become interested in the relationship between the mortal and the eternal in Romantic poetry?

I think it’d always been there in the way I read poetry, and perhaps it explains my enduring love of Shelley, whose work is so often that of a poet balancing the claims of the visible and invisible world. I think it sharpened into an actual idea when the more I read Romantic period poetry, the more I saw that tension or negotiation between the mortal and the eternal playing …read more

Source:: https://www.bars.ac.uk/blog/?p=4194

Call for Applications: BARS/Wordsworth Trust Early Career Fellowships

By Anna Mercer

We would like to invite Early Career Researchers who are not in permanent employment to apply for a one-month residential Fellowship with the Wordsworth Trust at Grasmere.

Two Fellowships are available in 2022.

Wordsworth Grasmere is centred around Dove Cottage, the Wordsworths’ home between 1799 and 1808, where William wrote most of his greatest poetry and Dorothy wrote her Grasmere journals. Their lives and writings are at the heart of the Trust’s collection of over 68,000 books, manuscripts and works of art; the collection also encompasses wider Romanticism and the ‘discovery of the Lake District’ 1750-1850.

This Fellowship follows one of the most exciting and transformative times in the Wordsworth Trust’s history. Our major NLHF-funded project ‘Reimagining Wordsworth’, completed in 2021, seeks to raise awareness and change perceptions of Wordsworth’s life and work, furthering his own wish for his poetry to ‘live and do good’. The site has been transformed: Wordsworth Grasmere now has a redesigned and extended museum, a new learning centre, a newly interpreted Dove Cottage and two new outdoor spaces alongside an extensive programme of engagement and activities in Cumbria and beyond.

The Wordsworth Trust is also committed to Arts Council England’s ‘Lets Create’ vision. We believe that by …read more

Source:: https://www.bars.ac.uk/blog/?p=4184