Five Questions: Mark Sandy on Transatlantic Transformations of Romanticism

By Matthew Sangster

Mark Sandy is Professor in the Department of English Studies at Durham University. He has published extensively on Romantic poetry and its legacies, including the monographs Poetics of Self and Form in Keats and Shelley (Ashgate, 2005) and Romanticism, Memory, and Mourning (Ashgate, 2013; reprinted by Routledge, 2019). He has also curated a series of edited collections on Romantic echoes from the nineteenth century to the present day, decadence, Venice and, most recently, the spectral (Ghostly Encounters: Cultural and Imaginary Representations of the Spectral from the Nineteenth Century to the Present (Routledge, 2021), co-edited with Stefano Cracolici). He is currently the editor of The BARS Review. His new monograph, Transatlantic Transformations of Romanticism: Aesthetics, Subjectivity and the Environment, which we discuss below, was published earlier this year by Edinburgh University Press.

1) How did you come to realise you wanted to write a book on the influence of British Romanticism on American literature?

Although my primary research interests have been in Romantic poetry, I have always been fascinated by how you can trace the legacies of Romanticism (positive and negative) in the literary culture of the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. This, coupled …read more

Source:: https://www.bars.ac.uk/blog/?p=3746

BARS Digital Events: ‘Dialogues and Receptions’ Recording Now Online

By Anna Mercer

This roundtable traces the conversations and legacies surrounding Romantic writers such as William Blake, Percy Shelley, William Hazlitt, Alexander Pope, Mary Shelley and Lord Byron.

Our speakers were Bysshe Inigo Coffey (Newcastle University), Daniela Farkas (The Pennsylvania State University), Eleanor Booty (Durham University), and Octavia Cox (University of Nottingham). Chair: Mark Sandy (Durham University).

The next event is Re-envisioning Romantic Publishing on 8 July 2021. Tickets here.

…read more

Source:: https://www.bars.ac.uk/blog/?p=3743

One-year Lectureship in C19th Studies

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By Emily Paterson-Morgan

English & Creative Writing
Salary: £35,845 to £40,322
Closing Date: Friday 25 June 2021
Interview Date: Monday 19 July 2021
Reference: A3392

The Department of English Literature and Creative Writing at Lancaster University is a world-class department currently ranked 1st for Creative Writing and 11th for English Literature in the UK (The Complete University Guide), with 40% of our research rated as 4* in REF 2014.

We seek to appoint a full-time, fixed-term, one-year Lecturer in Nineteenth-Century Studies. You will contribute to lectures and seminars on established courses in the second year: Victorian Literature and/or British Romanticism. You would also contribute teaching in one other area: theory; film and media; or creative writing. These additional contributions would likely involve teaching on one or more of the following: the second-year core module The Theory and Practice of Criticism; and/or the second-year module Literature, Film and Media; and/or the second- or third-year core Creative Writing modules.

You will be able to demonstrate excellent teaching abilities at both undergraduate and postgraduate levels, be willing and able to give lectures and seminars, and have the potential to supervise postgraduate students.
You should have a strong research profile with the potential for publication in top journals and the making …read more

Source:: https://www.bars.ac.uk/blog/?p=3740

Job advertisement: Research and Teaching Fellow, Leeds

By Emily Paterson-Morgan

Research and Teaching Fellow in Romantic Literature
School of English, University of Leeds

Full-time, fixed-term for 12 months, 1 September 2021 to 31 August 2022
Salary: £33,797 (grade 7)
Closing date: Tuesday 22 June
Apply here
Enquiries: Dr Jeremy Davies (j.g.h.davies@leeds.ac.uk) & Prof. Andrew
Warnes (a.warnes@leeds.ac.uk)
Online interviews are provisionally scheduled for Friday 2 July

What does the role entail?
As a Research and Teaching Fellow you will:
• Contribute to the AHRC-funded project ‘Experiments in Land and Society, 1793-1833,’ with a special focus on research in archives relating to Robert Owen (New Lanark; the University of Glasgow; the National Co-operative Archive, Manchester) and/or to John Thelwall (the Jerwood Centre, Grasmere; Derby Library);
• Write or co-author one or more publications based on your research, and present your findings at conferences;
• Work with Wordsworth Grasmere and Lancashire Wildlife Trust on public-facing events and resources arising from project research;
• Take lead responsibility for organising an online conference, ‘Culture and Environment in Britain, 1688–1851′;
• Design and deliver small-group seminar teaching to provide a stimulating and supportive learning environment for students; prepare high quality learning resources; and write and present accessible and academically rigorous lectures;
• Prepare students for assessment tasks through appropriate guidance; …read more

Source:: https://www.bars.ac.uk/blog/?p=3737

Five Questions: Lucy Cogan on Blake and the Failure of Prophecy

By Matthew Sangster

Lucy Cogan is Lecturer in Eighteenth-Century and Romantic Literature at University College Dublin, Ireland. Her research focuses on the intersections of gender, politics and religion in eighteenth- and nineteenth-century writing. She has published articles on Sarah Butler and Charlotte Brooke and edited Charlotte Dacre’s Confessions of the Nun of St Omer for the Chawton House Library Series. Her particular passion is William Blake, on whom she has published several articles and book chapters and who is the subject of her first monograph, Blake and the Failure of Prophecy, which has just been published by Palgrave Macmillan and which we discuss below.

1) How did you first become interested in William Blake?

