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BARS Blog

News and Commentary from the British Association for Romantic Studies

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BARS First Book Prize 2019: Judges’ Report

Thanks to everyone who submitted their first books to the 2017-2019 round. In total, the judging panel received 29 titles from which we created a short list of 8. In terms of gender breakdown, 14 of the nominated books were by men and 15 by women. Of the final 8, 3 books were by men and 5 by women with 3 published by Cambridge University Press, 2 by Oxford University Press, 1 by University of Virginia Press, 1 by Bucknell University Press and 1 by Palgrave. Shortlisted authors were based in the UK, the US and Australia. It was a real privilege to read across our dynamic field and encounter so much excellent work. Warm congratulations to all authors of first books, especially to the winners and runners up!

Claire Connolly (University College Cork; Chair), Daniel Cook (University of Dundee), Jane Moore (Cardiff University) and Mark Sandy (University of Durham).

WINNER

Thomas H. Ford, Wordsworth and the Poetics of Air (Cambridge UP)

We are familiar with atmosphere as a figure that names the air that surrounds us: as historical situation, emotional environs or prevailing psychological climate. These metaphorical meanings draw on early modern discoveries in the natural sciences and began to circulate more generally in culture from around 1800. Thomas Ford’s book, Wordsworth and the Poetics of Air thinks about how, when and where this powerful new vocabulary of atmosphere took shape. The book guides readers through territory at once literal and figurative, helping us to see anew the elements, moods and impressions that seem to surround and pervade poems, novels and plays. In the writing of William Wordsworth in particular, and amidst the ‘winds, clouds, fogs, mists, breezes, breaths and sighs’ of romantic poetry more generally, Ford finds a vocabulary and grammar of atmosphere and air. The result is a wholly original and deeply researched book that joins literary, historical and environmental forms of interpretation in harmonious ways and offers a genuinely original reading of ‘Tintern Abbey’. Wordsworth and the Poetics of Air draws an impressive range of critical sources into the flow of its own argument and moves beyond new historicist and ecocritical readings alike in its reinterpretation of the ways in which form both breathes and is shaped by climate. The very permeability of atmosphere seems to be reproduced in the disciplines that surround and support Ford’s approach, as anthropology, chemistry, politics, philology, physiology, meteorology, philosophy and aesthetics all mediate and colour the work of literary criticism. Above all, Wordsworth and the Poetics of Air enables an address to Romanticism both as defined period or object of knowledge in the past and as the writing of an unfixed and uncertain present. For that we thank Thomas Ford warmly and are proud to confer upon him the BARS First Book Prize for 2019.

RUNNERS UP

Melissa Bailes, Questioning Nature: British Women’s Scientific Writing and Literary Originality: 1750-1830 (Virginia UP)

An impressive new history that allows the natural sciences to reclaim a central cultural place via a close focus on the work of women writers of the period. The book shows how women writers appropriated the hierarchies of contemporary natural history and geology in order to subvert them for their own artistic, social, and political means. The book makes a very strong and deeply researched case for rethinking Romanticism’s engagement with discourses of natural history and revising established gendered readings of the period.

Manu Samriti Chander, Brown Romantics: Poetry and Nationalism in the Global Nineteenth Century (Bucknell UP)

A strikingly original analysis of late nineteenth-century colonial poets who testify to the influence of an earlier nineteenth-century Romanticism while simultaneously calling into question its imperial ideology. The book tracks the experience of colonial marginalization across the empire, considering the crossing of universalist ideals and particular cultural experiences in the work of three poets in particular (Henry Derozio in India, Egbert Martin in British Guiana, and Henry Lawson in Australia). In its detailed research and close attention to newspapers as a publishing output for colonial poets, the book expands our understanding of Romanticism and reorients the field.

Dahlia Porter, Science, Form, and the Problem of Induction in British Romanticism (Cambridge UP)

An original and deeply researched book that makes a case for a new understanding of induction as both method and form in Romanticism, fresh and compelling in its attention to the composite forms that shape the Romantic book. Porter’s monograph addresses a key Romantic idea – that print is out of control – and finds historical, critical and cultural ways to reimagine that diagnosis as a constitutive aspect of Romanticism. Her argument extends from citational practices around 1800 to thinking about how composition becomes self-referential and historical by the 1820s and 1830s.

