Introductory Post: Wordsworth’s Long Walk to the Lyrical Ballads

By Elias Greig I’m Elias Greig, a PhD student at the University of Sydney, and the Postgraduate Representative for the Romantic Studies Association of Australasia. I’m also, for better or worse, a Wordsworthian. In deference to my generous Welsh hosts, I’ll begin with Dylan Thomas’s appraisal of one William Wordsworth: old Father William was a human nannygoat with […] …read more

Source: http://www.romtext.org.uk/introductory-post-wordsworths-long-walk-to-the-lyrical-ballads/

Finding Funding: Grant Writing for Undergrads

By Eric Loy

Marriage of Heaven and Hell

By Margaret Speer

Recently, Megan and I (the undergraduate Project Assistants to the Blake Archive at the University of Rochester) applied for Discover Grant funding to support our continued work this coming summer. Without funding, we really won’t be able to participate as much as we do during the fall and spring semesters—possibly not at all.

This is a relevant concern for undergraduates trying to be involved in research-based projects and internships. It seems like it’s a necessary experience to know what you’re doing (you get practical experience, academic immersion, networking potential, a line on your résumé or CV) and to get where you’re going (graduate school, further internships, potential jobs). But, if you’re an undergrad trying to make a dent in your tuition (maybe with an eye to master’s degree debt coming up) and you can’t afford a job that doesn’t pay, then it’s especially a catch-22.

Seeking research grant funding is an excellent way for undergraduates to resolve this problem. Most obviously, it materially facilitates the edifying and rewarding work that you want to be doing. Further, taking on the responsibility to make a coherent and convincing statement …read more

Source: http://blakearchive.wordpress.com/2014/03/19/finding-funding-grant-writing-undergrads/

A ‘passion which consumed me’: Byron and Foscolo’s Ultime Lettere di Jacopo Ortis

By Helen Stark By Helen Stark, Newcastle University In September 2013 I was lucky enough to spend 5 days in the Pforzheimer Collection at the New York Public Library, largely – despite the myriad treasures there – consulting just one item: Teresa Guiccioli’s copy of Ugo Foscolo’s Ultime Lettere di Jacopo Ortis (1802), annotated by Lord Byron in […] …read more

Source: http://www.romtext.org.uk/a-passion-which-consumed-me-byron-and-foscolos-ultime-lettere-di-jacopo-ortis/

CfP: Making, Breaking and Transgressing Boundaries: Europe in Romantic Writing, 1775-1830

By admin

Please see below for the CfP for Making, Breaking and Transgressing Boundaries: Europe in Romantic Writing, 1775-1830, which will take place later this year. As well as responses to the CfP, the organisers are also keen to hear from students who would be interested in contributing to the conference’s discussion blog – please email romanticboundaries@gmail.com. You can find the conference on Twitter @RBoundaries.

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Making, Breaking and Transgressing Boundaries: Europe in Romantic Writing, 1775-1830
Postgraduate and Early Career Researchers Interdisciplinary Conference
Newcastle University – 15 July 2014

From William Blake to Germaine de Staël, Jean-Jacques Rousseau to Thomas Robert Malthus, the Romantic period is fraught with attempts to define and redefine concepts of European boundaries. This one-day conference invites papers which consider the making, breaking and transgression of boundaries in response to revolution and national struggle across Europe between 1775 and 1830. As the borders of political territories move, expand and collapse, how is this then translated into political, philosophical and literary discourse? What does it mean for a writer in this period to cross boundaries as an exile and travel in a way distinct from the Grand Tour? How …read more

Source: http://www.bars.ac.uk/blog/?p=239

Five Questions: Ian Haywood on Romanticism and Caricature

By admin

Romanticism and Caricature - Ian Haywood

Ian Haywood is Professor of English at the University of Roehampton and co-directs Roehampton’s Centre for Research in Romanticism. He has published widely on literature, history and politics from the late eighteenth to the mid nineteenth century, focussing particularly on radicalism, revolution, popular literature and visual culture. He is currently serving as Vice-President of BARS and previously co-organised the association’s eleventh International Conference, Romantic Circulations. In this interview, we discuss his latest book, Romanticism and Caricature, which was published by Cambridge University Press last October.

1) How did you come to decide that this was the next book you wanted to write?