Back when I was doing an MA in Modernity and Culture and thinking naïvely that I might do a PhD on imagist poetry or something, I took a module run by the eminent Coleridge scholar Jim Mays on intertextuality which featured Milton’s Paradise Lost, Blake’s Milton and Allen Ginsburg’s Howl. Mays had chosen the Tate facsimile edition of Blake’s Milton as the set text but you couldn’t get it anywhere and I became mildly obsessed with hunting it down. After traipsing all over London …read more

Source:: https://www.bars.ac.uk/blog/?p=3729

BARS Review Book Reviewer Recruitment

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By Anna Mercer

The BARS Review is the review journal of the British Association for Romantic Studies, providing timely and comprehensive coverage of new monographs, essay collections, editions and other works dealing with the literature, history and culture of the Romantic period, broadly conceived.

The BARS Review is looking to widen their pool of book reviewers. Reviewing for BARS includes publication in the biannual BARS Review, receiving a copy of the book (ebook or print depending), and becoming an active member of the BARS academic community.

You can view and complete the form here. Thankyou!

If you have any technical issues with this form, please email Katie Harling-Lee at k.o.harling-lee@durham.ac.uk If you have any other queries relating to the BARS Review, please email Mark Sandy at m.r.sandy@durham.ac.uk

…read more

Source:: https://www.bars.ac.uk/blog/?p=3733

Lectureship in Romanticism (10 months fixed term), QMUL

By Emily Paterson-Morgan

The Department of English in the School of English and Drama in Queen Mary’s Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences seeks to appoint a full-time (1.0fte) Lecturer in Romanticism. This 10-month fixed-term Lectureship is to provide cover while Dr James Vigus is on a Fellowship at the Hamburg Institute for Advanced Study, and also to contribute to our general teaching provision where appropriate. The successful applicant will be able to contribute to the development and delivery of team teaching in the Romantic period and beyond, and to demonstrate that they have an innovative approach to the current state of the field. Modules to be taught may include: Romantics and Revolutionaries; Terror, Transgression and Astonishment: The Gothic in the Long Nineteenth Century; Romantic Travellers in Europe; Victorian Fictions.

About You
The successful candidate will hold a PhD (or equivalent) in English, or a related field, and must have a growing or established research profile and substantial plans for future research. They will join a Department committed to an interdisciplinary and global approach to Anglophone literary studies, with significant expertise in Romanticism. Experience in teaching at undergraduate and/or postgraduate levels in large and small group settings is an essential requirement. Applicants who identify as …read more

Source:: https://www.bars.ac.uk/blog/?p=3725

Call for Applications: Communications Fellows for the K-SAA, 2021/22

By Emily Paterson-Morgan

The K-SAA is inviting applications for three fellowships. The fellowships are: two Communications Fellows and one Keats-Shelley Journal+ Fellow (details here).

These fellows will be in post for a period of one year, beginning August 1 2021.

To apply: please send an academic CV and personal statement (1 page) explaining why you are best placed to undertake the duties below to mercera1@cardiff.ac.uk by July 1 2021. Please indicate in your application which fellowship you wish to apply for.

Fellows will be awarded an honorarium for their time of $1,000 USD. Working hours and tasks will be flexible in order to ensure a balance alongside other work commitments.

Applicants should be a postgraduate or early-career researcher, have a strong interest in Romantic literature, and should have previously used social media for academic/professional purposes. They will be able to demonstrate their ability to write and edit academic blog content similar to what is currently presented on the K-SAA Blog. Experience using WordPress and editing websites is desirable. We’d especially like to hear from applicants who have ideas about how expand our community on Twitter and Facebook. This is a highly collaborative post and you will also work closely with the other …read more

Source:: https://www.bars.ac.uk/blog/?p=3723

Promotional Offer: Complete Poetry of Shelley, Volume VII

By Emily Paterson-Morgan

An announcement to BARS members from Nora Crook and Neil Fraistat, General Editors:

Johns Hopkins University Press is offering a 30% discount to UK and EU customers for a limited period (until 30 September 2021) for Volume 7 of the Complete Poetry of Percy Bysshe Shelley, just out in the US, due to be published in Europe on 29 June 2021. Details of how to take advantage of this offer are below. You can order by post, phone, or email from the UK distributor, Wiley, but it isn’t possible to order on-line.

The Complete Poetry of Percy Bysshe Shelley
Volume 7
edited by Nora Crook
Neil Fraistat and Nora Crook, General Editors
European publication 29th June 2021 – Johns Hopkins University Press
1040 pages, ISBN: 9781421437835 £103.50/€124.20

Available at a special discount of 30% off the RRP (£72.45/€86.94 – postage, packing and local taxes extra), when purchasing direct from Johns Hopkins University Press only.

c/o John Wiley & Sons Ltd, Distribution Centre, 1 Oldlands Way, Bognor Regis, West Sussex, PO22 9NQ, UK Tel: +44 (0) 1243 843291 Email: cs-books@wiley.co.uk

Please quote JPBS to obtain 30% discount. Offer expires 30th September 2021.

This offer is specially for UK and EU customers. …read more

Source:: https://www.bars.ac.uk/blog/?p=3721

Dialogues and Receptions

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By Emily Paterson-Morgan

BARS Digital Events, 17th June

This roundtable traces the conversations and legacies surrounding Romantic writers such as William Blake, Percy Shelley, William Hazlitt, Alexander Pope, Mary Shelley and Lord Byron. These speakers shed new light on these writers, often by looking at the nexus of connections and influences between these individuals.

Our speakers include Bysshe Inigo Coffey (Newcastle University), Daniela Farkas (The Pennsylvania State University), Eleanor Booty (Durham University), and Octavia Cox (University of Nottingham).

Register for tickets here

…read more

Source:: https://www.bars.ac.uk/blog/?p=3719