Special Open Access Issue of ‘L’analisi linguistica e letteraria’ on the Shelleys in Milan

We are delighted to announce the online publication of a special issue of the international peer-reviewed journal L’analisi linguistica e letteraria entitled ‘The Shelleys in Milan, 1818-2018’.

Each article investigates a different aspect of the Shelleys’ Milanese experience, from their first impressions of the Italian states to the influence of this period on their artistic development. Taken as a whole, the articles in this issue demonstrate that the Shelleys’ reading, the places they visited, the encounters they made, and the cultural atmosphere they experienced in and around Milan in early 1818 left an indelible mark on their later works.

Find articles by Francesco Rognoni| Marco Canani and Valentina Varinelli | Kelvin Everest | Will Bowers | Carla Pomarè | Marco Canani | Alberto Bentoglio | Anna Anselmo | Antonella Braida | Lilla Maria Crisafulli |Michael Rossington

You can follow this link to read and download the articles for free: http://www.analisilinguisticaeletteraria.eu/fascicolo-3-2019/. No registration is required.

Romantic Circles: new Pedagogies Commons volume on Teaching Global Romanticism

New at RC Pedagogies Commons: Teaching Global Romanticism, edited by Wendy C. Nielsen.

The essays and syllabi in this volume present varied approaches to teaching Romanticism in a global context. This volume includes essay by Eric Gidal, Wendy C. Nielsen, Marques Redd, Zak Sitter, Juan Sanchez, and Joel Pace plus three syllabi on the respective topics of European Romanticism, Introducing Global Romanticisms, and Mapping the Black Atlantic. You can find it all here: https://romantic-circles.org/pedagogies/commons/global.

About this Volume

The essays on Teaching Global Romanticism collected here present varied approaches to teaching Romanticism in a global context through individual assignments, units, and syllabi. The contributors share ways to enrich pedagogical approaches to Romantic literature and culture with texts and ideas from beyond Britain and America. These essays discuss how literature guides students’ engagement with international themes and issues in the Romantic period and after. The initiative for this volume began under the leadership of William Stroup.

About the Romantic Circles Pedagogies Commons Series

The Romantic Circles Pedagogy Commons is a peer-reviewed online journal dedicated to the presentation of essays about teaching that offer sample teaching materials as well, from printable handouts to “digital-born” teaching materials.

The BARS Review, No. 53 (Spring-Autumn 2019)

William Blake, Illustration to Dante’s “Divine Comedy”, ‘Paradiso’, Canto XXV – St Peter, St James, Dante and Beatrice with St John (1824-27). © Trustees of the British Museum. Reproduction used under a Creative Commons CC BY-NC-SA 4.0 license.

We are glad to announce the publication of the most recent issue of The BARS Review (No. 53, Spring-Autumn 2019).  The issue contains a total of fifteen reviews of recent scholarly work within the field of Romanticism, broadly conceived.  Six of the reviews compromise a ‘spotlight’ section on ‘Romantic Ideas’.

If you have comments on the new number, or on the Review in general, we’d be very grateful for any feedback that would allow us to improve the site or its content.  Mark Sandy would also be very happy to hear from people who would like to review for BARS.

Editor: Mark Sandy (Durham University)
General Editors: Ian Haywood (University of Roehampton) and Anthony Mandal (Cardiff University)
Technical Editor: Matthew Sangster (University of Glasgow)


No 53 (2019)

Table of Contents

Reviews

Christina Lupton, Reading and the Making of Time in the Eighteenth Century
Sophie Laniel-Musitelli
Joanna Wharton, Material Enlightenment: Women Writers and the Science of Mind, 1770-1830
Olivia Murphy
Sibylle Erle and Morton D. Paley, eds., Reception of William Blake in Europe
Susan Matthews
Jeff Strabone, Poetry and British Nationalisms in the Bardic Eighteenth Century: Imagined Antiquities
David Stewart
Brandon C. Yen, The Excursion and Wordsworth’s Iconography
Brandon Wernette
Stephanie Elizabeth Churms, Romanticism and Popular Magic: Poetry and Cultures of the Occult in the 1790s
Tim Sommer
Robin Schofield, The Vocation of Sara Coleridge: Authorship and Religion
Amy Wilcockson
Jessica Fay, Wordsworth’s Monastic Inheritance: Poetry, Place, and the Sense of Community
Adam Potkay
Heather Tilley, Blindness and Writing: From Wordsworth to Gissing
Jayne Thomas