In my last two books, The Revolution in Popular Literature (2004) and Bloody Romanticism (2006) I had gravitated towards using popular visual images as a primary rather than a secondary source. I began to appreciate some very obvious points about popular prints: they were the nearest thing to a visual …read more

Source: http://www.bars.ac.uk/blog/?p=200

Reading Group Report: ‘The Misguided Imaginations of Men’: Adam Smith, Jeremy Bentham and the Principle of Self in Shelley’s Speculations on Morals and Metaphysics

By NENC

11th March 2014
Dr Leanne Stokoe
The first session of the newly organised NENC saw members meet at Newcastle University on Tuesday 11th March. The session was hosted by Newcastle’s Dr Leanne Stokoe, who gave a paper on the ‘Principle of Self’ in Shelley’s Speculations on Morals and Metaphysics, written in fragments between 1817 and 1821, and published posthumously by Mary Shelley in 1840. Leanne’s paper focussed on Shelley’s contemplation of ‘disinterestedness’, often interpreted as semi-Godwinian in its outlook, as drawing instead upon the utilitarian philosophy of both Adam Smith and Jeremy Bentham. Leanne explored, firstly, Shelley’s attraction to Smith’s Theory of Moral Sentiments (1759), before moving on to Bentham’s interpretation of Smith’s doctrines and his own ideas about social ‘happiness’. Ultimately, however, Shelley’s Speculations suggest that these insights on the permanence of self-interest are ‘misguided’, with Shelley proposing instead a vision of self-interest that offers an altruistic humanity.

Questions and discussion followed on the composition and publication of the fragments, the movement in recent criticism away from the Victorian perception of Shelley as Matthew Arnold’s ‘beautiful and ineffectual angel, beating in the void his luminous wings in vain’ (1881) and ways in which to …read more

Source: http://www.northeast19thcentury.org/2014/03/reading-group-report-misguided.html

Regional and National Networks at Chawton House

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By cassieulph

The final event of Creative Communities, a workshop on Regional and National Networks, took place at Chawton House, Hampshire, on 24-25 January 2014. As the gallery below illustrates, this was another lively and productive event.

The programme for the workshop is available here: programme

Click to view slideshow.

Will Bowers, recipient of one of two postgraduate bursaries awarded by the network, reported on the event. You can read Will’s report here: …read more

Source:: https://creativecommunities17501830.wordpress.com/2014/03/14/regional-and-national-networks-at-chawton-house/

Regional and National Networks at Chawton House

By cassieulph

The final event of Creative Communities, a workshop on Regional and National Networks, took place at Chawton House, Hampshire, on 24-25 January 2014. As the gallery below illustrates, this was another lively and productive event.

The programme for the workshop is available here: programme

Click to view slideshow.

Will Bowers, recipient of one of two postgraduate bursaries awarded by the network, reported on the event. You can read Will’s report here: …read more

Source: http://creativecommunities17501830.wordpress.com/2014/03/14/regional-and-national-networks-at-chawton-house/

Blake Archive is now on Twitter!

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By Eric Loy

Blake Archive Twitter Profile

We’re excited to announce that the William Blake Archive has [finally] arrived on Twitter. You can find and tweet us using @BlakeArchive.

We often lovingly refer to the Archive as a “mature” digital project–the website first created in the halcyon days of 1996–but expanding the Archive’s online social presence struck us as a good opportunity to connect with other projects and people around the world dedicated to the digital humanities. In other words, we envision social media to be more than a frivolous side enterprise. Understanding the cultural landscape of the modern Web, we see social media as potentially integral to the goals of the Archive and to digital humanities in general.

So what will that look like? We outlined a basic strategy for what you might see in our future Twitter feed:

  • Publication Announcements: Did we mention that we have a new batch of letters coming soon?
  • Blog Posts: Twitter is great way to share blogging content.
  • Blake Content: anything from Blake artwork to excerpts from his letters.
  • Tweets to other projects and library collections: communication, collaboration, support, and maybe a few inside jokes?
  • Re-Tweets of digital humanities / archive news: sharing DH news and encouraging a …read more

    Source: http://blakearchive.wordpress.com/2014/03/12/blake-archive-twitter/

Frankenstein and Fantasmagoriana, Story 2: Les Portraits de Famille

By maximiliaan@gmail.com As noted in my previous blogs on Frankenstein and Fantasmagoriana, the first story read by the Byron-Shelley circle on that stormy night in June 1816, L’ Amour Muet, was not as influential and well-known as the second story, Les Portraits de Famille / The Family Portraits. Mary Shelley herself stated that Les Portraits de Famille […] …read more

Source: http://www.romtext.org.uk/frankenstein-and-fantasmagoriana-story-2-les-portraits-de-famille/