Spotlight: Romantic Ideas

Paul Cheshire, William Gilbert and Esoteric Romanticism: A Contextual Study and Annotated Edition of The Hurricane
Jacob Lloyd
Dahlia Porter, Science, Form, and the Problem of Induction in British Romanticism
James Morland
Maximiliaan van Woudenberg, Coleridge and Cosmopolitan Intellectualism 1794–1804: The Legacy of Göttingen University
Chris Townsend
Evan Gottlieb, Romantic Realities: Speculative Realism and British Romanticism
David Higgins
Brian Rejack and Michael Theune, eds., Keats’s Negative Capability: New Origins and Afterlives
Amina Brik
Charles Morris Lansley, Charles Darwin’s Debt to the Romantics: How Alexander von Humboldt, Goethe and Wordsworth Helped Shape Darwin’s View of Nature
Daniel Vázquez Calvo

Whole Number

The BARS Review, No. 53 (Spring-Autumn 2019) – review compilation
The BARS Review Editors

New Content – Romantic Circles Reviews & Receptions

Romantic Circles Reviews & Receptions invites you to check out the exciting new content we have published recently:

  • We are pleased to announce a new section of its site dedicated to conference panel reviews. Just up are reviews of panels from the 2019 NASSR Chicago conference Romantic Elements by Ben Blackman, Sharon Choe, and Elizabeth Giardina, and a collective effort from Alexandra Milsom, Brian Rejack, and Shavera Seneviratne. We also have reviews of panels from the 2019 ICR Manchester conference Romanticism Now and Then by Hannah McAuliffe and Lucia Scigliano and a review of Anne-Lise François’s keynote lecture by Ross Wilson.
  • Recently published book reviews include Richard C. Sha’s Imagination and Science in Romanticism by Bysshe Inigo Coffey, Dahlia Porter’s Science, Form, and the Problem of Induction in British Romanticism by Jeanne Britton, Jonathan Sachs’s The Poetics of Decline in British Romanticism by Carmen Faye Mathes, and Manu Samriti Chander’s Brown Romantics: Poetry and Nationalism in the Global Nineteenth Century by Nikki Hessell, Alexander Regier’s Exorbitant Enlightenment: Blake, Hamann and Anglo-German Constellations by David Simpson, among others.
  • Jim Rovira has curated music playlists for his two recent collections Rock and Romanticism: Blake, Wordsworth, and Rock from Dylan to U2 and Rock and Romanticism: Post-Punk, Goth, and Metal as Dark Romanticisms, both of which can be streamed through iTunes or Spotify.
  • Our section on “Romanticism and Popular Culture” continues to document both old and new references to Romantic texts and figures in, for example, HBO’s mini series Watchmen, runway shows at New York fashion week, and Mel Brooks’s Blazing Saddles. Have you seen any Romanticism in the wilds of pop culture lately? If so, please submit your examples here.

We are also happy to welcome two new Associate Editors Alex Gatten and Lenora Hanson. If you have ideas for reviews of books, conferences, or digital scholarship resources, or for bookchats or booklists, then please get in touch with a member of the editorial collective here.

Associate Editors: Suzanne L. Barnett, Alex Gatten, Lenora Hanson, and Ross Wilson

General Editors: Orrin Wang and Paul Youngquist

The BARS Review, No. 52 (Autumn 2018)

We are delighted to announce the publication of the most recent issue of The BARS Review (No 52, Autumn 2018).  The issue contains a total (including a double review) of nineteen reviews of recent scholarly work within the field of Romanticism, broadly conceived.  Five of the nineteen reviews compromise a ‘spotlight’ section on ‘Romanticism, the Landscape, and the Environment’.

This issue of The BARS Review is dedicated to the memory of Professor Michael O’Neill (1953-2018) and includes his review of John Barnard’s 21st-Century Oxford Authors: John Keats.

If you have comments on the new number, or on the Review in general, we’d be very grateful for any feedback that would allow us to improve the site or the content.  Mark Sandy would also be very happy to hear from people who would like to review for BARS.

Editor: Mark Sandy (Durham University)
General Editors: Ian Haywood (University of Roehampton), Susan Oliver (University of Essex) & Nicola J. Watson (Open University)
Technical Editor: Matthew Sangster (University of Glasgow)

Table of Contents

Dedication

To Michael O’Neill (1953-2018)
Mark Sandy

Reviews

John Regan, Poetry and the Idea of Progress, 1760-1790
Fiona Milne
Roger Maioli, Empiricism and the Early Theory of the Novel
Gillian Skinner
Diego Saglia, European Literatures in Britain, 1815-1832
Gillian Dow
Jonathan Crimmins, The Romantic Historicism to Come
Francesco Marchionni
G. A. Rosso, The Religion of Empire: Political Theology in Blake’s Prophetic Symbolism and Chris Bundock and Elizabeth Effinger, eds., William Blake’s Gothic Imagination: Bodies of Horror
Sibylle Erle
Heidi Thomson, Coleridge and the Romantic Newspaper: The Morning Post and the Road to ‘Dejection’
Charles W. Mahoney
Madeleine Callaghan, Shelley’s Living Artistry: Poems, Letters, Plays
Christopher Stokes
O. Bradley Bassler, Kant, Shelley and the Visionary Critique of Metaphysics
Merrilees Roberts
Roger Whitson, Steampunk and Nineteenth-Century Digital Humanities: Literary Retrofuturisms, Media Archaeologies, Alternate Histories
Kostas Boyiopoulos
Bo Earle, Post-Personal Romanticism: Democratic Terror, Prosthetic Poetics, and the Comedy of Modern Ethical Life
Paul Hamilton
Jane Austen, The Beautifull Cassandra: A Novel in Twelve Chapters. Afterword by Claudia L. Johnson. Artwork by Leon Steinmetz.
Megan Quinn
Ainsley McIntosh, ed., Marmion: a Tale of Flodden Field. The Edinburgh Edition of Walter Scott’s Poetry.
Anna Fancett
John Barnard, ed., 21st-Century Oxford Authors: John Keats
Michael O’Neill

Spotlight: Romanticism, Landscape, and the Environment

Julia M. Wright, Representing the National Landscape in Irish Romanticism
Finola O’Kane
Thomas H. Ford, Wordsworth and the Poetics of Air: Atmospheric Romanticism in a Time of Climate Change
Yimon Lo
David Higgins, British Romanticism, Climate Change, and the Anthropocene – Writing Tambora
Thomas Bristow
Tom Furniss, Discovering the Footsteps of Time: Geological Travel Writing about Scotland, 1700-1820
Gerard Lee McKeever
Paige Tovey, The Transatlantic Eco-Romanticism of Gary Snyder
Antonia Spencer

Whole Number

The BARS Review, No. 52 (Autumn 2018) – review compilation
The BARS Review Editors

Romanticism Celebrates 25 Years

Written by Romanticism editor, Nicholas Roe.

The 25th publishing anniversary of Romanticism offers an opportunity to reflect on the origin of the journal three decades ago. In the mid-1990s there was no UK-based journal dedicated to publishing a broad range of essays, articles and reviews in the Romantic field. There were specialised journals, some of them of remarkable longevity such as the Keats-Shelley Memorial Bulletin and the Byron Journal. The Review of English Studies and Essays in Criticism published essays on Romantic literature from time to time alongside other material. In the US there were the Keats-Shelley Journal, Blake Quarterly, The Wordsworth Circle, and other author-focused publications, as well as the prestigious and long-established Studies in Romanticism. There seemed to be a gap for a new UK-based scholarly journal that would publish the most significant new critical and scholarly work in the field, with a reviews section dedicated to longer reviews of new work in the field.

Back cover of the first issue of Romanticism (1995).

The founding editors were myself, Drummond Bone, Jane Stabler, and Tim Webb. We met at Bow-of-Fife on a summer afternoon in 1994 and discussed how the journal might best be projected and published: we agreed that it should focus on the big picture, 1750-1850, that it should welcome critical, historical, textual and bibliographical essays prepared to the highest scholarly standards, and that it must seek to represent a full range of current methodological and theoretical debate. The immediate problem was how to find a publisher, and who to invite to join the board of Advisory Editors.

Vivian Bone was at that time Director of Edinburgh University Press, so there was, we hoped, a prestigious Scottish University publisher that would welcome the new journal and put it into successful production. The founding board of Advisory Editors comprised the following roster of distinguished scholars (with their 1995 affiliations):

John Barnard (Leeds University)
Anne Barton (Cambridge University)
Lilla Crisafulli Jones (University of Bologna)
John Donovan (University of York)
Kelvin Everest (Liverpool University)
David Fairer (Leeds University)
Neil Fraistat (University of Maryland)
Paul Hamilton (University of Southampton)
John Kerrigan (Cambridge University)
Greg Kucich (University of Notre Dame)
Nigel Leask (Cambridge University)
Grevel Lindop (Manchester University)
J. C. C. Mays (University College Dublin)
Vincent Newey (Leicester University)
Lucy Newlyn (Oxford University)
Michael O’Neill (Durham University)
David Punter (Stirling University)
Susan Wolfson (Princeton University)

The first issue of Romanticism was published by Edinburgh University Press in April 1995, with new work my Morton D. Paley, Jennifer Wallace, John Barnard, Philip Shaw, Simon Bainbridge, Jane Stabler, Timothy Clark and Mark Allen, Nick Havely, John Kerrigan and David Chandler.

Front cover of the first issue of Romanticism (1995).

Originally published twice a year, since 2006 Romanticism has been published triannually. Katie Garner at St Andrews University is now reviews editor, and the first of three 25th anniversary issues, a stimulating gathering of essays on ‘Transporting Romanticism’ has just been published. From bees to ballooning, ‘Jane Austen’s Mobility’, and Romantic and Victorian nonsense poetry Romanticism continues to show new directions of travel in Romantic studies. Some planned future issues will focus on ‘Romanticism and Ageing’, Thomas De Quincey, John Clare, and Jane Austen.

Find out more about Romanticism and read the latest issue, on ‘Transporting Romanticism’, here.

To celebrate, the editors have hand-selected 25 articles from the archive which are free to read! Read them here.

This blog has been reposted with kind permission from Prof Nicholas Roe. You can see the original post here.

The BARS Review, No. 51 (Spring 2018)

William Blake, from A Small Book of Designs: The First Book of Urizen (1794). ©Trustees of the British Museum. Used under a Creative Commons CC BY-NC-SA 4.0 license.

The Editors, led by Mark Sandy, are pleased to announce the publication of the 51st number of The BARS Review, the ninth available in full online through our open-access system.  The list of contents below includes links to the html versions of the twenty-one articles, but all the reviews are also available as pdfs.  If you want to browse through the whole number at your leisure, a pdf compilation is available.

If you have comments on the new number, or on the Review in general, we’d be very grateful for any feedback that would allow us to improve the site or the content.  Mark Sandy would also be very happy to hear from people who would like to review for BARS.

Editor: Mark Sandy (Durham University)
General Editors: Ian Haywood (University of Roehampton), Susan Oliver (University of Essex) & Nicola J. Watson (Open University)
Technical Editor: Matthew Sangster (University of Glasgow)

Table of Contents

Reviews

Dafydd Moore, ed., The International Companion to James Macpherson and The Poems of Ossian
Gerard Lee McKeever
Timothy Michael, British Romanticism and the Critique of Political Reason
Elias Greig
Robert Mayer, Walter Scott and Fame: Authors and Readers in the Romantic Age
Caroline McCracken-Flesher
Saree Makdisi, Reading William Blake
Katherine Fender
Claire Trévien, Satire, Prints and Theatricality in the French Revolution
Ian Haywood
Richard Lansdown, ed., Byron’s Letters and Journals. A New Selection
Gioia Angeletti
Brycchan Carey, ed., The Interesting Narrative by Olaudah Equiano
John Bugg
Alan Rawes and Diego Saglia, eds., Byron and Italy
Maria Schoina
Lily Gurton-Wachter, Watchwords: Romanticism and the Poetics of Attention
Andrew Franta
E. J. Clery, Eighteen Hundred and Eleven: Poetry, Protest and Economic Crisis
Lisa Vargo
Beth Lau, ed., Jane Austen and Sciences of the Mind
Inger S. B. Brodey
E. J. Clery, Jane Austen, The Banker’s Sister
Claire Harman
Mark J. Bruhn, Wordsworth Before Coleridge: The Growth of the Poet’s Philosophical Mind, 1785-1797
Adam Potkay
Ewan James Jones, Coleridge and the Philosophy of Poetic Form and Michael Tomko, Beyond the Willing Suspension of Disbelief: Poetic Faith from Coleridge to Tolkien
Philip Aherne
Michael D. Hurley and Marcus Waithe (eds.), Thinking through Style: Non-Fiction Prose of the Long Nineteenth Century
Andrew Hodgson

Spotlight: Romantic Heirs and Inheritors

Juliet Shields, Nation and Migration: The Making of British Atlantic Literature, 1765-1835
Clare Elliott
Anahid Nersessian, Utopia, Limited: Romanticism and Adjustment
Christopher Geary
Andrew Burkett, Romantic Mediations: Media Theory and British Romanticism
Ralf Haekel
Beatrice Turner, Romantic Childhood, Romantic Heirs: Reproduction and Retrospection, 1820-1850
Malini Roy
Tom Mole, What the Victorians Made of Romanticism: Material Artifacts, Cultural Practices, and Reception History
Richard Cronin
Andrew Radford, Mary Butts and British Neo-Romanticism: The Enchantment of Place
Sam Wiseman

Whole Number

The BARS Review, No. 51 (Autumn 2018) – review compilation
The BARS Review Editors

The BARS Review, No. 50 (Autumn 2017)

George Cruikshank, ‘Death or Liberty!’ (1819). ©Trustees of the British Museum. Used under a Creative Commons CC BY-NC-SA 4.0 license.

The Editors, led from this number forward by Mark Sandy, are pleased to announce the publication of the 50th number of The BARS Review, the eighth available in full online through the new website.  The list of contents below includes links to the html versions of the fifteen articles, but all the reviews are also available as pdfs.  If you want to browse through the whole number at your leisure, a pdf compilation is available.

If you have any comments on the new number, or on the Review in general, we’d be very grateful for any feedback that would allow us to improve the site or the content.

Editor: Mark Sandy (Durham University)
General Editors: Ian Haywood (University of Roehampton), Susan Oliver (University of Essex) & Nicola J. Watson (Open University)
Technical Editor: Matthew Sangster (University of Glasgow)


Reviews

Neil Ramsey and Gillian Russell, eds., Tracing War in British Enlightenment and Romantic Culture
E. J. Clery
Timothy Campbell, Historical Style: Fashion and the New Mode of History, 1740–1830
Jane Taylor
J. A. Downie, ed., The Oxford Handbook of the Eighteenth-Century Novel
Natasha Simonova
Joseph Rezek, London and the Making of Provincial Literature: Aesthetics and the Transatlantic Book Trade
Jon Mee
[Robert Southey], Letters from England by Don Manuel Alvarez Espriella, ed. Carol Bolton
Diego Saglia
Kristina Mendicino, Prophecies of Language: The Confusion of Tongues in German Romanticism
James Vigus
Lisa Ottum and Seth T. Reno, eds, Wordsworth and the Green Romantics: Affect and Ecology in the Nineteenth Century
Viona Au Yeung
Tabish Khair and Johan Höglund, eds., Transnational and Postcolonial Vampires: Dark Blood
Carly Stevenson
Ruth Livesey, Writing the Stage Coach Nation: Locality on the Move in Nineteenth-Century British Literature
Christopher Donaldson
Peter Garside and Karen O’Brien, eds., The Oxford History of the Novel in English: Volume 2: English and British Fiction 1750-1820
Yi-cheng Weng
Daniel Cook and Nicholas Seager, eds., The Afterlives of Eighteenth-Century Fiction
Rachel Sulich

Spotlight: Rethinking Liberty in the Romantic Era

Jon Mee, Print, Publicity, and Popular Radicalism in the 1790s: The Laurel of Liberty
John Bugg
Fiona Price, Reinventing Liberty: Nation, Commerce and the Historical Novel from Walpole to Scott
Simon Edwards
Daniel M. Stout, Corporate Romanticism: Liberalism, Justice, and the Novel
Alexander Dick
Jennifer Orr, Literary Networks and Dissenting Print Culture in Romantic-Period Ireland
Bridget Keegan

The BARS Review, No. 49 (Spring 2017)

1200px-charles_thevenin_-_la_fete_de_la_federation

The Editors are pleased to announce the publication of the 49th number of The BARS Review, the seventh available in full online through the new website.  This number includes twenty-seven reviews covering thirty-one new publications, as well as a special spotlight on Romantic Revolutions.  The list of contents below includes links to the html versions of the articles, but all the reviews are also available as pdfs.  If you want to browse through the whole number at your leisure, a pdf compilation of all the reviews is available.

If you have any comments on the new number, or on the Review in general, we’d be very grateful for any feedback that would allow us to improve the site or the content.

Editor: Susan Valladares (St Hugh’s College, University of Oxford)
General Editors: Ian Haywood (University of Roehampton), Susan Oliver (University of Essex) & Nicola J. Watson (Open University)
Technical Editor: Matthew Sangster (University of Glasgow)

 


The BARS Review, No 49 (Spring 2017)

Table of Contents

Reviews

Meiko O’Halloran, James Hogg and British Romanticism: A Kaleidoscopic Art
Holly Faith Nelson
Gillian Williamson, British Masculinity in the Gentleman’s Magazine, 1731 to 1815
Caroline Gonda
Bernard Beatty, Byron’s Don Juan
Anna Camilleri
Clara Tuite, Lord Byron and Scandalous Celebrity
Emily A. Bernhard Jackson
Sara Guyer, Reading with John Clare: Biopoetics, Sovereignty, Romanticism
Adam White
Adam Roberts, Landor’s Cleanness. A Study of Walter Savage Landor
Gioia Angeletti
Marilyn Butler, Mapping Mythologies: Countercurrents in Eighteenth-Century British Poetry and Cultural History
Chris Bundock
Mark Canuel, ed., British Romanticism: Criticism and Debates
Octavia Cox
Adriana Craciun, Writing Arctic Disaster: Authorship and Exploration
Murray Pittock
David Porter, The Chinese Taste in the Eighteenth Century
William Christie
Jennifer Jesse, William Blake’s Religious Vision: There’s a Methodism in His Madness
Keri Davies
Andrew Bennett, ed., William Wordsworth in Context and Robert M. Ryan, Charles Darwin and the Church of Wordsworth
Christopher Donaldson
Kate Parker and Courtney Weiss Smith, eds., Eighteenth-Century Poetry and the Rise of the Novel Reconsidered and Eric Parisot, Graveyard Poetry: Religion, Aesthetics and the Mid-Eighteenth-Century Poetic Condition
Tobias Menely
Angela Wright and Dale Townshend, eds., Romantic Gothic: An Edinburgh Companion
Matt Foley
Jim Davis, Comic Acting and Portraiture in Late-Georgian and Regency England
Heather McPherson
Liam Lenihan, The Writings of James Barry and the Genre of History Painting, 1775-1809
Christopher Rovee
John Bugg, ed., The Joseph Johnson Letterbook
James M. Morris
Stewart Cooke with Elaine Bander, eds., The Additional Journals and Letters of Frances Burney, Volume I: 1784-1786
Cassandra Ulph
Amy Prendergast, Literary Salons Across Britain and Ireland in the Long Eighteenth Century
Susanne Schmid
Tim Fulford, Romantic Poetry and Literary Coteries: The Dialect of the Tribe and Tim Fulford and Michael E. Sinatra, eds., The Regency Revisited
Josefina Tuominen-Pope
Matthew Wickman, Literature After Euclid: The Geometric Imagination in the Long Scottish Enlightenment
Marcus Tomalin
Mark J. Bruhn and Donald R. Wehrs, eds., Cognition, Literature, and History
Niall Gildea
Chase Pielak, Memorializing Animals during the Romantic Period
Barbara K. Seeber

Spotlight: Romantic Revolutions

David Andress, ed., The Oxford Handbook of the French Revolution
Liam Chambers
A. D. Cousins and Geoffrey Payne, eds., Home and Nation in British Literature from the English to the French Revolutions
Amy Milka
James Mulholland, Sounding Imperial: Poetic Voice and the Politics of Empire, 1730-1820 and Evan Gottlieb, Romantic Globalism: British Literature and Modern World Order, 1750-1830
Juan Luis Sánchez
Mary Fairclough, The Romantic Crowd: Sympathy, Controversy and Print Culture
David Fallon